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7

FFMpeg has an option to modify the aspect ratio of a video file without actually modifying the video, see http://www.ffmpeg.org/ffmpeg-all.html#Video-Options For example, in your case, the desired aspect ratio is 720 / 480 = 1.5 (3:2) (which is NOT 4:3, it should be 540 in that case) So your command line may look like: ffmpeg -i input_file.avi -c copy -...


5

Create a sequence that is 720x720, drag the clip on to the timeline, and in the canvas window use the arrow tool v to double click the layer which brings up the layer controls. Position it the way you want, export. I'm pretty sure Premiere doesn't scale non-uniformly by default. If it does for some reason, you'll probably want to use the conform options ...


4

This answer assumes that the video that you're editing is already in a 16:9 ratio, otherwise when you export there will be black bars on the sides or above and below your video. A 16:9 ratio is the standard for HDTV and Full HD. You're probably familiar with the Youtube video qualities - 360p, 480p, 720p, 1080p, etc. These are all 16:9. Therefore, all you ...


4

First off, 2K is not 1440p, it is 2048 x 1080p. 4K is 4096 x 2160p. (Note that UHD = 3840 x 2160p...4K and UHD are like US and Canadian dollars--they are both dollars, but they have different values.) It's simple math: when you have a straight line and you make it twice as long, the new length is 2x the original length. When you have a rectangular area ...


4

525/60 digitized SD video according to Rec. 601 is indeed 720 pixels wide, 480 pixels high, including some blanking on the sides. Digital equivalent of 625/50 is 720x576. In both cases, frame aspect ratio is 4:3, this simply means that the pixels are not square. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-1_(Sony) To make matters more complex, only a subset of the ...


3

When you take a photo with a Modern camera "usually" it's 4/3, I know you can change the aspect ratio, but that's not my point. I assume, that the sensors of DSLR cameras are the same ratio, because they are created for the purpose of creating photos, aren't they? Actually, no. Only low-end digital cameras (mostly point-and-shoot) use a 4/3 aspect ratio, ...


3

AVIdemux can do that when encoding, but i cannot remember if it allows you to do that when you chose to copy the stream without reencoding (you don't want to reencode, since it will not only be time consuming, but also lossy). If you are willing to change it from AVI to MKV (VLC and most other players will have no problem playing it) you can do that with ...


3

There are 2 different things: The real width and height of frames (in pixels) - see the green part of the folowing picture. The displayed width and height (during the playback) - see the blue part of the same picture. The problem arose in old bad days, when the resolution of devices (number of pixels in the image) was very low, but the required ratio of ...


2

The player panic you are experiencing might be due to the checksum in the ogg header. If you recalculate the checksum for the whole header with your new value you might get a valid file again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogg#Page_structure Though I dont know all too much about the ogg and vorbis specs. For this kind of low level work its always a good idea ...


2

I have to thank @ProfessorSparkles for getting me to this solution, which doesn't require saving and reimporting, or making a duplicate of the source footage. Here are the steps: 1) I started with the 2 clips I'm using in the same bin. 2) Drag the landscape-oriented clip to the timeline. That creates a sequence with landscape orientation in the bin. 3) ...


2

You need to make sure your artwork is at least 720x1280 in size. Then open a video editing package like Adobe Premiere, Final Cut, or an animation package like After Effects. Create a project with a canvas of 720 x 1280 pixels, and drag your artwork into it. Make the timeline 10 seconds in duration (set in and out points on your timeline). Export your ...


2

You will need to work within the title safe areas when burning to DVD as depending on what the final player will be, there might be overscan which will/can crop anything out that is not within this field. as for the pixel things, I'm not to sure.


2

Using ffmpeg, ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf "scale=1920:1080:flags=lanczos,setsar=1" output.mp4 This will stretch the video to 1920x1080. ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf "scale=-1:1080:flags=lanczos,setsar=1,pad=1920:1080:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2" output.mp4 This will keep the aspect ratio but place black bars on the left and right. The flag in the scale filter determines ...


2

Unfortunately, the screen is showing the whole frame. That is all that your camera recorded. It did not record anything to the left or right of what you see. On YouTube, where many people shoot their videos in a vertical format as you did, it is common to enlarge the video to the full frame width - which will cut off the top and bottom of the video - and ...


2

I did not manage to solve the source problem, but I found how to overcome the consequences. It is indeed possible to edit the aspect ratio of the rendered video using ffmpeg: ffmpeg -i <INPUT_FILE> -aspect 4:3 -c copy <OUTPUT_FILE>


1

This has already been mentioned above however scaling the video in the background roughly (300%) and adding a gaussian blur (soft) is common practice to achieve said effect.


1

It means that the ratio between the width and the height of the content (in pixels) should be the specified one. Specifically, for a video you need to have an aspect ratio (technically, a DAR - display aspect ratio) of exactly 1:1, so the width of the video should be the same as the height of the video. In other words, the video should be square. As an ...


1

Having seen the sample, this is the command ffmpeg -i in.avi -vf pad=720:576:0:144,setdar=4/3 -target pal-dvd out.mpg The video is square-pixel, so scaling is not required. The frame should be treated as 4:3, not 16:9 (which isn't the right ratio for this movie anyway). For widescreen playback in the PAL standard, your rendered raster has to be 1024x576. ...


1

Videon It's a great app for the iPhone. Not only does it have some great camera features; like stabilization, and manual exposure/WB, but you can also use it's post feature on any clip in your Photos folder. You can crop, change aspect ratio, framerate, adjust rotation, pretty much anything... along with a ton of filters; color correcting tools and so ...


1

You can use a combo of the scale and setsar filters. ffmpeg -i hdv-input.m2t -vf "scale=iw*sar:ih,setsar=1" -crf 28 -c:a aac -b:a 80k -ac 1 -movflags +faststart h-264-out.mp4 The scaler width to set to current width x sample/pixel aspect. If it's already 1, it amounts to new width = old width. I've added a setsar afterwards to ensure the output SAR is 1. ...


1

In project properties, set your pixel aspect ratio to 1.333 as well. Furthermore, make sure that when you right-click a video on your timeline that both resample is disabled, and try fiddling around with the "maintain aspect ratio" option. I have a hunch that it has got to do with these settings. Try using different formats/encoders as well to see what ...


1

One way to deal with different aspect ratios is to take footage that is not as wide as your output format and duplicate it in another layer. Increase the scale on this other layer and blur the image, then put the original over it. This produces a nice coherent effect where the area outside the original footage is filled with colors that are from the original ...


1

Okay, after some reasoning and research I think I understand what happens. Basically, the sensor is fixed in size, but the lens is too. Which means the only way to get a wider sample to fit the image to 16:9 is to crop down the image on the sensor to about 720x405 pixels, each pixel catching a sample of ratio 64:45 (SAR). The image is then stretched ...


1

You can use FFmpeg, a free command line tool to do this: ffmpeg -i input.mkv -vf pad=1920:1080:0:140,subtitles=filename.srt -crf 20 -c:a copy out.mkv The subtitles filter accepts ASS styling parameters, such as font size and margins.


1

The most relevant keyword to add to your search is psychophysics, which is "the analysis of perceptual processes by studying the effect on a subject's experience...". More directly, there's this SMPTE paper Searching for the Perfect Aspect Ratio. The paper visits some of the research conducted on different aspect ratios and its take-away is The research ...


1

Assuming both MKVs are rips of NTSC DVDs, these are the commands you need: For 4:3 video ffmpeg -i "input43.mkv" -vf "scale=640x480,setsar=1,pad=854:480:107:0" [etc..] For 16:9 video ffmpeg -i "input169.mkv" -vf "scale=854x480,setsar=1" [etc..] (Note H.264, the codec you are likely using, needs dimensions to be even, so specifying 853 as width will lead ...


1

FLV is an Adobe container for streaming video. Historically, FLVs usually contained a variety of codecs (such as FLV1, Sorenson..etc) but nowadays it's usually H.264. Which is to say, the video may already be MP4 compatible. You may not need to recompress the video at all, and could simply transfer it from a FLV container to MP4, bypassing Premiere. ffmpeg ...


1

The program panel's sequence preview is mainly determined by the sequence settings. You can change those via Sequence → Sequence Settings. However, some parameters of a sequence can not be altered after creation, including resolution and aspect ratio (an exception is the automated adjustment of the sequence settings that is offered to you when you drop a ...


1

This should work universally. ffmpeg -i in.avi -y -pix_fmt yuv420p -an -qscale 1 -vcodec libx264 -vf setsar=1,crop=in_w:in_h-64:0:64 out.mp4


1

You can use the Free FFmpeg Mux/Demux... Type onto ffmpeg/bin the following ffmpeg.exe -i artwork.jpg -vcodec h264 -s 720x1280 -aspect 16:9 -ss 0 -t 10 -b 3072k outputvideo.mp4


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