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9

Seeing that in the text of your question you have started discussing other utilities, i will assume that you are not interested in sticking with ffmpeg, but rather in getting the job done. In my experience with libav and MTS i have had no problems with the framerate, the files get remuxed perfectly. I have just attempted the following with one of my files: ...


7

What is your definition of huge and what is your definition of high quality? Size is directly related to compression and compression is directly inversely related to quality for the most part. Some amount of compression can be had for free using lossless compression or near free with more efficient pattern finding for lossy compression, but for the most ...


5

As per this ffmpeg bug Interlaced H.264 packets are split causing MP4 STTS when remuxing a mpeg-ts containing interlaced H.264 into mp4, both fields of each video frame are split into seperate packets. Software such as Mediainfo uses the STTS to determine the frame rate. It will show as 50fps instead of 25fps The frame rate mismatch reported here ...


4

Video is practically never stored uncompressed because the data rates are insane if they were. Each image in a video is 1920 by 1080 pixels and takes 3 bytes per pixel (one each for red, green and blue). That's 6.2 megabytes per frame. There are 24 frames in a second, that's roughly 150 megabytes per second for 24p video. That's 9 gigabytes per minute. ...


4

You might want to try to enforce the original frame rate by using -r 29.97. FFmpeg is probably trying to adjust the framerate for some reason. Your syntax is otherwise correct and shouldn't produce that error. Regarding your third question. Simply not possible. You can omit frames when using codecs that encode frames individually but thats not the case with ...


4

Both files that don't play feature Opus as the audio codec. As per this site, Opus is not one of the supported audio codecs. Transcode the audio: ffmpeg -i in.mkv -c:v copy out.mkv


4

Are you sure the 8k videos on your computer are actually h.264, and not h.265? The max resolution of h.264 level 5.2 is still 4096x2305. To convert beyond that in Premiere, you need to chose HEVC (h.265) as the format in the export settings dialog. The HEVC stands for High Efficiency Video Coding, and you might have that confused with "advanced video ...


3

HDV camera, right? It's not untypical for cameras to claim higher resolution than they actually scan. In such cases you have to look at the different aspect ratios involved: pixel, frame, display, sample. Here's a post that discusses this, or google "HDV aspect ratio". And here's a link to the spec from the HDV consortium. It's essentially anamorphic. The ...


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...


3

As Professor Sparkles has correctly pointed out (I've just checked and confirm) — the MediaInfo tool can extract some metadata from these files. Here is a sample output from one of mine: General Complete name : /Volumes/CAM_SD/PRIVATE/AVCHD/BDMV/CLIPINF/00119.CPI Format : Blu-ray Clip info File ...


3

Wonderful ffmpeg command line utility is the solution. Just check their documentation, but something like the following will probably work for your case: ffmpeg -i video.mts video%05d.png This will take your video, and create video00001.png, video00002.png... files in the same folder. You can find a lot of guides for ffmpeg, or ask here for a specific ...


3

The usual tool recommended for this is JES Deinterlacer, which apparently has an adaptive method of finding and removing the 'smear' frames. I haven't used it myself. The reason this is an issue is that the field cadence used for PF24 is (stupidly, IMO) different from the typical telecine cadence, which is what most 'inverse telecine' algos detect and ...


2

You can achieve all your goals using ffmpeg and sox, these are command line tools for video and audio processing respectively. I can not provide you with a ready to roll solution, but here are examples for a pre-roll video, audio noise reduction, text overlay and conversion from AVCHD.


2

It sounds like there is a problem with your Dolby Decoder for the AC3 audio stream. If you are on a trial or pirated copy then you may not have been able to activate the AC3 decoder that normally comes with Premiere. (Adobe has to pay Dolby for each copy used.) If you are on a legit copy, something may have become corrupt with the Dolby decoder. Try doing ...


2

When you ask how something will 'look' you're in the realm of the subjective. Things 'look' different to experienced professionals than they might to the average viewer. But still, the 1080p video will not be as good no matter what you view it on. When you encode at a low bit rate you aren't removing pixels, you're mostly removing high frequencies. Doing ...


2

There is no way around needing more data rate to capture that much video information. It sounds like the camera probably isn't actually capable of delivering 1080P/60 but that they use a very low quality version so they can slap the label on the box. Data rates are generally measured in Mb(bits)/sec rather than MB/s, but even if your suggested rate ...


2

I know this is an old question, but it just popped up again in the feed so it's new to me. (-: One thing I don't see mentioned is field order. This is an interlaced file, so that's a consideration. The OP mentions the frames "quivering back and forth" which is always a flag for incorrect field order. If the video is otherwise OK except for the 'quivering', ...


2

the way I do this from my Canon 7D / 100D is pop the CF or SD card into my Mac and copy the whole card to a folder with a very simple structure Project_Name_Date RAW_Cards Camera_Name_Card00x Camera_Name_Card00x If I would add in a DATE Folder under the Poject_Name for multiple days/Dates, When I get back to the studio to start editing I can ...


2

Try those calculators, they should do the trick. http://www.digitalrebellion.com/webapps/videocalc


2

I know only VideoReDo and SolveigMM Video Splitter, but they are not full-featured video editors. Both are not free.


2

In the Media View window, select all the clips you want to change. Right click one of the selected clips and choose "Clip Attributes". In the Video portion of the Clip Attributes, tell Resolve what you want it to do.


2

Generally, MP4 is better for compatibility, whereas AVCHD provides the better quality. MP4 (which by the way can mean a million different things, in this case it probably refers to MPEG-4 Part 14) files will be compatible with most devices and media players as is, and will be smaller in size compared to AVCHD. This is the option I'd recommend if you wanted ...


2

I will answer only to the 'interlaced' part. Yes, it's a thing from the past. Deinterlaced video always will be looking worse than progressive. It's like shooting through the cracked lens and then trying to fix the footage on post. In any circumstances don't shoot a scene with chromakey in interlaced mode. I won't go into details but the results will be ...


2

AVCHD as a format is a combination of containers, file naming conventions, and directory structure. It is not inherently better or worse than any other container types. Interlaced video is a thing of the past, forget about it. If your final product is 30p, you can shoot at 30p, edit at 30p and render at 30p. Or you can shoot at 60p and edit at 30p - this ...


2

FFmpeg can use x264 to output to 8K. Basic template: ffmpeg -i 4KfromPremiere.mp4 -vf scale=7680x4320 -crf 20 out.mp4


1

You don't mention either how (or IF?) you are editing anything here, or what forms of storage, distribution, archiving, etc you anticipate? You are probably correct that MP4 is a more compatible distribution format, but distribution format does not necessarily have to be identical with recording and editing format. I would not anticipate any issue with ...


1

I have Lumix G6 with same options (MP4 and AVCHD). Some things about AVCHD: It brake video into multiple files, but since you gonna edit them in Premiere, you can handle this. Sometimes Adobe Premiere have problems with audio at AVCHD. If Premiere don't see audio in AVCHD files, that mean you have problems with your license. You shall reactivate it. And no ...


1

Don't do anything to the files, Premiere Pro should be able to handle them. Just copy them to a USB drive and hand them off to your editor. NEVER convert your video files prior to editing. You'll lose quality for no reason. If the Mac won't open them, try another media player such as VLC media player. For a PC, I'd say you may need to install Quicktime as ...


1

It's possible that with certain Panasonic or MTS-specific software, the associated files are useful. I've heard of situations where Premiere won't import the footage correctly without the full folder structure. I don't have any MTS folders here at the moment to verify for sure, but it's most likely just metadata that the camera recorded. That being said, I'...


1

I used ffmpeg (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FFmpeg, http://ffmpeg.org/) to exchange the container format while keeping the original video and audio data. You can also use it to transcode the video, but many of the stream formats work in other container formats as well, so the -vcodec copy -acodec copy parameters will keep the original quality. I used ...


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