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6

After Effects could certainly do what you want, as could Apple Motion (only for Macs though). If you're on a budget you might want to look at something lower cost - or free: Natron is an open source free compositor, that will be able to do that effect Blender - as well as being a 3D animation package it has a compositor too compositing is the technique ...


3

After Effects is a good, reasonably priced solution. If you're not on a tight schedule and on a tight budget, The Foundry is releasing a noncommercial version of their Nuke compositing platform, which is much more powerful than After Effects, sometime soon.


3

No you wont be faster, but you could use a different method. As in a different application. Really it comes down to what your bottleneck is. If the bottleneck is the interplay between you and the computer then sure. What you can do is expand the video to frames as a prepass. This takes time but is essentially unsupervised. Likewise you could preprocess the ...


3

Just about everything you'd like to know about LaserVision disks can be found in this Wikipedia page, including the details of how the composite analog video is stored in a series of pits and lands. Of course it's not strictly analog because it's sampled and later re-integrated, but there is no digitization of the video as we think of it today with Blu-Ray ...


3

There are three main reasons that still cameras with video functionality have restrictions on the length of video they will shoot. The first and most common, as tomh pointed out is tax purposes. The European Union charges a 5% tax on any video recording device and sets the limit at any device capable of recording 30 minutes or more of video. To avoid this ...


3

Generally, you want to mix color for ideal conditions, not the common situation. It is up to people to do the best they can to adjust their systems to support a vivid and clear image. If you mix to try to make it look the best on some "average", not only will it look bad on any good displays, but it will also look bad on any well adjusted average displays. ...


2

You need a relatively solid HDMI capture device to capture uncompressed HDMI output. I'm not aware of any HDMI capture devices that will work with a phone or tablet, but there are options you could use with a laptop, such as the Black Magic Intensity, however, at that point, you are really probably better off going with a purpose built device such as the ...


2

You can to a laptop using an adapter (Blackmagic make some). If you want something a bit more portable the Atmos Ninja (or similar) would be your best options.


2

No, such a thing does not exist. You can get some very rough guidelines in terms of things like suggested recording profiles for Youtube, Vimeo, or bitrates used by Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Instant Watch, but at the end of the day, the bitrate needed for a given resolution is entirely content dependent as well as dependent on how much time you can spend ...


2

In case of H.264 codec, you can use YouTube recommendations. Here's Vimeo video compression guidelines


2

here's another trick worth knowing that will do the job without any third party software. To quickly duplicate your layers: first set the label colour to something you haven't used in your comp. duplicate it, and then click on the label and choose Select Layer Group, duplicate the selected layers to create four layers. Repeat and you'll have eight, sixteen, ...


2

No, you couldn't do it faster than the software does it. The software, if it is any good at all, should be much faster than you could possibly do it. That's why people use the software. If the software runs slow, then the same steps would be needed in your manual process and the manual process (whatever that is supposed to mean) would also be just as ...


2

To expand on LordNeckbeard's answer, yes, just mux the JPEG data into an MJPEG video stream. That will be the smallest representation of the exact sequence of output images, even though MJPEG is a terribly inefficient codec by today's standards. (no temporal redundancy, and not even any intra prediction. You can make a variable-framerate MJPEG video to ...


2

This will output a lossless H.264 video where frames will use information from other frames ffmpeg -f image2 -r 30 -i %09d.jpg -vcodec libx264 -profile:v high444 -refs 16 -crf 0 -preset ultrafast a.mp4 Explanation of options: -f image2 - tells ffmpeg to select a group of images -r 30 - tells ffmpeg to encode at 30 frames (or images) per second (change ...


2

Sounds like thoses apps aren't respecting the Pixel Aspect Ratio (PAR) flag. Widescreen DVD movies aren't usually made of more pixels, they have a setting in the metadata telling the player to stretch the pixels from squares into rectangles to make the picture look right. VLC is reading the PAR flag and playing the pixels back in their correct aspect ...


2

When you're talking about manually extracting a matte, you really should be looking at "rotoscoping" software, and not limiting yourself to chroma keying. Mocha is built into after effects and is a good tool for this purpose, but if your machine's too old to run it, you should research whatever rotoscoping software was state of the art when your computer ...


1

For some reason the default subtitle colour often seems to be yellow; I can't find any definitive reason why though. I hate yellow subtitles with a passion, they always look hideous and distracting, so I always make mine white. To separate them from light coloured backgrounds I use a soft black drop shadow if possible, or otherwise a black border. As you can ...


1

Apparently Youtube took some extra time to process the HD. Both are showing in HD now.


1

Genlock would allow the capture of frames to be synchronized to a common external timecode. It is only a feature on pretty high end cameras, so if you are trying to keep costs down, it really isn't an option. The other question I linked to in the comment goes over a few possible ways to try to get usable sync for multiple cameras, but sadly, there aren't ...


1

You can use the speech recognition function within Adobe Premiere to (kind of) do this. It will analyze a long piece of video, and attempt to create a text script of the speech within the video. If you tick "identify speakers" before it begins, it will write "[speaker 1], [speaker 2]" etc each time it identifies a change in speaker. However, the success ...


1

Video heads need to provide for very smooth and controlled panning, and thus are a bit complex. I somewhat doubt you can accomplish your goal in budget as the cheapest fluid head on B&H is $45 and the cheapest brand I recognized is $85, just for the head. That's to say nothing of the cost of a light, compact and sturdy set of tripod legs. Certainly it ...


1

In video terms, aperture is often called iris as well and particularly in live video, it is fairly common to adjust the aperture to adjust light sensitivity. For both live and post produced video, it is also relatively common to use lenses with smoother apertures. Most photo lenses have apertures that click in to set values, but video lenses will sometimes ...


1

This feature is called "motion detection" in the video surveillance jargon and can be found on most IP cameras and NVRs. There is a large variety of solutions out there depending on the level of accuracy that you need, the ability to divide the monitored perimeter into zones, whether the analytics run off a live or recorded feed, the OS that you use, and ...


1

You could also use the Trapcode Echospace plugin to achieve the same kind of thing


1

In the special case of jpeg input, you can do it losslessly by just muxing the data into an MJPEG stream, saving huge amounts of CPU time. ffmpeg: how to losslessly encode many jpg images to a video? You're probably doing some kind of video editting on the results, so don't skimp on the quality of the files you make. Prob. best to use lossless x264 ...


1

Lossless requires such high bitrates that I have more trouble playing back lossless video than 5Mib/s lossy h.264, on my C2Duo (first gen) E6600, 2.4GHz. lossy 5Mib/s 1080p h.264 at 24fps plays perfectly without even having to use mplayer's -lavdopts threads=2 option. (single-threaded software decoding is enough.) My system isn't fast enough to play ...


1

If they are MOVs, the first thing I would do is find a computer with Quicktime correctly installed, to see whether they play on there. If they do, it could be a codec issue on your machine. Any Mac with Final Cut installed should do it.


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Like others have said, just load your video in anything and play with the brightness effects. Even a gamma curve could do the trick. Or save a frame of the video where you can see anything at all, and play with that in a still-image program like imview, and play with the brightness / contrast / gamma to see if there's anything still there worth looking at. ...


1

It takes a lot of bits to accurately, or nearly-accurately reproduce the input pixels, regardless of what they contain. The only exception is low-complexity stuff like a screen capture or animation, where big areas are EXACTLY the same colour, and/or at bit-for-bit identical from frame to frame. The difference between your intuition and real life comes ...



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