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4

DVD Video is limited to Standard Def, not High Def (HD). Blu-Ray overcomes that limitation. Alternatively you can use the DVD as a filesystem and play arbitrary media using a computer. But as a media container itself, the DVDs limits are very restricted.


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Old/small TVs tended to overscan their images. The "title-safe" area was about 90% of the original image. The DVD's format ensures that despite such overscanning, everything in the image is visible, including the titling shown in red at the bottom of the image, which is hard up against the limit of the frame and thus requires that the image be reduced so ...


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One big loss in converting VHS to DVD arises from going through the composite domain. Both VHS and MPEG2 use a separated chroma paradigm -- on the VHS tape are two signals, essentially luma and bandwidth-limited chroma. MPEG2 (the standard for DVD) also uses separate luma and chroma. But the standard output from a VHS player combines the signals in a way ...


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I finally made it work in splicing directly the VOB files with the commands below : ffmpeg -i VTS_01_2.VOB -ss 463 -c copy -vframes 325 2-manuchoisit.vob ffmpeg -i VTS_01_2.VOB -ss 353 -t 16 -c copy 3-manutombe.vob and then concat the extracts and convert with ffmpeg -analyzeduration 200M -probesize 150M -i "concat:1-manubus.vob|2-manuchoisit.vob|3-...


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In the first step you are doing a lossy conversion, you transcode from vob to mp4, and then to ts. For a lossless re-mux you should just re-mux, better to specify both video and audio: ffmpeg -i VTS_01_1.VOB -c:v copy -c:a copy -bsf:v h264_mp4toannexb -f mpegts intermediate1.ts However, if you re-mux for the purpose of slicing then you should be aware that ...


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A musician family member who edited video on his Apple PowerBook G4, swore by Handbrake. Handbrake is now available cross platform OSX, Linux, and Windows (through Windows 10). Much this musician's work in later years was ripping and repackaging DVD footage - and what he particularly liked was that Handbrake was "bulletproof." It even ripped mini-DVD AVCHD ...


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I regularly use Sony DVD Architect for building complex DVD (as well as simple, it's quite intuitive) like commercials ones. DVD Architect is compatible with Blu-Ray, but doesn't include advanced features like BD live and other. From the same editor with a similar ergonomy, you can use DoStudio. There are two editions: DoStudio Ex: expensive but complete, ...


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Yes, MPEG-2 video is stored as YCbCr, but video editing programs (like Cinelerra) convert the samples to RGB for processing during editing. That range is 16-235. From Wikipedia on YCbCr Analog YPbPr from analog R'G'B' is derived as follows: To get a YUV output in the 16-235 range, the input RGB is also limited.


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The good old ffmpeg gives you the power ;) ffmpeg -i input.avi -c:v libxvid output.avi You can obviously fine tweak the command line with bitrate, audio in mp3 and so on. es: ffmpeg -i input.avi -c:v libxvid -b:v 512k -c:a libmp3lame -qscale:a 4 output.avi This is for a single bitrate use, where you use a constant bitrate for every frame. Otherwise you ...


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Adobe released Photoshop CC 2015.0.1 this evening and it seems to have fixed the problem. (I had tried again with a short clip and couldn't get any sound.) So, unfortunately, I don't really know what the problem was, but this patch seems to have fixed it.


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They came in as .ogg?? I thought you converted to dvd? Are you talking about then ripping the DVD video with HandBrake or something? Also, you're doing something wrong, or at least have your file extension -> "open with" settings screwed up if renaming a .ogg to a .mp4 is necessary. Maybe it opens with a different player then, and only the player ...


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Remuxing it will probably help, as the apps are generally smart enough to detect random crap and skip over it, as well as fix the timing information. You didn't mention if it's a ripped as in copied direct MPEG-2 file or one ripped using HandBrake or something else. Either way, use ffmpeg, avconv, or mkvmerge to remux them. ffmpeg (or avconv) -i source....


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Your command already achieves that. When specifying -r as an output option, ffmpeg will change the framerate of the video, duplicating or dropping frames as necessary to achieve the same overall duration. The audio stream will be processed independently, thus not affecting the pitch (since the overall duration is not changed) or sync (since the timestamps of ...


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You will need to work within the title safe areas when burning to DVD as depending on what the final player will be, there might be overscan which will/can crop anything out that is not within this field. as for the pixel things, I'm not to sure.


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Using ffmpeg, cat and remux all the VOBs together to a MPEG program stream. ffmpeg -i "concat:vts01_1.vob|vts01_2.vob|vts01_3.vob" -c copy -f dvd dvd.mpg (You may have to escape the | character i.e. vts01_1.vob\|vts01_2.vob\|vts01_3.vob)


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Keep the original files on two different storage units, preferably different storage types, say external HDD and Blu-ray. Keep the distro of your editing app and the license key. Keep the OS version you used to run the editing app including the license key. Keep the project file. Author a DVD-Video for your family to watch, especially the elders who are not ...


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Have you considered uploading to Youtube? Upload as unlisted, so only people who you give the link can find it (or if you're really concerned, password protect it). It's going to be easier for most people to watch than an optical disk, you can use whatever resolution you want, and I'd be willing to bet that Google is going to be around longer than the DVD ...


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It depends on your goal: If you must deliver to viewers with only a classic DVD player then make it a DVD. If they only have a Blu-Ray player then make it a Blu-Ray. For content preservation I would recommend to basically write all original content onto a disk with highest possible quality in wrappers/containers that are widely supported (high-quality JPEG ...


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Summary response for summary question :) CRF 20 will look really nice 8-bit (no advantages over 10-bit) No tuning. Grain tuning is for grainy source (old content). SSIM is for testing. No additional parameters needed. VFR (same as source) I could really, really, reallly go down the rabbit hole with a more detailed answer, but I'll leave it at this for now.


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To answer only the first part, film sound is often split into three parts: music, effects, and dialog. This allows dialog to be replaced for dubbing. This isn't a hard-and-fast rule but it's the general way it's been done for a long time. This is not how the sound is released, though. For release these are combined into a theatrical mix of two or more (for ...


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More than 'what do I need', you should ask yourself 'how much am I allowed'. This page mentions an average bitrate of 4-5 Mbits/s, this is audio + video + subtitles. It also depends on the length of your content (as you also have a maximum capacity of about 4.7 Gb for a single layer DVD-Video). FLAC is not supported on DVD-Video, common audio codecs are ...


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Whatever else you may be facing, one big obstacle is the DVD players themselves. They're not designed to output 1080p. Even if you could get the image onto them in Bluray format, they couldn't output it. (If they're really Bluray players, then you don't need any hacks, just a dupe of the image.) If the content is something they want to see, people will be ...


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I ended up spending $30 to buy MacX DVD Ripper. Worked great. Easily converted the video files on the DVD to an MP4 file, which loaded right into Premier.


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I think most HW players that can play mp4/avi/mkv/etc files-in-a-directory will load external-file subtitles if you just put them in the same directory as the video. Burn it to a data DVD, or put it on a USB stick, and you're done.


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The best way to conserve the VHS's would be to scan each frame in at the highest quality possible and export to a video file, this would be a very long process and would require some expensive kit or a professional service. If they are historical value and you want the best it would be worth spending the money and getting it done by a pro but that cost is ...


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No it is not possible to create a hybrid DVD/Blu-Ray disk in the manner which you describe. The reason for this is that in addition to the digital formats between the two being different the physical media is different too. You would require a multi-layer or multi-sided disk such as the one you linked to and different digital data on each side. DVD ...


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The problem is probably not WMP but the Microsoft MPEG-1 codec. The straight forward solution other than using a decent player is to use a better codec pack - ffdshow, it feeds WMP through the operating system level. Besides the seek issue you'll probably get better playback performance, and it doesn't require any end-user involvement - they continue to use ...


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