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12

Some general info about the formats used: YouTube uses 4 container formats and 3 diffrent codecs. It depends on the popularity of the video what codecs are used for your video (see below why). Generally, every of your uploaded video will be encoded in h.264 and will be muxed into an .flv and .mp4 container. Thats the standard and this will hapen for every ...


6

There's actually a big difference between the two. If you're on a budget and don't mind that editing video is not as straight forward, then Motion is actually not a bad route to take. Final Cut allows you to use things you've created in Motion as graphical templates. Motion in and of itself is a 2D(/3D) animation app, it wasn't made for video editing. ...


5

Very broadly speaking, you have a much easier experience obtaining permission if you are not making money from someone else's content. Most copyright laws recognise 'fair use' -- a small quote or a clip that is proof of someone else having said something. It is customary and advisable to put such clip in a box or window to show that the content is being ...


4

I worked out a satisfactory solution to this problem. It involves adding the 'Computer RGB to Studio RGB' Video FX to each video track in your Vegas Studio project. This effects the rendered file and project quite a lot but appears normal when uploaded to Youtube: Quicktime Youtube It's possible to disable the track Video FX whilst you work on your ...


4

Personally I always choose MP4 container and the H.264 codec as this is also the codec YouTube uses in the final video stream. What key-frame rates and compression you need really depends on the footage and it's unfortunately close to impossible to give as a generic answer for this reason. If you have a lot of movements you will need key-frames more often ...


4

It's referred to as a jump cut. I would guess that perhaps the Apple ads that used it might have made it popular again, but that's just a guess. The idea behind it is to visually show a change in direction of thought since typically it matches up with the start of another phrase. It jumps the viewer forward in time and makes them aware of a subtle change ...


3

In nearly all countries, copyright protects creative works automatically. Some exceptions and restrictions apply, but unless the author has voluntarily added his work to the public domain or the copyright has expired (common terms are seventy and ninety years after publication or after death of the author), it's safe to assume all songs are copyrighted, ...


3

A coworker has just turned me on to using Warp Stabilizer. It's a built-in effect in Adobe Premiere CS6. Before using this tool, I also used After Effects to smooth and stabilize motion. The difference is outstanding. Warp Stabilizer has worked faster, within my workflow, and more reliable than After Effects stabilization has. This has been huge for me. ...


3

What format YT output their video depends on various factors. For most ordinary videos they use H264 encoded streams for video (AAC or MP3 for audio) in form of MP4 and FLV container files. These are just containers holding the encoded video data - although the H264-encoded format is no guarantee with FLV-files (or in theory with MP4 files) as they can also ...


2

The reason you are losing contrast is because of the codec you are using to export to. YouTube (as well as Vimeo, and practically every other video website nowadays) works using the H.264 codec. Here are YouTube's instructions for how they'd like videos to be encoded for upload. The TL;DR version of that page: Container: .mp4 Audio Codec: AAC-LC ...


2

While watching the examples it struck me that your video is stuttering as it is over the top with MBPS (23 MB per sec). So I would address your compression scheme first. I recommend that you consider rending your work in mp4 with 5 MB to 10 MB per sec. Here is the recommended video and audio compression as set by the folks at Vimeo for optimizing ...


2

When uploading to YouTube: no (for now...) Your audio needs to be premixed into one stereo (or mono) channel. When using YouTube's online video editor: yes, but you are limited to voice-over and music tracks For more info: http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=183851 (see point 4. adding audio)


2

Amazingly, the best place to start with a question like this is Youtube. Believe it or not they have help file that explain the process with quite a bit of detail: https://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=1722171&topic=2888648&ctx=topic On Youtube itself many others have offered up video tutorials on how to do it: ...


2

What you need is no different from what you need for any video production effort. You need a decent camera and camera work, which likely involves a decent tripod, decent lighting, decent scripting, decent acting, decent editing and decent compression. The camera and camera work ensure that the video is clear and that it isn't distractingly shaky and that ...


2

The royalty free music is still copy-written. You have purchased a right to use it without paying royalties, but YouTube doesn't know that you have those rights. You need to provide the necessary documentation to YouTube that you have the right to use it there (license statement from your purchase) and they should re-activate it for you. They do this to ...


2

"Royalty free" is funny that way, because the content is actually copyrighted - but you're given permission to use it. If you have your source, and can point to a licence that states 'royalty free' you should be able to get Youtube to reactivate your video. You'd probably need to give credits where credit's due in your about text.


2

you can use something like a M/E switcher with a multiviewer to do this. Just feed the program out into the computer you are streaming from using an input card. I have not used youtube streaming, but I know that justin.tv or other streaming services can use something like OBS to switch between scenes which you can setup with different video inputs in ...


1

It depends entirely on the policies of the game manufacturer and what they tell Youtube to do. Some game makers claim copyright over any content produced using their game. Some do not allow any video to be posted, some allow only videos from certain networks, some allow videos from anyone as long as they aren't monetized and some allow anyone to post ...


1

I'm going to repost a section of my answer from this question, as it seems generally relevant: YouTube (as well as Vimeo, and practically every other video website nowadays) works using the H.264 codec. Here are YouTube's instructions for how they'd like videos to be encoded for upload. The TL;DR version of that page: Container: ...


1

This is just a result of the compression that Youtube chooses to apply. Your initial data rate for the video (3.5 megabits for an SD video) is exceptionally high and not really designed for streaming. Youtube probably sees that it is only an SD stream and then drops the bit-rate accordingly. It may not be possible to get better quality since Youtube's ...


1

For best results on any Youtube upload it is always best to follow the recommended video encoding settings. Listed here: https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/1722171?hl=en If you have followed those settings exactly and you are still having a problem it is a localized problem that will not affect everyone. Youtube videos do not play the exact same ...


1

There are presets for Youtube specifically already in Adobe Media Encoder. I would suggest using one of them. You can also find the technical recommendations from Youtube on how to encode the videos here, however I believe the presets already conform to these recommendations.


1

MotionBend, http://www.motionbend.com, might be what you are looking for, http://www.fcp.co/final-cut-pro/news/1119-motionbend-takes-video-stabilisation-to-the-next-level-and-adds-fcpx-xml-export. Do you have any examples of videos you are trying to stabilize ?


1

Based on the link you added in your comment, I would say you could use After Effects, and Premiere for this very easily...there may be easier/cheaper solutions but essentially what you are going for is pretty easy to make Graphic designing aside you could probably learn and do this in a day or two, if you have any sort of background in photoshop or ...


1

It honestly looks like something got corrupted with your export. Have you tried encoding it more than once? 12 megabits per second with a 24mpbs peak should be more than sufficient for high quality 1080p video. If anything, it may be excessive. The quality you are getting looks more like what I'd expect at sub-1 mbps video for this quality level. As an ...


1

Is there a tool that will do it, probably... is there a tool that will do it well and make it anything worth watching? No. Making a quality slideshow set to music requires manual timing and ordering and a fair bit of effort on the editor's part. It isn't something you can simply automate away. If you don't put in the effort to make something good, it ...


1

I'd be careful how one uses the term 'jump cut'. Historically a jump cut meant a serious violation of continuity such as a cowboy holding a gun in his left hand and then in the next shot he is holding it in his right hand with no possible reason for the sudden change. Another example is when action might be moving from left to right and suddenly in the next ...


1

Just to clarify, the "Standard YouTube license" found in YouTube's ToS basically grants YouTube the permission to serve the video to anyone who asks to see it on YouTube.com or through an approved portal like an embedded player or mobile app (you may restrict the work's playback in certain markets, or prevent certain non-core uses, such as embedding, ...


1

YouTube will re-encode whatever you give it, and depending on the ratecontrol method YouTube uses, the complexity of the input can be a major factor in the file size of the videos YouTube re-encodes. Therefore, without altering your content, you may have little control of the size of the videos on YouTube's servers. There is little need to adhere to ...


1

The YouTube video editor is just not designed for this sort of thing - it has very basic functionality, just enough to allow you to tweak a couple of things. Once the edit is complete it has no ongoing concept of a 'project' - you just have a new video. I would always recommend editing locally in a proper video editor and then uploading.



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