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I'm a beginner with Premiere CC and following a tutorial that strongly recommends creating sequence settings to match one's clip settings. This seems reasonable enough, but I can't find any suitable presets to match my clip settings. I was not the one who shot the footage, so I don't know what type of camera was used.

ARRI is the default, it seems - should I use that? Oh wait, the footage I have is in 1280x720 resolution, but the only presets available for ARRI are in 1920x1080. Do I need to start looking for ways to upscale the video to match the sequence preset? Should I create a new preset that matches my clip settings (if that is possible)?

I should note that my final video must be 1920x1080. I can decide the frame rate, but I prefer 30fps over 29.97 because it will be easier to create animated content for if that needs to be added.

I don't yet understand enough about Premiere to know whether having a sequence with different dimensions or FPS than the project is a problem, or whether Premiere just handles the conversions automatically - just to give you an idea of where my knowledge level is at.

Clip properties:

  • Dimensions 1280 x 720
  • Frame rate 29.97
  • Source audio 48000 Hz
  • Project audio 48000 Hz - 32bit
  • Pixel aspect ratio 1.0

Thanks in advance for any help getting unstuck here.

  • Is your source clip progressive or interlaced? Did you shoot with an Arri camera or something else? – Michael Liebman Apr 11 '17 at 14:05
  • @MichaelLiebman As mentioned, I don't know what kind of camera was used, as I didn't shoot it myself. I also don't know if it's progressive or interlaced, although I haven't noticed any interlace lines. All I know for sure is what's in the metadata (listed above), and herein lies the challenge. – Mentalist Apr 11 '17 at 14:20
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    Sorry about asking about the source, I was skimming. The metadata should show if it is interlaced or progressive. You might not notice any interlacing artifacts even if it is. I'm not sure what you are using to view the metadata, but if you can't find interlaced vs. progressive, try MediaInfo. – Michael Liebman Apr 11 '17 at 17:25
  • @MichaelLiebman Thank you for that! MediaInfo will surely prove useful. – Mentalist Apr 12 '17 at 2:25
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Those are just presets. Just select one. When you drag a clip into the timeline, Adobe will recognize the clip has different settings that don't match. Just select the option to automatically change the settings for you.

Edit: And you can't magically change smaller resolutions to higher resolutions without suffering some pixelation. Is there a reason you have to upscale to 1080? Devices nowadays automatically adjust to different resolutions. No need to mess with upscaling. Just follow my steps above.

  • Thanks. The reason for upscaling would be to match the other clips that will be added that will be rendered in 1920x1080, so the lossiness can't be helped in this case. It's just for an animatic, nothing final, so it's okay. If anyone else has the same questions as me, I found a good tutorial on choosing sequence settings as well as a good tutorial on Adobe Media Encoder, which is apparently the ideal way to convert between formats. – Mentalist Apr 12 '17 at 2:19
  • Will the different clips be in the same timeline or is this for archival? – LetTheWritersWrite Apr 12 '17 at 2:29
  • They will be in the same timeline. – Mentalist Apr 12 '17 at 2:32
  • Then make sure to match the settings to the bigger resolution and scale up your smaller clips under effects->motion – LetTheWritersWrite Apr 12 '17 at 2:38

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