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Practically you can't do this. The best you can probably do is make it more shaky and grainy. You could also drop the resolution to make it look like it had been digitally zoomed in. The reason you can't practically do it is because of perspective. When you shoot video from close up, the angle of view is much closer. A small difference in distance to ...


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This is a complicated question that doesn't have an exact answer. In general, yes, the quality will probably be lower but the higher frame rate is higher "quality" to begin with. With video, you have to remember that temporal information is part of the quality. If you double the frame rate, the quality of each individual frame will go down, but you will ...


2

When you shoot from further away you use a "longer" lens, in other words a lens with a longer focal length. This has a few effects, that you'll have to fake to make it look real. First, the perspective tends to get flattened with long lenses. You've probably seen this in the classic cinema trope of a long shot of a crowd walking along a footpath, where ...


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If the result of increasing the frame rate is that more pixels are displayed per second, then yes, keeping the bit rate the same will almost certainly mean a loss in overall quality. Not all such losses are objectionable or even necessarily noticeable. For example, if the bit rate is 30 Mb/s and you reduce it to 15 Mb/s, probably not many people would ...


2

You can do this with GStreamer and a plugin called rtpjitterbuffer. There is an example usage on the bottom of that page with the gst-launch tool to do a simple desktop playback of an rtp stream with network errors. gst-launch-1.0 rtspsrc location=rtsp://192.168.1.133:8554/mpeg1or2AudioVideoTest ! rtpjitterbuffer ! rtpmpvdepay ! mpeg2dec ! xvimagesink You ...


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There isn't an "affordable" option here. Either you use high intensity light screens or high intensity rear projection with an enclosure around the back side to keep out sunlight. Either option is looking at tens of thousands of dollars per screen to buy. I'm not particularly familiar with light screens because they tend to be a lot harder to move than ...


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"Most affordable" makes this a very difficult question to answer. The way most festivals do it is by hiring large screens. You could try and do it with a projector, which can work okay at night, but not so good in daylight (like a drive-in cinema). For bright displays there aren't really any shortcuts - Have a good video platform and desk Route signal ...


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It depends on the level of protection you want, but no, there isn't really a good way to do it with Wordpress. You can paywall a portion of your Wordpress site, but a live stream isn't going to go over HTTP, it is going to run over an RTMP stream or something similar. Paywalling your Wordpress site will make people pay to find out the name of the RTMP ...


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WebM doesn't support subtitles nor chapters right now so you won't be able to embed them without creating a WebM file that is out of specs. You will probably want to remux your video into mkv and then convert your VTT subtitles to SRT and mux these into your mkv aswell. From http://www.webmproject.org/docs/container/ Initial WebM release does not ...


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So, the answer to your question is 'yes, but...' It's perfectly feasible, but you have to create an output module with the settings that you want, and then save it to your computer. You can create this by going to Edit -> Templates -> Output Module. Click on the 'New' button in the pop-up window, and then Edit it for the settings you need (quicktime, ...


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I don't know exactly what kind of animations you're looking for, but Adobe After Effects is very popular for animation. You can even get a free 30-day trial of the software. That being said, if you're not familiar with After Effects, there is quite a bit of a learning curve, but the good news is that there are a ton of online resources ...


3

Davinci Resolve lite is free, and it contains an excellent motion tracker. By combining the motion tracker with a power window, and adding a color correction (to darken everything outside of the power window), you should be able to achieve the results you're after very quickly. For tutorials on Davinci Resolve, search youtube for Alexis Van Hurkman. He ...


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I agree with the two previous answers: You'll need paid motion-tracking software such as After Effects. I wanted to add that in addition to tracking the X-Y position in the frame, you will most likely need to track the "rotation" of the 2 eyes as well. That is, a horizontal rectangular mask will work for the eyes of a person facing forward with his/her ...


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Sometimes videos straight out of After Effects can be slow, or "stutter-y". What I've found is that bringing the video into Premiere Pro and exporting it from Premiere (essentially re-rendering the video in Premiere) can help with this significantly.


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The Manfrotto is a 500 series, so it uses the Video Camera Plate. I'm not sure what you mean about adapting Benro products.


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You can try transcoding to a lower quality format that would be easier to play back. If the video itself is stuttering, then the lower quality will still stutter in the same way. If you are limited by your playback speed, then the lower quality version should play smoothly. If it plays smooth at lower quality, then you know that the original file is good. ...


2

Have you considered buying an entirely separate set of QR plates to unify your entire setup? For instance, in our setup, we use a tripod, a monopod, and a GlideCam with various attachments for each of these (rail systems, teleprompters, etc.). By adding this (relatively) cheap QR plate to the top of each stabilization method, we can switch our cameras around ...


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Personally, I use fraps. The only reason I use fraps is because I used to record desktop footage a ton. However, if you get the free version of fraps, it should allow you to see the framerate of the video playing back while the program is open.


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Unfortunately, this requires motion tracking and there isn't much out there that can handle it for free. (As Jason Conrad pointed out, DaVinci Resolve Lite can.) Motion tracking is pretty elaborate because it has to use complex computer vision systems to identify objects within the image and track where they move from frame to frame. After Effects is ...


2

I would go with either jing ( http://www.techsmith.com/jing.html ) free or Camtasia ( http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia.html ) both from Techsmith. Camtasia allow you to zoom in on part of the screen after recording but before rendering. This basically solves your problem and is great when you need to create video to a resolution that is less than the ...


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You can use Lightworks (multi-plattform) for that or alternatively iMovie. Both offer either masking and or cropping. One of the most basic features in a video editor. Just watch one of the dozens of beginner tutorials for the tool that fits you the most. When you go with the cropping approach you just duplicate the video layer and crop each layer down to ...


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One of the best resources you will find for this is probably the Matterhorn documentation itself. The Capture Agent Hardware page has samples of hardware that was used at a number of schools that have implemented capture agents for Matterhorn. It appears that the Epiphan VGA2USB is the near universal standard for VGA capture. There seems to be a wider ...


1

If all you're doing is trimming the video, you may want to consider the command line tool ffmpeg. The -ss flag will allow you to set the in point for your trim. You can also set an out point on with the -t flag. For example, the following command will take "name_of_movie.mp4", trim the first 10 seconds off, copy the audio and video codecs, and output the ...


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I don't know of anything that allows you to specify something like trimming a certain amount off in batch, but you can do all of the rest with Adobe Media Encoder. Open AME and drag all of the clips that you'd like to trim into the Queue panel. Select all of the files in the queue and click on one of the preset links: Choose a format and preset ...


0

You are using the same bitrate for each video. The bitrate determines how much data is used per second. The resolution has nothing to do with how much data is used, it only impacts the number of points of data which are encoded (and thus determines part of the quality of the video output for a given bitrate). What you end up with is a lower resolution ...


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That has to do with choosing a variable bitrate aswell as how h264 essentially works. Some videos can be compressed better than others. If in one video for example you have a lot of "still" frames with not much moving the scene, h264 can compress that a lot better than a video with a lot of action. H.264 is doing motion estimation and works in so called ...


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Probably better suited for Stackoverflow but I think its still a valid question for this SE. Producing theora(ogg) versions of your videos is actually redundant. Any browser version supporting ogg is also supporting webm. For questions like these I recommend using caniuse.com. If you compare webm with ogg you quickly see that you cover the same browser ...



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