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5

It's generally preferred to use the actual dialog audio from the take. It matches the movement of the lips, it sounds right for the environment, the actor is giving an authentic performance, etc. And, you don't have to pay the actor to come back for an extra day re-recording audio in a rented sound booth. "Looping" in audio after a scene is shot is ...


4

You can tell by the shadows that light's illumination was increased. However, you can acheive a similar result (though not perfect) by just keyframing the 'Curves' effect in After Effects. (I had better results with 'Curves' as opposed to 'Levels') See below: The curves were keyframed from default to: The top point is to blow out the whites, the middle ...


4

Ever see the credit for "focus puller" in a film's credits? That's a single person's job, just to keep the camera focus where it should be on a moving shot (or even for changing the focus point at the right time in an otherwise static shot). Usually the shot would be blocked out before hand, and they would work out exactly where the object of focus is going ...


3

I'm not able to state a conclusive definition for "visual grammar", but I'd say camera settings have a quite relevant role on building it. Depth of field (aperture) is crucial for focusing on a subject; ISO may be used for obtaining a noisy image which can be used to say something (to look like an amateur, or a security camera, for instance); WB ...


2

Given the angle, I'd say it's a reflector. The line of people on the right are standing with their backs to the sun, it's probably there to bounce a bit of fill light on to their faces, so they're not silhouetted.


2

Shows can be either "Single camera" or "Multi camera." Sitcoms, shows broadcast live, and stuff shot in front of a live audience is generally multicam -- they do it once, or as few times as needed to get a good take. They just have three (or however many) cameras, and cut between them. Other stuff is Single camera. Some "Single camera" stuff actually has ...


1

I can't answer your question about the lenses, but any good editing software should let you apply a fisheye effect after the fact. Just find the effects menu in whatever software you are using, and such an effect should be in there. For example, if you are using Final Cut Pro, the effects menu should be in the top right hand corner (here's the Apple help ...


1

Don't try to judge critical focus from the viewfinder on the back of the camera. They are usually far too low resolution to be able to tell if things are pin-sharp or not (even with a loupe device). You'll need an external monitor, the higher resolution the better. You can use focus assist if your camera has it, which adds a highlight colour to sharp edges. ...


1

Your question is rather confusing, but I'm going to assume you want to avoid smooth high frame rate footage To do this, set your iPhone X to record at 24fps (or 30, if 24 is not available) and use the same frame rate (24/30fps) in Adobe Premiere. It is important to make sure your iPhone X is also recording at the correct frame rate, as recording in 60fps ...


1

OMG strobe! That's what the "laggy" effect is; it was very popular with "experimental" film school students back in the nineties. It went the way of lens flares and the posterisation effect; some would say it is better left in its tomb, but that's a matter of personal taste. If you slow down the video you'll see what's going on, the apparent frame rate is ...


1

Sites like google are not enough to quickly find reference of valuable information on the topics I mentioned above Oh, my... You live in a privileged era, never, ever in the history of humankind was the information, examples, tutorials, were so easily available. Where? the internet. The problem I see without knowing you, but reading your question is that ...


1

I like to add one more thing that is often overlooked: Provide excellent catering on set. A hungry crew is not a happy crew.


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