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If you have firwire device but no firewire port you need an adapter. Apple offers one: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD464ZM/A/apple-thunderbolt-to-firewire-adapter If you tape deck is offering an output that the Canopus supports you will be able to capture your tapes that way. Alternatively you might want to look for a USB based solution that might be ...


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You're going to need to do a little experimentation to find out what works best for you, but here are a few things to consider: First, the minimum amount of light you need depends on the performance of your camera and lens. Stanley Kubrick shot parts of Barry Lyndon in candle light, but he used a f0.7 Zeiss prime which was built for NASA and customized to ...


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I've never heard that term used for rendering before, but it is most likely referring to the number of hours of computation needed for a single CPU or GPU to process it. In most video and 3d applications, it is possible to parallelize the rendering of the video itself (though not necessarily the encoding. Thus, a job that would take 200 "man hours" (more ...


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I have found CasparCG. It looks pretty solid. I've been running it this evening to see how it flows and its pretty good. If I had another person to just manage it, it would be perfect but for now, I'll just do it myself and use it as a pre and post show video playback device.


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It might also be that your project is set at 16-bit, but your photography is in 8-bit. You can change the bit in project settings or at the bottom of the Project folder to the left of the UI.


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With low light levels your brightest signal will be close to the noise floor, so you only really have three options: a camera with better low light performance (although this can only take you so far) More expensive sensors can give a lower noise floor, allowing you to resolve more detail a faster lens As Jason commented: If the widest aperture ...


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I agree with your assessment that 4K isn't ready (or affordable) yet. Consider what you want to shoot, and what you're willing to carry around to do so. Then find a 1080P camera within your budget. As already stated, the total resolution isn't as important as the sensor size/quality, lens quality, in-camera compression (the less the better), and ...


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Just to add a little bit more info to SlimSCSI's straight up answer. Does youtube store different video files for different bit rate? Yes and no, for the 1080p stream YouTube utilizes a technique called DASH. This serves essentially a video that was encoded with several different bitrates (though its one file) and adapts the bitrate on the fly ...


2

You will pay substantially more for a good 4k camera right now than you would for a good 1080p camera. Quality =/= resolution, there are phones that can shoot in 4k but the videos will look a lot worse than a 1080p video from a dedicated 1080p camcorder/dslr, the image quality depends on a lot of factors. A bigger sensor for example has the ability to ...


1

Does youtube store different video files for different bit rate? Yes is the technique called "resampling" ? No Does youtube make live resampling for every user ? No All this things happens live ? No, not on youtube. But Yes on twitch.tv Or it encode and save different video files for different bitrate, so that when a user ...


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Thunderf00t created that video in the following way; he wrote a script and then recorded his voice separately as a audio file After that, he probably edited that audio file to get rid of any mistakes, and mastered it to make it sound nice. He then imported that audio file to a video editor In the video editor he added 3rd party images and video to fit his ...


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Thats not how you do it, you record a text and time your video cuts based on your voice over. Unless you stream live you dont do live editing while you do a voice over, its very impractical and makes your live a lot harder as you will not record a 5+ minute text in a single take and you will have to do everything over and over again instead of editing your ...


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There might be a technical limitation: The CCD sensor. If the CCD is not square, a mechanism needs to be created so that it is always stabilized to the ground level (something more elaborated but like the naval compasses that keep their horizontal level no matter the sea waves). If it is not the CCD, then there should be a window that makes the 16:9 or ...


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While I mostly agree with what Professor Sparkles says above, note that Google is attempting to convince people not to film vertical video. In this YouTube video they show the new overlay that is displayed while filming vertically on Android phones, gently encouraging the user to turn their camera.


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There is indeed no technical limitation that would prevent us from preventing vertical videos in software. The issue is more of an UX/usability problem. While the sensor would allow us to capture virtually any part of it (video has usually always a lower resolution than the sensor can provide, when making videos the phone just records a small portion of the ...


1

The Wikipedia article on MPEG-4 is a great start as the MP4 file specification is part of the MPEG-4 spec. Specifically version 2 of MP4 is MPEG-4 Part 14. While not free, you can purchase copies of the ISO spec under ISO# 14496-14:2003. A preview with some detail is available from the ISO here. It is designed to contain any of the various MPEG video ...


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There's a variety of software available for live video manipulation, from the minimalistic, developer-oriented vvvv and pd, to the more aesthetically pleasing Max/MSP and Troikatronix Isadora. I've used each of these in some capacity, and personally I prefer Isadora, as it is more intuitive to use and get a basic patch up and running in a short time than ...


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I recommend VVVV also. You could make a patch that controls many video effects with levels from microphone input. Take a look at Video Effects and Compositing Tutorials Basic tutorials and examples on how to use TextureFX nodes to work with the same tricks and techniques you could previously achieve only in Photoshop or After Effects. And what's ...


1

Professional film makers generally use audio recorded separately from the video on dedicated recorders using professional mics (using XLR cables and the like). 3.5 mm audio connectors in particular are almost exclusively a consumer level connector. So for a professional level, the answer is use something like a Zoom h4n, h5 or h6 and microphones of your ...


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There are several programs available that allow you to do that. One very popular tool in the live visual industry is MAX (especially Max for Live). Its a visual programming language to create visuals for live performances that also integrates into a few tools like Ableton Live. A program that I personally use at work is called vvvv, its a visual programming ...


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Your issue is probably that you don't have enough USB bandwidth available, if your webcams support it switch to MJPEG instead of uncompressed frames. Usually any webcam supports MJPEG encoding to deliver frames to your PC. Here a similar question on SO http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9781770/capturing-multiple-webcams-uvcvideo-with-opencv-on-linux


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This is a "very" old question, but there is a pretty simple method to do this (and something that comes up surprisingly often). So if you landed here, I do hope you find this solution helpful. Change the individual slides to pdf. Turn the pdf to jpg Turn the jpg's into a film. To do this I have used unoconv, ghostscript, graphicsmagick and ffmpeg. ...


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After a bit of googling for 'paywall upstream' I came across this link. http://publisher.tinypass.com/guide/archives/tipstrick/any-ovp it might work for you This is a company that provides a paywall service for streaming


3

The original AppleTV could only playback at 1280x720 at 24fps. Because your video is at 25fps, it has to use a slightly lower resolution. If you either lower the frame rate (probably not an option) or exclude the original AppleTV, it should export at the higher resolution. I believe there's another setting than the "Most Compatible" one which excludes the ...


1

Practically you can't do this. The best you can probably do is make it more shaky and grainy. You could also drop the resolution to make it look like it had been digitally zoomed in. The reason you can't practically do it is because of perspective. When you shoot video from close up, the angle of view is much closer. A small difference in distance to ...


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This is a complicated question that doesn't have an exact answer. In general, yes, the quality will probably be lower but the higher frame rate is higher "quality" to begin with. With video, you have to remember that temporal information is part of the quality. If you double the frame rate, the quality of each individual frame will go down, but you will ...


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When you shoot from further away you use a "longer" lens, in other words a lens with a longer focal length. This has a few effects, that you'll have to fake to make it look real. First, the perspective tends to get flattened with long lenses. You've probably seen this in the classic cinema trope of a long shot of a crowd walking along a footpath, where ...


2

If the result of increasing the frame rate is that more pixels are displayed per second, then yes, keeping the bit rate the same will almost certainly mean a loss in overall quality. Not all such losses are objectionable or even necessarily noticeable. For example, if the bit rate is 30 Mb/s and you reduce it to 15 Mb/s, probably not many people would ...


2

You can do this with GStreamer and a plugin called rtpjitterbuffer. There is an example usage on the bottom of that page with the gst-launch tool to do a simple desktop playback of an rtp stream with network errors. gst-launch-1.0 rtspsrc location=rtsp://192.168.1.133:8554/mpeg1or2AudioVideoTest ! rtpjitterbuffer ! rtpmpvdepay ! mpeg2dec ! xvimagesink You ...



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