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12

I have Premiere/Media Encoder plugins for WebM and Theora (OGV) on GitHub. Check the ReadMe for download links. They're currently in beta. Brendan


9

I found that using Adobe Media Encoder is much easier when just cropping. Add the video to the queue and open the export settings. On the source tab you can crop the video and there you can also enter how many pixels to remove at each side. Remember to set the correct output size in the video tab on the right side. Here is a screenshot showing how i did it:


6

I would probably approach it by first measuring the size of the area that you want to crop to. This can be done by exporting a frame of the image and cropping in another program (like Photoshop). I would then create a sequence based on the other settings of the video, but alter the resolution of the sequence to be that of the portion of the video you ...


6

I think I've found the easiest way! Just crop the area you want. Go to the Export window without worrying about the black margins showing. Set the final resolution and export settings as you would want. (THIS IS THE IMPORTANT ONE) On the top left of the Export Window, there are two tabs; SOURCE and OUTPUT. Go to the Source Tab. On the left-most side, find ...


5

Applications such as FCPX and Adobe Creative Cloud actually ship with a wide variety of stylized LUTs, so if you use either of those you can play around with them. Most LUTs will specify what they expect as input, and many I have seen are designed to work either with LOG or REC709. (There are many LOG formats out there--Arri Log-C, RED RedLogFilm, Sony ...


5

There is a big difference between saving your project, then returning to the project to do some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting a media file, and exporting a media file from your project, importing the result into a new project, doing some additional changes, such as brightness adjustments, then exporting the result of ...


5

First off, if you have audio with your video (that you want to replace with your high-quality audio recording), then step #1 is to nudge the Zoom audio track to line up the impulse of the clap with the corresponding impulse of the scratch audio from the video file. To do that, you need to change the Timecode Display Format to Audio Samples. Once you do ...


5

Disclaimer: You didn't specify what program you are working with, so I assume you are using the current version of Premiere Pro. Assembly Workflow Your workflow is a common one for beginners. Back when I gave Premiere Pro introductory courses, I noticed many students start out like this, basically doing the assembly, cutting and arrangement of the footage ...


4

The technique you are looking for is called "motion tracking". Currently, FCPX doesn't have the ability to do this on its own, but you could use Apple Motion or Adobe After Effects to accomplish what you're after. Motion tracking, in general, follows patterns of pixels as they move around the scene. Depending on the effect you're after, and the demands of ...


4

I'll assume the camera op was fooling with the exposure? You'll need to key-frame color correction or AE's Auto Color function may work for you: https://helpx.adobe.com/after-effects/using/color-correction-effects.html If you go the CC route it may help to watch the YC waveform rather than the image itself. The Color Stabilizer effect may also work for ...


4

Are you sure the 8k videos on your computer are actually h.264, and not h.265? The max resolution of h.264 level 5.2 is still 4096x2305. To convert beyond that in Premiere, you need to chose HEVC (h.265) as the format in the export settings dialog. The HEVC stands for High Efficiency Video Coding, and you might have that confused with "advanced video ...


3

Unfortunately, there isn't a way to do this in Premiere in my experience. As far as I know, the only panels you can have multiple of are the Project and Sequence panels.


3

First, you need to adjust the metadata display. In the panel menu of the project panel, select the option Metadata display. In the Metadata Display window, activate the Rating display under Basic. This way, you get your five-star rating system right in the project panel (you can change the position of the rating column using drag-and-drop). Unfortunately, I ...


3

You can do this by using ffmpeg. Here are the steps: First do steps of the second method ("Use a frameserver") here. Beginning this step you should be streaming your Premier timeline through Debugmode and Avisynth on a specific IP and port. Now open a command line and run this ffmpeg command: ffmpeg -i frameserver.avs -f mpegts tcp://[IP address of your ...


3

If you want a hundred images at the same time, you need 100 layers. Often people will make a "pre-comp" which is a nested composition. You create a composition with only the images, then insert that composition into the main timeline. Any changes you make to the pre-comp will carry through even after you've laid it into your main video timeline. So your pre-...


3

When you set the number of frames per second of the sequence, you are describing the rate your rendered footage will playback, whatever that footage may be. If you have 600 frames and you set the sequence to play 60 frames/sec, you'll get 10 seconds of video. If you set the sequence to play at 6 frames per second, you'll get 100 seconds of video. 60 ...


3

Even though Michael Tiemanns answer is technically correct, it seems overly complicated given the description of your problem, as nested sequences may cause other problems and inconveniences down the road. So here are two other options that might help you: Grouping Select the three tracks you want to edit, then right-click → group (or press CTRL + G). The ...


3

This feature is supported through Adobe Media Encoder (AME) which is basically the background rendering engine for a number of the cloud apps including Premiere and AE. You need to set up watch folders. So long as AME is running, (I also believe you can have AME run as a background service now - but you may want to double check that) - and you have your ...


3

There's a script that does it for you (I just wrote it). You can get it (free, open source, WTFPL license) here on my blog. With the playhead in a gap, run the script and it will pull the layers after the gap along so the gap disappears. BTW all care, no responsibility. It works on my machine, but I've tested it like, twice. Save before using.


2

Oliver, have you tried changed your sequence settings to the new dimensions? You can also restrict/define dimensions in the export settings under 'Basic Video Settings'. Hope this helps!


2

To build on AJ's answer in a different direction, you may want to look at After Effects, which is a popular compositing tool. In After Effects, you can use the pen tool (somewhat like the lasso tool) to create a custom shape. With that shape, you can create a mask for the video. This mask can then show only the video inside of the shape. Further, the mask ...


2

If the element you need to put on the video doesn't move and the shot you are putting it in doesn't move, the best bet is to actually use Photoshop to extract the object you want to place in another video and put it in a file format that supports a transparent background (TGA, PSD, etc.) You can then import it to Premiere and place the image wherever you ...


2

Often by default the Audio Output checkbox is not checked in After Effects. When you go to add the composition to the render queue, make sure Audio Output is checked.


2

To answer your Questions in order: You can see the framerate of a clip or sequence by navigating to the metadata panel. It's usually one of the tabs in the upper left on the standard layout. If you don't see it, select Window -> Metadata. Generally, you should set sequences to match you source material. So if your camera records 720p @ 60 fps, stick to that....


2

This may get down-votes since it's so manual and doesn't have perfect video quality, but I'll offer it anyway. CREATING THE GENERIC TRANSITION Bring 30 clips into a project. Shrink the scale of all of them. Drag them onto the timeline so they're all playing at the same time. Position them in a grid. Export that project in the best possible quality you can. ...


2

As Jason says, if the camera is stationary throughout, this is probably doable. First, work out how much more scene you need to create, by opening the video in After Effects, and dragging it to one side until it looks right. Export a frame from that comp as a still (something lossless like TIFF is best). Open the still in Photoshop, and build your "clean ...


2

The easiest way to do this would be to cut your clip where you want the blurring effect to start/end.


2

That's the project window (not to be confused with the media browser, which you can use to browse your computer and import media assets into your project). You can add or remove assets to your selection by holding down CTRL / CMD while clicking on them.


2

Make sure the resolution in the sequence is the same as the resolution of your clip. Otherwise you'll need to scale the video to fit correctly.


2

I can't give you specific commands but since these are fairly short I'd extract the individual frames into a TIFF stack (or similar), then import them at the correct (7fps) frame rate into your editor. Then I would apply twixtor or an open-source equivalent to raise the frame rate. How well those work depends somewhat on the amount of motion. 7 fps to 30 fps ...


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