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Add an adjustment layer on top (right-click in empty area of the layer names. Go to New menu) Apply the effect to that.


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You'll need to make a separate layer for each county. You can do this by duplicating the entire NJ layer and deleting all but county #1, then duplicating the NJ layer and deleting all but county #2 and so on… You probably want to select all these layers and set their parent to the first layer so that if you transform one (move, scale, rotate) they'll all ...


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And because there's always two ways of doing anything in After Effects: precompose the layer to which you want to apply the effect. In the pre-compose dialogue choose "leave all attributes…". Resize the new composition to the size you need. Then in the original composition apply the effect to the pre-comp.


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I agree with McFlySoHigh. If you have multiple adjustment layers placed one above the other, the effects will be applied from Top to Bottom. A bit more on the order of effects application in Premiere Pro: First, it applies effects from Master Clip, Then go the effects applied to the clip in a regular way: to the Effect Controls panel (Top to Bottom) Then, ...


1

I'm fairly certain that Premiere Pro renders all layers from bottom to top. I have found several sources that confirm this behaviour for After Effects, but nowhere is it stated explicitly for Premiere Pro. From the Adobe documentation for After Effects: A composition consists of layers stacked on top of one another in the Timeline panel. When the ...


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