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In order to produce a new logo revealing animation I was just searching the web for useful reference pages dealing with advanced camera movements. By "Camera movements" I don't mean the basic tilting, panning & dolly stuff.

I am actually searching for advanced camera movements, for example in this video (sec 58) when the mic comes up.

Does anyone know some resource pages with good explanations and maybe examples of advanced camera movements with regard to create specific emotional impact?

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    Zolly (dolly zoom) is pretty good for any emotional impact. Don't over use it though. – tommyip Mar 5 '16 at 8:19
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Mic shot looks like a dolly back tilt to track the subject. This is a compound movement that is natural to do with a hand held camera but more challenging when using a digital camera. Try tracking your camera to a null object in the scene roughly in the same place as the subject, but you can then move the null away from the subject to get better balanced framing.

Try using a handheld real world camera, like a phone, to rehearse shots around a substitute object like a glass or cup. Just fly around but try to stick to a fixed duration, a slow shot might last 6 seconds and a quick move might be 2 seconds. This will give you an idea how long a move takes while still being comfortable to watch later.

They used to do this revisualisation in the movies all the time, before CG came along.

  • very helpful and interesting answer, thank you for that! – Marten Zander Oct 20 '16 at 23:09
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The effect you see in sec 58 with the microphone, well the part that gives you the emotional reaction, is called Perspective Control. It is not limited to animated material, you can in fact obtain it in live filming by using a tilt lens. You can read more about the science of this effect in Wikipedia. For ideas on using it in After Effects I suggest going over the various forums, they offer plenty of discussions and collective experience to learn from.

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