23

The default settings for ffmpeg are very low quality, and since you don't specify any codec or quality parameters it's just using the defaults (I don't know why the devs don't fix that because it generates a lot of questions on forums everywhere). Edit: the defaults are now quite sane. With a recent build of ffmpeg you don't need to specify anything more ...


15

There was one, but it fell in to disuse and isn't used very often anymore, largely because of the lack of mobile support, but also due to security issues it created. It was called Flash.


11

Let me explain you from scratch. MOV, MP4, AVI, MKV etc all these are just containers, It is just kind of wrapper which contains audio, video, text, metadata file together as one file. It does not play a big role in the size of a file. Size of the file heavily depends on audio and video codec and bit-rate of that audio video codecs. So there is a ...


8

The University of Bath released a paper demonstrating a vector-based video codec a couple of years ago, with a press release asking "is the pixel about to die?". Strangely since then the pixel hasn't died, in fact there are even more of them around than there used to be. You could argue that most video codecs do actually use vectors: DCT (or similar), - ...


6

MP4/h264 is widely supported today. I'd even say it's the most supported video format since the existence of digital video (without having actual statistics to back that claim). There is really no reason to deliver .wmv anymore when targeting a multi platform audience, the version of Windows Media Player that came with XP doesn't support MP4 but newer ...


6

SVG supports animation using JavaScript and the animate element. That means using a browser or embeddable renderer like WebKit to render it, though. Older games often used their own vector animation formats. You might look into the asset formats supported by open source implementations of old game engines like ScummVM and Sarien. There are some asset ...


6

The basics of that are actually not that complicated (while there is definitely more to know about that topic than would fit in this answer). Take a look at that graphic you can find on the w3c-website: As you can see, the container is exactly that: a container that can contain different types of media, most notably video and audio, but also captions and ...


6

I recently encountered this exact problem and I was able to repair the file using Untrunc, a program created specifically to solve this problem, as suggested by sparrowt on SuperUser: For this method you need: another video file which isn't broken a linux installation (I used Ubuntu 12.04) and basic ability to use a command line. This is ...


5

That looks more like a 'field' from the video, rather than a frame -- jagged diagonals are the tell. If your video is interlaced, you may only get half the vertical resolution in a still, unless you specifically set it to output a full frame. Check the export settings.


5

"I copy pasted Final Cut Events and Final Cut Projects folders to my external HD but I don't know how to restore it into project in FC. Any help is appreciated." It's better to perform this type of operation from within FCPX, instead of the Finder via copy/paste. With the project selected in the Project Library, choose File->Move Project... As long as you ...


5

Premiere Pro CS5 should be able to import H.264 video, IIRC, however it may be having trouble with the audio and/or container format. With ffmpeg try re-muxing the video stream without the audio: ffmpeg -i input -an -codec:v copy output.mp4 -an -codec:v copy output.avi If both output.mp4 and output.avi work then we know that the issue lies with the audio (...


5

To understand this you need to understand how codecs actually work. A plain uncompressed video frame e.g. a single picture is pretty large. I'm talking about a bitmap, not a lossless encoded video, no encoding at all, just plain pixel information. Here simple example of a Full HD frame for some perspective: We have a resolution of 1920x1080 that equals to ...


5

This isn't a phenomenon, this is compression. It is simply how it works. Compression works by taking an input, runs it through some algorithms and then gets an output that matches up either exactly (lossless) or approximately (lossy) with the original input. It is not stored like normal video data as a set of pixels, but rather some form of data that ...


5

h.264 is very widely supported and can be found in multiple different types of container formats. mp4 or m4v are probably the most widely used extensions, but particular support for files varies based on what players are installed on devices. MP4 is the official MPEG 4 standard container format. M4V is an originally Apple based container which also added ...


4

I think the simplest way to this is to use MP4Box. ./MP4Box -add file1.mp4 -cat file2.mp4 -cat file3.mp4 output.mp4


4

It's the compression! The color resolution is a factor, but not such a big one. In this case the compression is the biggest factor. If you assume that both the 4K Edition and the 4K Cineform contain the same material, 4K Cineform contains more than 13x the information (as stated on the timescapes.org products page). But is more really better? Cineform ...


4

So, the answer to your question is 'yes, but...' It's perfectly feasible, but you have to create an output module with the settings that you want, and then save it to your computer. You can create this by going to Edit -> Templates -> Output Module. Click on the 'New' button in the pop-up window, and then Edit it for the settings you need (quicktime, h....


4

Updated: this tool can now recover files from more sources. Try with recover_mp4_to_h264. It's a command line program, and will require a good reference file. Usage as indicated: recover_mp4 in_good_similar.mp4 --analyze recover_mp4 in_corrupted.mp4 {out_video.h264 | out_video.hevc | --novideo} [out_audio.aac | out_audio.wav | out_audio.mp3 | out_audio....


4

Probably a fragmented MP4. Remux it using ffmpeg. ffmpeg -i filename -c copy out.mp4


4

MPEG-4 is not a container specification. It's a suite of specifications. Parts 12 and 14 define containers (MP4). Part 2 defines a video codec, whose encoder implementations are DivX and Xvid. Part 10 defines another video codec AVC a.k.a. H.264. You can get a list of codecs, which can theoretically be present in a MP4 at http://mp4ra.org/codecs.html ...


4

It's a quite complex topic, but yes, when dealing with non-royalty-free technologies you are in some cases required to pay royalties to the patent holders, depending on your usage. This usually applies when you are the distributor of the video/audio content, but it depends from technology to technology. Patent pools are groups of companies that claim fees ...


4

VP9 is a video format. Another example is H.264. WebM is a container format that VP9 goes into. It is equivalent to the MP4 container format for the H.264 video format. libvpx is a video encoder (or codec) which outputs the VP8 or VP9 video formats. Another encoder example is x264 which outputs the H.264 video format.


4

The reason there is no widely used uncompressed video format, as there is for audio is that the data rate for uncompressed video is so colossal that uncompressed video is kinda useless. While a relatively cheap device has been able to deal with a stream of PCM audio since the eighties, even today you need fast storage and a decent system to play a stream of ...


3

The simple answer is yes for a couple of reasons: if the number of pixels is the same*, the colour depth can have a huge impact on the size. 12 bit = 4096 in decimal. So if the difference between the two formats is 13.2 (330/25) that could be easily explained as the difference between 8 bit and 12 bit is could be a 16x difference. the content on each of the ...


3

Guess the original poster found his way to do it - I found the following that worked for me, even though I followed a different procedure. I didn't want to convert the MTS files before importing them to iMovie into anything else and was missing too the additional index / descripition files. this is the source and works for Sony SW / Cams. Potentially with ...


3

MP4 with AAC audio and h.264 video is definitely playable on the PS3, and since it's an extension of Apple's .mov files, it should work on all the iDevices too. For maximum compatibility, use the h.264 'baseline' profile, and avoid AAC-HE. Older devices (like some DVD players) may require XVID video and AC3 audio in an AVI container, but that won't apply ...


3

Use Mpeg Streamclip, its an industry used conversion software that is reliable and fast, and free


3

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


3

I can recommend Adapter. It is a Wrapper for the ffmpeg package and does its job pretty well. Because of its easy UI. You could also use ffmpeg directly via macports, but I think that Adapter is far easier to control.


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