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5

Version control in the sense of Git isn't very practical in the video world. You would need to make a specific version control tool for every audio and video tool out there as all work with their own project formats. But being able to read these formats is just one thing, then you also need the render engine of that tool to show diff's. Though all of these ...


4

Speech Detection You havent mentioned what NLE you use to edit, however here is a method you can use to transcribe if you are using Adobe CS4 or later. This method uses speech detection to automatically transcribe videos - a feature brought in with CS4. It then adds the the text into the metadata of the file. Analyze speech to create text metadata ...


4

Just to add to the previous responses: While there's nothing quite like Git for the video world, there are Digital Asset Management/Media Asset Management tools that can more or less do the same thing - version control and permission/user management (they also do a lot more, as they're really built as libraries for your media). For years, I used Apple's ...


3

If you enable it in the preferences After Effects and Premiere automatically make incremental saves of the project files. These incremental saves could be used to revert to previous versions, which is like a very basic implementation of version control (you might want to increase the number of versions from 5 though). FCP has a "restore from previous ...


3

FCPX has currently no way to link Motion Projects to FCPX Projects. To place Motion Projects in another directory than the default one, you have to create symbolic links using Terminal (see below). Motion Projects can only be used in FCPX as Templates. From Apple's PDF "Managing Media with Final Cut Pro X Libraries": Motion templates are not managed as ...


2

I've never heard the terms On-line and Off-line editing used for audio. In the video world, off-line editing is a term used for the editing process, whereby you edit your footage (often compressed) and then export and EDl for the On-line editor to do the final assembly with higher quality picture, maybe adding titles and some transitions and color ...


2

I'm in a very similar situation to yours. I'm a software architect that also does a professional level of A/V work on the side as a professional hobby. The time commitment can be difficult at times, but I have always found that putting aside blocks of time is the best way to make solid progress. I find that if I try to do it small bits at a time, it tends ...


2

I have seen some trainwrecks by combining Nikon .mov with Vegas Pro 10. After tech calls into both Nikon and Sony it was determined that my machine didn't have enough resources. I need to upgrade from 32 bit to a 64 bit version of Win7, plus I need to go from a quad core to an i7, and from 4GB to 12 GB or better. I can use my Nikon files now but only if I ...


2

Version control doesn't really have as much of a place in video editing because it is by nature non-destructive. At the core of any NLE(non-linear video editor), the output is actually something known as an Editing Decision List or EDL. This is extremely analogous to the history in Lightroom as that history is a record of all changes that have been applied ...


2

Likely your issues were stemming from trying to edit with H264 files. This is something that FCP hates! Convert all your h264 footage to ProRes before you start editing (using Compressor, MPEG Streamclip, or the awesome Magic Bullet Grinder) and then edit with the ProRes files. Output your final 'Master File' as ProRes and then use Compressor to encode ...


2

I would use ffmpeg. Just write a sript in any scripting language you prefer and tell ffmpeg to encode new files depending on the total duration of the source file and let it only encode a certain amount of time. You can completely automate this sort of workflow with ffmpeg.


1

I assume you record video game footage? Recording and rendering on one machine is something I wouldn't recommend with a regular PC if you play modern games that take a lot of your CPU and GPU resources. I usually recommend getting an SSD but in this case it seems you are heavily CPU limited. You could theoretically encode on the GPU but I'm not sure if that ...


1

Your workflow is a little off from how it is designed by Adobe. Step 1: Adobe Story: You build your script and can break it into shots that you need to capture before you even start shooting. This can then work as the blueprint to plan out shooting of the project. Step 2: Adobe Prelude: I believe you can preconfigure a shot list that needs to be captured ...


1

OK, I'll have a go. Here's my own answer (and advise I should take for myself - which I actually did do to some extent): Avoid procrastination. Start small. Start with doing something. Don't hold up too high expectations to put yourself off. Good ideas here: http://zenhabits.net/dead-simple-guide-to-beating-procrastination/ (I succeed a bit with this ...


1

It depends on the quality you want to achieve and where your skill set is. The bigger difference between 2d and 3d animation isn't so much the time it consumes, but rather the skill set it requires. The techniques for both are completely different (though there is a subset of 2d animation that is based on cell-shading or other specialized rendering of 3d ...


1

Well, no need to worry about. Transcribing footage is something very easy now-these-days. What you have to make sure is that just write down all your audio in chronological order and he time codes of when each section begins and ends. Try to include punctuation and how phrases are expressed, so your are as close to the video as possible. If you are seriously ...


1

Quite an expensive solution: Sony Vegas Pro + Transcoder plugin can do it :)


1

You can achieve all your goals using ffmpeg and sox, these are command line tools for video and audio processing respectively. I can not provide you with a ready to roll solution, but here are examples for a pre-roll video, audio noise reduction, text overlay and conversion from AVCHD.


1

You are going along the right track, but the first step is not necessary. You want to use the "automate to sequence" functionality, found under the Project menu, to set the images to the markers. There are a variety of orders that you can have it insert the images in and you may need to do some adjustments to how you bring in the images to make them go in ...


1

Another option worth exploring would be to use Cineform Studio (http://gopro.com/software-app/cineform-studio) from GoPro. It allows you to mark clips within a larger movie file, and to individually export the clips as separate .mov files, which can then be imported into your favourite editor. While Cineform Studio is developed by GoPro, I've found that it ...


1

Why are you not simply using the video editing package to scrub for clips? My preference has always been to do things in the editing software directly. I'm a Premiere guy not a FCPX guy, but is there any method to form a virtual clip based on given start and end points in FCPX? How powerful is your system if it is crashing trying to scrub H264 files? It ...


1

Not on FCPX, but on Avid. However, this is what I do and it may help: Download at the maximum possible resolution you can download at. Use AVIDemux as my rough-cut tool to mark 'A' and 'B' and save as clips with meaningful names. Leave a few seconds on either side. Import clips into Avid Sometimes, I have to convert the container to 'MP4' or resample ...


1

This is an interesting question and I think maybe you are coming from a different situation than I am, I worked as a professional editor / VFX Artist and before that assistant editor for many years before graduating to directing and I think the easy bottom line answer is, if you love it, you wont be able to get enough. However there are those days your like ...



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