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1

Processing can do it, if you're not afraid of Java. There's a demonstration processing sketch that comes included with the application that does a frequency spectrum bar graph. It's relatively easy to save the output of a processing sketch to a video file. And it's free.


0

You have two main options I can see, first one is to take a look at Open Broadcaster Software Project. This project is free and open source and is targeted at individuals trying to stream primarily, but it does have good support for both a video capture device and a screen capture. I believe it is possible to configure a shortcut key for swapping sources ...


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Not that I know of (does not mean its not out there), this would be very easy to do in Post production and since you have to pull the video of the camera card to upload it anyway just drop it in in post and keep the camera audio playing over it.


-1

On youtube? It depends. Youtube recompresses video uploads to reduce space and store a version of the video which requires the least CPU to decompress. I've uploaded 1080p videos which later look horrible in the youtube version. And the same happens with 4k video. Having said that, it is very unlikely youtube will increase the quality of the video streams, ...


1

I asked on the ffmpeg-users mailing list, and it was suggested that I add -brand 3gp6 to my encoding command. This achieved the result in mediainfo that I was looking for. However, it remains to be seen whether this really reaches the same compatibility with older hardware that YouTube's 3GP files have. I don't have any old hardware to test with, lol. ...


2

No, there is no difference to the human eye (or exceptionally minimal). Your monitor can't display higher quality than it is capable of displaying. The only advantage you would have is if you were to zoom in on part of the image, you would have more detail when you zoomed in. Additionally, as user1118321 pointed out, since 4k is not an even multiple of ...


2

There's not a lot of point to it. You're using more network bandwidth to download it, and your computer is working harder to display it, but no, you get no additional visible quality from it. In fact, it's likely that you'll get lower quality because the computer has to downsample it before it can display it.



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