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4

This is actually a collateral effect of the concept of rolling shutter. Most video devices do not expose all the frame area at once. They expose starting from one side and (up or down) and move from there. (The example has the camera rotated 90° so the effect is on the sides of the frame). This can be either a mechanical element that moves or rotates or an ...


4

You can tell by the shadows that light's illumination was increased. However, you can acheive a similar result (though not perfect) by just keyframing the 'Curves' effect in After Effects. (I had better results with 'Curves' as opposed to 'Levels') See below: The curves were keyframed from default to: The top point is to blow out the whites, the middle ...


3

I would try using a displacement map. You can use a solid with turbulent noise on it and use it as your map, then animate the evolution, contrast and brightness so it displaces the film accordingly. If your burn is a separate layer, you can also use this as the matte for the solid with turbulent-noise in it with the effect "set matte". Also, you might want ...


2

I use long workaround in Premiere and it works for all sorts of stabilizers not only for warp (I use 3rd party). What I do is masking out unwanted object. But you cannot do that on same clip, since Premiere will serve naked frame to the stabilizer tool. So what I do is put some effect on clip that masks moving parts. It can be title, power window, crop, or ...


2

What a fade out does is fade the volume from input level to 0 and then keep it at 0 for the rest of the track. Similarly, what a fade in does is fade the volume from 0 to input level and it mutes the volume from the start of the track upto the fade in start time. When you applied the fade in after the fade out, the 2nd fade filter is working with a muted ...


2

I suggest to use the very noise that your camera captures and blend it with the photograph. point your camera against a white object (e.g. wall, door) The automatic exposure should stop down the lens until the white becomes a mid grey. capture as long as you need In your Editor, blend the grey noise with the photo by using a layer blending mode like "...


2

Without having seen the movie, it may be difficult to get it down exactly, but here is what I came up with. Duplicate your layer twice, so that you have three copies. On the top layer mask out the person. Set the mask feather to around 30px. Copy and paste the mask to the other two layers. On the middle layer, set the mask feather to 60 and the mask ...


1

You can do this by selecting every layer except the solid (your letterbox) and precomping it. Then, you can switch into your precomp and do as much zooming as you like. If you then render the composition with your precomp plus the solid layer on top, your solid will be unaffected by the keyframing going on inside the precomp.


1

The overall steps are: I. On a photo editor (Ps, Gimp, Photowhatever) Duplicate the image several times, One per element of your final composition, for example. Background, player, monster 1, monster 2, ax. Mask each element, normally with the lasso tool or similar, so you isolate the element on that layer. For the background, you need to expand it a bit ...


1

OMG strobe! That's what the "laggy" effect is; it was very popular with "experimental" film school students back in the nineties. It went the way of lens flares and the posterisation effect; some would say it is better left in its tomb, but that's a matter of personal taste. If you slow down the video you'll see what's going on, the apparent frame rate is ...


1

A good option is Davinci Resolve. It has a specific feature called Retime controls, where you put a couple of markers and select the speed of that particular segment. 90 Minutes is quite long, you probably want to make some proxy videos at smaller resolution and then render using the original clip.


1

The Guitar Pro website doesn't list video as one of the output formats available within the software. So, you'll need to use screen capture software to record the animated tabs, then composite this over your instrument footage. Alternatively, you could use hardware video mixing devices to combine the video feed of the tab playback with a live camera feed ...


1

Create your text layer. Create a 100% black solid layer Create a 100% white solid layer, make sure it is above the black layer. Precomp the two solid layers (cmd/control + shift + c) and jump into the comp. Add a 'venetian blinds' effect to the white layer and delete the keyframes that automatically accompany it. Set the 'Direction' to -90deg, 'transition ...


1

This is a desired look that stills photographers have been creating with Helios 44 lenses. It's quite possibly a native analogue effect see swirly bokeh. To simulate the effect using the above using @clif's three layer solution. On the bottom layer with spherical distortion, radial focus blur, and some circular smearing increasing at the boundary of the ...


1

That is simply greenscreen compositing. These days it is relatively easy to track a camera movement from a random video clip, you can for example film the yard and composite a 3D car over it. On this case, I would film the person on a green screen room with markings and even render the yard itself. One more complicated way to do it would be a robotic arm ...


1

An oldie question, but let's add an answer... The answer depends on if the faces are moving through the frame. If the faces are relative still, like a camera on a tripod and the persons sitting in front of the camera, any video editor with more than 1 video channel can do the trick. Just add a layer with something on it, a prepared semi-transparent PNG as ...


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