1

I need help with learning how to shoot videos for real estate. My first problem is that I am not strong enough to manage the camera without it shaking or picking up my walking movements. I purchased the Glidecam Smooth shooter and I still can't get videos that are smooth. (ok, so I am a weakling). So that's my first problem... the 2nd is that I need to know from everyone else their suggestions for the best camera for the job. I am currently using Canon 5d Mark II. One of the biggest problems is that when I pass a window the exposure goes crazy and the focus gets blurry.

I know I'm asking a lot here, but ugh, help...

3
  • A tripod with wheels might help if you're rolling on on smooth, flat surfaces. If you already have a tripod, buy some wheels for it. – Manly Nov 16 '16 at 19:25
  • 2
    Getting a shoulder rig or some type three point contact with your body makes the movement smoother, other options are the tripod one wheels as prev advised. 2nd part of the question DONT use auto for exposure or focus, do it all manually, if your exposing for indoors as soon as an outside source (window, open door, etc) it will blow out the exposure as it is much brighter, simple fix is to avoid these so planning your shots is a big must here. Otherwise just live with the bright parts as unless you start using skrims or blackouts outside the building you are going to run into these issues. – Adam Mann Pro Nov 17 '16 at 10:38
  • 1
    Wheels are only as smooth as the floor. It's actually quite difficult to get a rolling camera mount really steady, hence the way dollies go on tracks. Keep the lens as wide as you can, a long lens increases camera shake. Most real estate photography uses crazy wide lenses anyway, so this shouldn't be a problem - borrow one of the super wide lenses of the stills camera person and see how that looks. – stib Nov 17 '16 at 11:45
3

I never tried this myself, but I believe attaching a camera firmly to a tripod with wheels or putting the Glidecam Smooth Shooter onto a car or something sturdy with wheels might work for you.

1

Getting a shoulder rig or some type three point contact with your body makes the movement smoother, other options are the tripod one wheels as prev advised. 2nd part of the question DONT use auto for exposure or focus, do it all manually, if your exposing for indoors as soon as an outside source (window, open door, etc) it will blow out the exposure as it is much brighter, simple fix is to avoid these so planning your shots is a big must here. Otherwise just live with the bright parts as unless you start using skrims or blackouts outside the building you are going to run into these issues.

0

I use a dji ronin mx easy to use and setup supports most dslrs i used it to run along side bikes and cars and the image stays steady. Can buy for around £1300 or about £200 to hire for a day. Great for getting smooth shots can also have a second operator to operate the gimbal and controlled from an app. heres an example of what i shot on it

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.