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7

With low light levels your brightest signal will be close to the noise floor, so you only really have three options: a camera with better low light performance (although this can only take you so far) More expensive sensors can give a lower noise floor, allowing you to resolve more detail a faster lens As Jason commented: If the widest aperture on ...


7

General SDI vs. HDMI Information SDI is easier to connect to other professional equipment than HDMI. It is an all purpose signal, as opposed to HDMI that was originally intended only to connect to consumer display devices. There may be a slight advantage in quality where HDMI can be limited to 4:2:0 subsampling at certain resolutions, where SDI will usually ...


7

It depends on the camera. Digital sensors such as those used in DSLRs produce heat as they capture images. The main issue with extended video capture is the accumulation of heat in the sensor. If it gets hot enough, it is possible that either a) quality can be reduced temporarily due to increased noise or b) at the extreme end, damage to the sensor could ...


6

Generally speaking, it is not possible to use a camera flash as a light for video. A true flash is a high intensity discharge bulb which produces a very short (1/100 second or shorter), very bright burst of light. It is not designed to be used for constant light output and has insufficient power, durability or cooling to be able to operate as a continuous ...


5

I disagree with the above answers. Our visual culture and the century of cinema has dictated that we evaluate a 180 degree shutter as "normal", because that is how film cameras have worked almost forever, and that is how most scenes in every movie are shot. 180 degree shutter is the same as 1 over twice the frame rate, or 1/48 for 24fps. If there is ...


5

This requires a repetitive motion and good lighting. You expose the position of the droplet on successive oscillation, but capture it at a slightly different spot on each. Thinking about it from the perspective of a ball bouncing. On the first photo, I take a quick photo of the ball on the ground. The ball bounces up and then back down. I then take a ...


5

The biggest problem you are facing is that a DSLR typically records to the H.264 codec. That codec tries to minimize the file size and the only way to achieve that is to throw out negligible information. Sadly human eyes are not sensitive to black parts of video, so dark areas are highly compressed. That means you will have a really hard time brightening ...


5

With the Sony alpha 5000 camera specifically, you will run into trouble trying to do continuous video capture (10 hours or more). It will stop recording after 29min and 50seconds and then you will have to start it recording again. Update: Per @John this only applies to actual recording. If you plugin the HDMI out to a video capture device, you can stream ...


4

It depends no how far away you are shooting from and how centered your subject will be. You definitely DO NOT want a lavalier mic for your situation. They do offer very nice noise reduction while not requiring a boom operator, but they still require setup and distinct micing of each speaker. This will not work at all in your use case. You absolutely want ...


4

The minimum software is hardware. You want specialized hardware for doing top quality live streaming encoding reliably. You could use something like the Black Magic ATEM television studio which includes 4 inputs and real time stream encoding capability to produce the conference really well or could use a cheaper stream encoder device that simply produces a ...


4

You should consider other options than Nikon/Canon. Even if they have proven DSLR can do really good video, thanks to 5D Mark II/III and Magic Lantern, they do not compete well against Panasonic and Sony. If you compare 5D Mark III against a Sony A7S, you're going to have a much better video quality on A7S, thanks to its far superior sensor. Much higher ...


4

It doesnt really matter what type of lighting instruments you use, tungsten, hmi, led, flo, so long as you use the same color temperature lights to light the screen as you do to gauge the lighting of your scene and subjects. I do a lot of greenscreen work, and my best "short" advice: 1.) Get as big a screen as you can afford. And get your subjects as far ...


4

When you take a photo with a Modern camera "usually" it's 4/3, I know you can change the aspect ratio, but that's not my point. I assume, that the sensors of DSLR cameras are the same ratio, because they are created for the purpose of creating photos, aren't they? Actually, no. Only low-end digital cameras (mostly point-and-shoot) use a 4/3 aspect ratio, ...


3

You can't do that. There is no tablet on the market (right now) that offers an HDMI input or any other physical display input. Your only option would be to stream compressed video over the USB (or Lightning on iPads) connection or Wifi to an app that displays that stream.


3

I can't help you with the set lighting but the look of the video is definitely achievable in post and in case of a modern camera you definitely have to do a lot in post to get a believable "retro" look. After Effects is recommendable due to many great plugins that help achieving specific looks but any editor that has good color tools on-board, a blur filter ...


3

Properties that are desired in these lenses are quiet operation, image stabilization, zoom construction that usually cover wide to short tele focal lenght and that have a constant aperture across that range. A perfocal design is good when using a zoom. These are a couple of general characteristics but they may be different for special applications. Quiet ...


3

First, while sensor temperature is a real thing that can result in elevated noise levels, I'm not aware of a sensor in recent history that had a heat related shutdown (outside of harsh conditions anyway) or that could accumulate enough heat to be a threat to the chip. Most of the non-sense out there about sensor's overheating is completely uninformed rumors ...


3

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


3

Other than what you mentioned, the only other alternative is to use a third party firmware that highlights the points of highest contrast. This gives you a better idea of what is focused on by highlighting the edges that are sharp in the LCD. MagicLantern offers this for most Canon cameras. I don't know if third party firmware for other DSLR makes has ...


3

My personal and very subjective recommendation list: A sufficient number of SD cards, battery packs and backup drives Editing software (consumer SW like Sony Movie Studio will probably do) Tripod with fluid head to allow smooth tilts and pans At least one affordable objective with at least 2.8 aperture. E.g. Canon EF 50mm 1:1.8, Canon EF 85mm f/1,8 or ...


3

Don't use auto white balance and use manual exposure. Auto white balance will guess at what is white and may shift while you are running video on some cameras (which makes sense since often people may move from one room to another while shooting or lighting conditions could change. Manual exposure will preserve luminosity. Auto exposure shouldn't change ...


3

For me it looks like you use Auto whitebalance. Try to set the whitebalance to one particular value depend of the light you shoot.


3

No, the D750 is not a good alternative for an avid videographer, at least not if you want the advantages Magic Lantern offers. ML isn't available for Nikon. The reason has nothing to do with the technical advantages of either platform, you can get models of camera that are fairly close in that regard. The problem is that Nikon does not have anything ...


3

I just finished working with a company that has had several very successful Kickstarters. IMHO, lighting and audio are more important than camera type for this type of video, as long as you have a pro-sumer camera that shoots decent 1080p HD. Many successful campaigns have been shot on a DSLR with a stock lens. If you want to buy an additional lens then ...


3

DSLRs tend to have much larger image sensors than camcorders, which tends to mean much less depth of field (DOF) for a given field of view. Shallow DOF is great for isolating subjects from their background, but it's a nightmare when you actually want the subject and its context to be in focus together. Most DLSR lenses have a limited zoom ratio and/or ...


3

Theoretically Current DSLRs use H.264 compression for their video. Optimizing an already compressed image without losing quality is something commonly done for GIF, PNG or JPEG still images, and while it's theoretically possible to optimise compression in existing video files, currently no one bothered to develop the software to do so. The only solution left ...


3

Firstly, that camera has a 29 minute 59 second recording limit. If your speaker goes for longer than this it may not be suitable. Apparently this is due to some countries charging higher import duties for video cameras, but if it records less than 30 minutes it's not classed as a video camera. Yeah, I know. The DSLR will probably cope better with low light ...


2

just figured it out woth magic lantern. You wanna turn on frame rate override, and change thr timing clock from its perfect number to something slightly above or below the usual 4200 or whatever it is. I got a true frame rate of 26.007, and a flicker free video of a lcd screen. Bam!


2

Unfortunately, there aren't really cheap options to do this. You can approximate it using a crane or a stabilization rig (like a SteadiCam Jr), but both of those is still going to cost you hundreds of dollars. For horizontal movement, the cheapest option is probably to use a more basic track and roll it by hand. You can use a motion control unit to get ...


2

You can probably do it directly through the EOS software. It is possible to get a live video stream from the camera over the USB connection. Note that USB2 is not going to be able to carry a full quality HDMI stream though. This is why the Intensity is USB3. It requires USB3 because the bandwidth requirements for the quality level it is working at ...


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