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I am not very certain that I understand your question, but if you want to shift the color-grade of your image away from the orange, you can use the temperature to shift it towards blue, effectively making your image less orange. The temperature setting is available in any popular grading-tool, such as lumetri, resolve or nuke. Another option might be to ...


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The question is impossible to answer in a general way. If a camera offers to record in RGB, it is likely using a completely different codec that could be better or worse. Very few cameras will actually record video in RGB, so if you see the option in a menu, it may be referring to something very particular about the color handling of video on that specific ...


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I have this issue forever...found a solution thanks to this website https://isaac-molina.com/downloads/ download his luts aplly the correct lut to an adjustment layer placed on top of you project (in my case convert mrec 709 g2.4 to sRGB g2.2) and then you get to see what you get as output, but inside the project viewer, so you can grade correctly. Good luck


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I think your eyes acclimatise to the ambient colour temperature in the room, so one tends not to notice that whites are looking warmer under incandescent light, unless there is a cooler light source nearby to compare it with. If you don't plan to do any colour correction in post, then you should shoot as close as you can to your desired output. But this is ...


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You could try GBDeflicker to see if it improves the footage. They have a free demo. It is designed for smoothing out time-lapses (and is good at this), but it might work on archive video?


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Four big factors in your results... About 10 years ago, I was using HDV, which is not only 4:2:0, but is actually 1440 pixels wide, stretched to 1920 wide. At the time, I wasn't always happy with the results, though recently I went back and revisited it with more experience and better tools and I was actually happy with the results. Four things to consider: ...


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"Good enough"? Sure. I wouldn't love to work with subsampled footage for keying, though. You want to maximise resolution, minimise or avoid subsampling and avoid spill. If your screen is well lit, you got the best circumstances. So yeah, on paper, a chromatically subsampled file will give you more artefacts and jagged edges in your matte compared ...


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Since I cannot use hyperlinks in comments, here is the gist of my research: This answer on a reddit post suggests, that the reason for the color-shift is the way illegal and legal colors are handled. So maybe the "broadcast colors" effect can help limit the color-range to the legal range? I'd recommend giving that a quick shot. If that doesn't work,...


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