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Production codecs with alpha channel support Apple ProRes 4444 / Apple ProRes 4444 XQ From the Manual: Apple ProRes 4444 and Apple ProRes 4444 XQ are ideal for the exchange of motion graphics media because they are virtually lossless. They are also the only Apple ProRes codecs that support alpha channels. DNxHD From Wikipedia: lossy high-...


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File > Add to Render Queue > Output mode > Format 'Quicktime' / Channels 'RGB + Alpha' See if that works for you!


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Yes, for the Quicktime output module, choose to output RGB + Alpha using PNG or Animation codec. In Media Encoder, choose Depth as 32 Bit after selecting the same codecs as above.


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The MP4 format doesn't support an Alpha channel. The question you've asked is very broad, and I've tried to answer to a certain extent below. However you may need to decide what route you're going to try and then researching that route or asking further, more specific questions. The file types that currently support an Alpha (transparency) channel are FLV,...


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The alphaextract/alphamerge filters are meant for this. Since your alpha reference is already greyscale, we only need the alphamerge filter ffmpeg -i main.mp4 -i alpha.mp4 -filter_complex [0][1]alphamerge,format=yuva420p -c:v libvpx -auto-alt-ref 0 out.webm


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The lut filter expressions don't work with time. geq does. geq=r='(1-0.7*min((T-S)/D,1))*p(X,Y)':g={the same as r}:b={the same}:enable='gte(t,S)' S should be your start time in second. D is duration for the change in colours. T and p(X,Y) are variables and should be kept as is.


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The thing about masks is that you don't have to do them on every frame. To quickly do rotoscoping you let the computer do as much of the work as it can, by interpolating wherever possible. To mask out the hands with the pen tool, draw the mask for the first frame and then move as far along the timeline as you can until the point where the motion ...


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The alpha channel is a grayscale 2D image plane of the same size as the RGB image, and is used when overlaying (or blending) the image on top of another image. If the value of an alpha pixel is zero, then the corresponding RGB pixel is invisible when the image is overlaid. If the value is 255 (in an 8-bits per channel image), then the RGB pixel is fully ...


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As you may know from 3d packages depth information can be represented by a 2d Depth Map: In therory it's possible to detect the defocused area of an image via depth estimation methods and generating a depth map using this information. The algorithm splits up the image by finding all relevant edges, analizes the gradient values and compare these areas with ...


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I solved my own problem after some more trial and error. For awhile it looked like the fact that I was using Mental Ray shaders combined with general shaders was the problem, but that didn't really make sense so I kept tweaking. It turns out that an image plane I had tied to my camera was the problem. The image on the plane never rendered out, so I assumed ...


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