146 reputation
819
bio website about.me/burgaard
location Farmville, VA
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Dec 31 '11 at 6:42

I love my work, but I have found both music and photography to be uniquely rewarding creative outlets. They resonate strongly with me because I can enjoy what I am doing right now, while simultaneously being able to appreciate the masters and top artists in each field with a deepening understanding of the craft and the artistic control.

The end goal is not to become like my artistic heroes and inspirations. It's the road traveled as I constantly examine and try to improve what I do that matters.


Jan
9
awarded  Revival
Jan
5
awarded  Enthusiast
Dec
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
16
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
Oh, and that's exactly what the links you provided talk about. So unless I happen to know what the drift was at any given time at the remote recording location, I'm really no better off, yeah?
Dec
16
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
I like your suggestion. For once, the dreaded hum might actually turn out to be helpful, if only a little. On the other hand, I know that the frequency of alternating current from your local power plant is also prone to drifting. AFAIK, it is pretty common for power plants to only guarantee the number of oscillations over, say, 24 hours. So if they're falling behind or overshooting at the end of a 24 period they will simply increase or decrease the frequency to meet the guaranteed number.
Dec
16
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
I actually don't know what kind of audio interface or software the guitarist used, but I believe it was fairly basic.
Dec
15
awarded  Critic
Dec
15
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
your response and comment makes sense to me, yet this is what I saw. Stretching the guitarists samples upon import fixed minuscule key and tempo drift issues.
Dec
15
awarded  Beta
Dec
14
revised Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
Added calculation of sample drift for a two minute sample
Dec
14
comment Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
I just added an example calculation above. I guess one of the things that make audio fidelity hard, is that our ears are very finely tuned to detect differences. Even though a lot of us don't have absolute hearing in terms of detecting notes, most people can tell when to sounds are just a few milliseconds apart. So even with your example of one device sampling at 44,099Hz and another at 44,102Hz, the relative difference is about .0068%. For a five minute recording that means the length of the files will be about 20 ms apart and, depending on the sound material, beginning to become audible.
Dec
14
revised Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
added 915 characters in body
Dec
13
asked Is there an easy method for detecting or marking the actual sample frequency?
Dec
10
awarded  Commentator
Dec
8
comment What's the difference between an Engineer and a Producer?
I believe THE Bruce Dickinson would put it this way: More cowbell!
Dec
8
awarded  Scholar
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awarded  Editor
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awarded  Student
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awarded  Supporter
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awarded  Teacher