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Your question is rather confusing, but I'm going to assume you want to avoid smooth high frame rate footage To do this, set your iPhone X to record at 24fps (or 30, if 24 is not available) and use the same frame rate (24/30fps) in Adobe Premiere. It is important to make sure your iPhone X is also recording at the correct frame rate, as recording in 60fps ...


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You can tell by the shadows that light's illumination was increased. However, you can acheive a similar result (though not perfect) by just keyframing the 'Curves' effect in After Effects. (I had better results with 'Curves' as opposed to 'Levels') See below: The curves were keyframed from default to: The top point is to blow out the whites, the middle ...


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Recording in log gives you a higher range to play with in post, so if your phone supports it, you should do it. If the phone is locked down for specific shots, you can try to film one pass of the shot with low brightness, crushing some dark areas, a normal pass, and a bright pass, overexposing the highlights a bit. If you now stitch those passes together, ...


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OMG strobe! That's what the "laggy" effect is; it was very popular with "experimental" film school students back in the nineties. It went the way of lens flares and the posterisation effect; some would say it is better left in its tomb, but that's a matter of personal taste. If you slow down the video you'll see what's going on, the apparent frame rate is ...


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