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Jul 10 '14 at 22:17 comment added timonsku Sure, what I was aiming for is that he should look for washed out colors and color noise, thats something you can determine under a lot of circumstance as long as you have a well lit room that is lit by light source that can be called somewhat white :) I guess the term color accuracy was to broad in that case. We are talking about a relative difference, so the overall quality/accuracy does not matter when choosing a device over the other. That would be important when you need to decide if you want to use something at all.
Jul 10 '14 at 21:57 comment added Jason Conrad "What matters is that there is enough light, the type of light is not that important. They amount of megapixels matters but only to a degree, the "quality" of the pixels matters aswell e.g. noise and color accuracy." You cannot have accurate color, or anything that approaches it without a decent quality light source. It doesn't matter if I'm filming on a red epic or a smartphone, if the only light in the room is red, everything's going to look red. Period.
Jul 10 '14 at 18:53 comment added timonsku We are talking smartphone video here @JasonConrad, you won't get good color accuracy with any light setting. It's just to see which one is better and the quality on those tiny cameras is completely dependent on a good amount of light.
Jul 10 '14 at 13:43 comment added dking Yeah thats right and so i have decided to shoot complete video in daylight. hope that will help me. And currently i am working on audio issues.
Jul 9 '14 at 15:31 comment added Jason Conrad The type of light does matter. Sunlight is full spectrum. If you're going to use indoor lighting, you want your lights to have a high CRI (color rendition index). Essentially sunlight is %100 CRI and good indoor lights are around %95. Typical fluorescents can range anywhere from %65-%85. In order to have good color accuracy, you need good lights. Often, it's easier and cheaper to use sunlight.
Jul 9 '14 at 15:03 comment added timonsku What matters is that there is enough light, the type of light is not that important. They amount of megapixels matters but only to a degree, the "quality" of the pixels matters aswell e.g. noise and color accuracy.
Jul 9 '14 at 14:58 comment added dking Ok i will try. but since both devices have cameras with different megapixels will that matter?. will it be better in day light? or artificial light? (i mean will it really matter?)
Jul 9 '14 at 14:43 history edited timonsku CC BY-SA 3.0
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Jul 9 '14 at 14:43 comment added timonsku Just try it out. Make a video of the same scene with both devices and see which device makes the video with the least noise/best sharpness/color etc. and make sure not to use any of those software camera filters to boost color or anything, get a "raw" video of both cameras.
Jul 9 '14 at 14:28 comment added dking Yeah i have iphone 4s and it has pretty decent camera. Before few days i tried photographing few pictures with my brothers galaxy grand 2 and they were really very good pictures. But i am not sure about video quality. so which option will be a better using ipad or some camera mobile. I just have iphone 4s with me.
Jul 9 '14 at 14:24 comment added AJ Henderson +1 for the details about cameras in the various generations of iPad. I knew it had an improved but wasn't sure when it had.
Jul 9 '14 at 14:22 history answered timonsku CC BY-SA 3.0