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seen Mar 2 at 15:06

Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Oct
10
revised Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
oh right this is about pure digital synthesis, so yes this is totally valid
Oct
10
revised Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
oh right this is about pure digital synthesis, so yes this is totally valid
Sep
15
comment Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
Yes, but Nyquist-Shannon uses brickwall filters, which are physically impossible.
Sep
15
comment Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
Has it been shown that ultrasound still has an effect on our stereo perception even though we can't consciously hear it?
Sep
15
revised Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
elaboration
Sep
15
comment Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
"Now if the recording was made using 96KHz, you can noise shape most of the dithering signal to frequencies higher than 24KHz, so nobody will hear them. The dithering noise is at the end of the recording finally filtered out, at the moment you downsample your project back to 44.1 KHz." I don't think that's right, either. If you filter out all of the dither, then your output doesn't have dither anymore? It will go back to having quantization distortion?
Sep
15
comment Are there any mathematical advantages for higher sampling rates?
"since they can sometimes just be programmed to never generate a signal above half the sampling rate" Definitely true, however: "or they can filter everything out using a linear-phase brickwall filter that has no effect on the rest" I'm not sure that's possible. In order to filter out ultrasound from a digitally-generated wave, you would need to generate it at a higher sampling frequency in the first place (which would still alias, but not as much in the audible band). You cannot filter frequencies that are already aliased.
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15
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Dec
16
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
The frequency is maintained within a few parts per million, and the correction is 0.02 Hz (0.033%): en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
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15
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Dec
15
answered Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
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