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I'm taking a video next month which will be in a dark conference room with a well lit stage. I need to set up a camera to video the presenter, but this year we have many more attendees, more tables, etc — so the camera will be 100 ft away from the podium (last year we got decent results from 40 ft away). It's a JVC GY-HM180U camera.

Any suggestions / recommendations on how to get the best possible image quality?

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    Parameters have changed. We'll now be 30-40ft away from the stage, but we have to be at the side of the hall (no space anywhere else). So the distance is less, but the shooting angle is about 45 degrees :( – PeteCon Sep 13 at 5:36
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People need to define the priorities, if the video footage is important to assign a good place to the camera. A television studio with a live audience is a good example of the priority.

Of course, this is not the case, but I am pretty sure these days is not the opposite to that. It has some importance to be streamed, "Youtoubed" or something. So, talk to the organizers and define a good place.

On the case, you really, really can not be closed or in a better spot, Define if the lens is long enough for the case. Define if the camera shake at that distance, moving the camera to follow the presenter is good enough, define if that shake can be compensated filming on 4K and cropping to stabilize.

  • Forgot to mention (sorry!) - We won't be recording (apart from stuff for B-Roll use in the future). The camera is used as a live feed to two side projection screens during the talk. Good stuff in your answer, though. Thanks! – PeteCon Sep 13 at 5:35
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    Oh, so the video is actually more important! First row then! – Rafael Sep 13 at 8:18
  • Be aware that some presenters lecture to the audience and some lecture to the screen. It's about 50/50 in my experience, and I've done quite a number of these. If you draw a line from the speaker to the main screen, and another line from the speaker to the audience center, make sure your camera is between the two lines, unless you can get two cameras, then have one on each line. – Jason Conrad Sep 16 at 20:58

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