5

Two thoughts: Go to images.google.com and search for "gold". Find something you think is gold-colored, check its RGB values, and then use that as a target for your gold. Many editing programs have the ability to aim one color toward another, so you can select a range of colors that your camera thinks of as gold and then aim it toward what you think of as ...


5

Applications such as FCPX and Adobe Creative Cloud actually ship with a wide variety of stylized LUTs, so if you use either of those you can play around with them. Most LUTs will specify what they expect as input, and many I have seen are designed to work either with LOG or REC709. (There are many LOG formats out there--Arri Log-C, RED RedLogFilm, Sony ...


4

Method 1 First, with the Premiere project closed, move the original files that you're editing with to a new folder or other location. Open your project and it will warn you of missing files. Click the Relink others automatically checkbox and then hit Locate. Navigate to the folder with the new graded footage, find the first clip and press Ok. It will then ...


4

As you know, the contrast function darkens dark colors further and lightens light colors further. Software without a pivot parameter assume that the point where darkening becomes lightening is exactly in the middle, at 0.5 (for a color range of 0 to 1). Those with a pivot parameter allow to move the pivot point up or down. Shifting the pivot slightly down (e....


4

My statement that the effect looks the same was incorrect. The use of these sliders is explained in the manual, in "Primary Grading Controls" -> "Color Wheels Palette" -> "RGB Lift/Gamma/Gain Sliders" (page 725 in the v14 manual). Quoting: ... These three controls allow easy Y-only adjustments to contrast, where an increase in contrast results in ...


4

The functionality of editing vs color grading vs compositing software is overlapping since every professional software can do a bit of everything. But they are experts in their own domain. Resolve has finer color controls (1), but also some functionality that you won't find in compositing software (2). Will they merge some day? This does depend on the job ...


3

There are a few important things to consider: Lighting is perhaps the most important aspect to creating a filmic image. A lot of filmmakers like to use natural light such as Innaritu on The Revenant. I remember from the BTS that they had maybe 2 hours a day for a week or so to film the 3 minute scene because he only wanted to use natural light. In the ...


3

You ask what it does: Speedgrade is a color grading / correcting tool. Davinci Resolve is another, and there are others still. They allow you to adjust the characteristics of a video on a shot-by-shot basis. It's never necessary to use any color grading tool, but you'd do so when you want to match scenes from different sources or shot under different ...


3

That's the moiré pattern, which is caused when the camera debayers an image with fine details: Wikipedia about the Bayer Filter (see the Artifacts section) Many cameras have this problem, some more, some less. The best solution is to get to know the sensibility of your camera regarding moiré and - when you have objects like bricks, roofs, fine-detailed ...


3

This announcement article dated January 11, 2017 indicates that there will be an upgrade to the app FiLMiC Pro which may accommodate what you are looking for. Note that the FiLMic Pro App Store web page indicates the latest release is 12/23/2016 - I do not know when the update the article speaks of will be available: The forthcoming update will introduce ...


3

There is actually a specific option for this in Resolve. In your primaries pane (bottom left of the color tab) navigate to the "rgb mixer" tab. In the top right of the tab, click the options menu (3 dots) Check the 'make monochrome' command. Now you'll see 6 from the 9 rgb mixer bars turn gray and you'll be able to use the other 3 to mix you black and ...


3

Use Resolve, it is far superior to FCPX for grading. This is my workflow, since I always shoot in RAW with the Blackmagic Cinema Camera. I know there are ways to do this using XML, but I've run into issues with that when I segment a larger clip in FCPX and then bring it back to resolve it will then have each of those clips as individuals, instead of the ...


3

DaVinci Resolve seems to be an industry standard software for color grading that exists as a free version. Here is a tutorial on how to use keyframes to animate color grading that worked for me:


2

In Lightworks, there's the selective color correction tool. By moving the sliders like this you can select the shadows (luma slider) and desaturate them: By clicking "Reveal" you can see which parts of the image are going to be changed. With much thanks to the guys at the Lightworks forum. Source: Lightworks forum: Desaturate shadows


2

I would look at some of the tutorials on YouTube. There are plenty of them. If you want to get into grading; you can jump right in as long as you are shooting RAW; or at the very least; 4:2:2. If you're shooting 4:4:4; you have a lot of flexibility. Resolve's DaVinci Line has some nice low cost entry options that include control surfaces; I personally ...


2

The scopes are objective and absolute measures of the levels in your image. They aren't susceptible to the vagaries of human perception—colours and levels looking different depending on context—and they work even on un-calibrated monitors. Scopes are particularly important where viewing conditions aren't optimal - that's why pro cameras will usually have a ...


2

Try searching for "LED Neon Tube". Nowadays LEDs are so common for venue lighting, maybe the set designers might went that route. If this is fluorescent, they could be white fluorescent bulbs wrapped in theatrical gel roll material, such as this. For the power supply (called a ballast) and housing, you can buy fluorescent bulb track lighting from any ...


2

A log curve is a mathematical transfer function. SONY have defined a LOG curve (as many vendors do) that imagines future/alternative sensors having larger electron well capacity (higher clipping) and lower noise (lower clipping) than your current silicon design supports. In other words, you are seeing where your sensor's designs fits into an idealized LOG ...


2

Definitely proRes 422HQ. While you won't gain anything by encoding in a higher quality codec, what you will do is avoid losing more. Proxy codecs are just that: stand-ins for the real content, their job is not to faithfully encode the material, it's to be lightweight and easy to play, so you can swap in the full quality copy later. Whoever it was that ...


1

The "banding" you are seeing is the levels of the three channels that make up a video signal. It isn't an 8-bit artifact. In the upper left and bottom scopes, the white/grey trace is the luminance channel and the others are the color difference channels. In the histogram in the upper right, you are seeing the white and RGB values. You can switch between ...


1

The choice of codec will largely depend on what you're doing with the material. Your problem is that there just aren't enough colours in 8-bit colour space to give you a smooth gradient over the size of the frame. Problem is that if you want to deliver it on the internet you're pretty much locked in to h.264 (or I guess webm or ogv, but same deal). You can ...


1

Yes, you will lose information from the grade if you save as 8-bit. Here's a thought experiment to illustrate. Say your original red level for a pixel was 128 out of 256 (00001111 / 11111111), and then in Resolve you grade it (using the internal 32-bit floating point colour in Resolve) to be a little bit brighter, say 128.25. Now you'll need to save it in ...


1

If you do a primary color correction on your video to get it normalized (this is assuming your footage looks correct in terms of exposure, white balance, etc); I'd add the following filters to achieve that look without any plugins... You would have to play with the parameters; I haven't seen your footage, so I can't say how strong a filter would need to be ...


1

In addition to what @Geordie said, keep in mind that LUT files can contain floating point values which means that they can describe values that would be between the 8-bit values in a PNG file. Additionally, they can describe values above 1 or below 0 for HDR workflows.


1

They're essentially the same thing with different storage layouts. A 2D LUT is just slices of a 3D LUT laid out in an image. People use formats like Cube becasue that's what the software supports. Because formats like Cube were invented before hardware acceleration it was probably just easier to load data already stored as 3D because the color transform ...


1

Fcp .xml is limited in features. Although more powerful than other EDL types, most of Premiere's transformation and animation properties are not supported. You can read more about its capabilities here. However it appears Premiere CC neither exports the xml file as recommended by Apple nor in its latest version. I'd suggest collapse your timeline and make ...


1

In turns out all I had to do was grade in DaVinci Resolve and right click on the graded clip's thumbnail in the color environment and select Generate 3D LUT (CUBE). Then in Adobe Premiere CC add the Lutemtri effect to an adjustment layer, expand basic correction, Browse for Input LUT.


1

Add a new custom generator and set the colour to white. Add your media above. In this example, I will use a photo. Apply the Draw Mask to your image. Click to add 4 control points, then set the control point positions using the inspector. Choose B-Spline as the Shape Type, then set the Feather and Falloff as appropriate.


1

The easiest way would be to use 3 way color corrector. Do a first pass color correction to get it to a standard look. Then do a 2nd pass within the same filter (lower down on the filter) to grade. Or get Resolve (paid version), or Color Finesse, which is also very good.


1

The MOV you exported from Resolve is tagged as Rec 601 (despite being UHD). So, I transcoded your MOV using the command below, preserving all color characteristics and uploaded that to Youtube. Downloaded YT's transcoded video and compared it to the MOV, and in ffplay, VLC or Potplayer, they look the same. ffmpeg -i Untitled.mov -crf 18 -...


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