5

Very broadly speaking, you have a much easier experience obtaining permission if you are not making money from someone else's content. Most copyright laws recognise 'fair use' -- a small quote or a clip that is proof of someone else having said something. It is customary and advisable to put such clip in a box or window to show that the content is being ...


4

Unless you/they have a contract which states that it was a" work for hire" and they have ownership of the raw media, the videographer or photographer owns the rights to the raw footage. The client has paid for the finished product, but that is all, and it is questionable if they even have the right to take excerpts from or re-edit it without your permission, ...


4

You can use a file storage service like: DropBox Google Drive Microsoft SkyDrive Apple iCloud You can restrict access of your files there to a handful of persons. For example on Google Drive, when you share a file with some people, it asks you for their email addresses. It then sends an email to all those people with a "secret" link. In theory, this ...


4

If you don't want your stuff to be stolen, don't put it on the internet People need to be able to watch your video on their computers. For that purpose, it needs to be downloaded to their computers. If it's on their computer, they have it. There are ways to protect your video, but those are not failsafe and will inevitably result in a poor user experience....


4

It's a quite complex topic, but yes, when dealing with non-royalty-free technologies you are in some cases required to pay royalties to the patent holders, depending on your usage. This usually applies when you are the distributor of the video/audio content, but it depends from technology to technology. Patent pools are groups of companies that claim fees ...


3

Copyright law here says that the person who shoots the footage owns the footage. The only way to change this is if you sign a work for hire contract which says that the production company owns the copyright and that they'll pay you in exchange for your work and copyright. If they didn't pay you then they breached their contract. If there was no contract then ...


3

No, one offending video won't taint your entire channel. At my workplace, sometimes the youtube algorithms will mistakenly flag some music to which we own the rights as copyright protected. When such an event occurs, the video is automatically un-monetized, and we are asked to demonstrate that we have rights to the music. The video still plays, we just don'...


3

Yes, that's the core condition of the CC-ShareAlike license. Any derivative or work that contains the image has to be distributed under the same license for the entire video. Even if you create a long video with only one image that is licensed under CC-SA, you will have to use the same license. Using a different license would be a violation to the terms of ...


3

This is really going to come down to what the terms of the EULA is. It should outline what rights you have to use the Apple provided contents. Most likely you would be fine as included assets are typically intended for reproduction. It might be trickier if you were going to sell copies, but a commercial is probably ok. As far as using it as commercial ...


3

Is such video a derivate work of the images? Yes. If the answer is yes, then how one could include images in a video without making it a derivate work? You can't. At least not if the images are distributed under a CC-licence. Even if it's just one image (or song), you have to follow the ShareAlike clause. Also, if you use multiple works by other artists ...


3

I am not a lawyer and it may depend on where you are located, but generally speaking, even if you weren't being paid, this is technically a violation of copyright that you could be sued over. It is highly unlikely that anyone would come after you for it if they only use it privately, but if it was, say, published to youtube, then there would be more chance ...


2

You can download royalty-free songs for video production or poems free for video production. It is no charge


2

Typically, there shouldn't be a legal problem using any transitions\effects\clip art that come with any software package. That is what they are there for. Ultimately, you will need to read the license agreement and possibly contact Apple to find out what your actual rights are.


2

Anything published anywhere is automatically copyrighted, with all rights reserved to the author or publisher. The source of this video is known, so your obvious choice here is to contact the publisher and ask permission. This is a promotional video, so it's very possible that they will permit your use, with proper attribution or for a small fee. But you ...


2

For this, you'll really need to see a lawyer to determine if the original re-mix has sufficient rights to the song to place their remix under Creative Commons in the first place. If they do, then it depends what Creative Commons license they used. As long as it allows commercial usage (not a NC license) then you would be ok as long as you followed the ...


2

You could host the videos yourself. I use a piece of software called Plex. Basically, you set up a media server at home, which you can then share with people by sending them an invite. In effect, you're giving people passworded access to your media server. You can even choose which videos are shared with which people by creating categories, and then ...


2

It really depends on whether your video constitutes a collective work or a derivative work. The legal deed for the CC-BY-SA licence makes this distinction: * "Collective Work" means a work, such as a periodical issue, anthology or encyclopedia, in which the Work in its entirety in unmodified form, along with a number of other contributions, ...


2

Public domain material isn't subject to any restrictions -- legally you can do anything you like with it. It would be respectful (but not required) to honor the intent of the material and not distort its meaning, and to credit the source.


2

Having licensed music for videos I've produced; from having custom tracks re-recorded by one of Audio Jungles top artists (1 Million in Sales); to one hit wonders who had radio airplay; to even Katy Perry... You need to find out what Label the album is under; meaning, who owns the rights. Blackmill will have no say, unless they own the masters which I ...


2

In the US, fair use, the doctrine of copyright law that permits limited use of copyrighted material without needing to obtain permission first, is measured by four criteria. It doesn't matter whether the work you are including or creating is music, text, or a newscast, the same four criteria apply. The purpose and character of the work you are including the ...


1

First let's cover the Norway Part... Just because you are in Norway doesn't give you protection. In 2007 Norway signed the TRIPS agreement which is comprehensive multilateral agreement on intellectual property. This agreement basically extended the powers of the Berne Convention treaty that established a basic standard of copyright protection. Norway is ...


1

According to this site, Norway does allow exceptions to author's rights for educational purposes, but it does not expand on what said requirements are. You should probably talk to a lawyer in your jurisdiction for up to date information on your local jurisdiction.


1

Googling for "mp4 metadata editor" brings up lots of candidates. Many of these will search online databases for tagging DVD movie rips, a feature I don't think you're looking for, but they also let you add and edit tags in most common container formats like MP4. Two you might look at are MP3Tag (yes, MP3) and MetaX/MetaZ.


1

Something is only properly called "public domain" if the copyright has expired, and there aren't any patents or trademarks applicable either. Many old books are now in the public domain, so it's legal to grab whole paragraphs from them without attribution. It would still be plagiarism to claim that you wrote it yourself, though. (Not that you're ...


1

IANAL, but I'd guess that if you have to circumvent any DRM just to copy clips of the movie (which you probably do), then it's probably not OK. Try taking a screenshot of the movie playing in iTunes (ctrl-shift-3 or ctrl-shift-4 on mac). If it shows up black on your desktop, or if you get an error message, then you probably don't have rights to share it. ...


1

No you do not. While in all practicality the answer is Yes; but there is a very important assumption that many people are making. The condition of CC-SA licence is that if you distribute the derivative work you must distribute it under the terms compatible with this licence. Firstly this implies that there is a chance to find a different licence, which is ...


1

Actors certainly have no rights to the footage itself, without other agreement, that would belong to the cameraman shooting the footage, however, just because they don't have claim to the footage doesn't mean they don't have claim to the contents of the footage. The writers most likely have copyright for the script content they produced, the director has ...


1

From the by-sa legal terminology: Section 1 – Definitions. Adapted Material means material subject to Copyright and Similar Rights that is derived from or based upon the Licensed Material and in which the Licensed Material is translated, altered, arranged, transformed, or otherwise modified in a manner requiring permission under the Copyright and ...


1

Often short clips for demonstration purposes qualify as fair use, however you can't generally use more than a few seconds. Even video clips that have been released on the Internet are not necessarily safe to use as the content may still require you to have a license. Your best bet is to contact a lawyer since fair use varies greatly from jurisdiction to ...


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