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You can calculate the maximum total bit rate that would fill the storage: 30GB ≈ 30,720 MB ≈ 245,760 Mb 10 hours = 600 minutes = 36,000 seconds 245,760 / 36,000 ≈ 6.83 Mb/s You need to encode to a video bit rate less than that maximum to account for the audio and any overhead. Plus, you probably want to leave some space free on the storage. I'd say that ...


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Looks like MP4 won't skip the edts boxes when creating MP4s. You should transcode to MPEG-TS and feed that into mediafilesegmenter ffmpeg -i in.mp4 -<transcoding options> -vbsf h264_mp4toannexb out.ts


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In general, it is done with a production switcher/vision mixer. I believe CNN uses the Sony MVS8000. Specifically, it is a DVE or resizer feature that scales and positions the video. The video is played back from another device, likely a video server, under the control of the newsroom computer system. They may also be using whatever software that does the ...


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I'm not sure why you would want to use normalize at all. You should use audio tracks and place the audio you need to adjust on it's own track. Then, using the audio mixer, apply dynamics to the audio tracks. You can then use the compressor within the dynamics filter, which you can use on all your tracks, to get your dynamic range all in line. On the clip ...


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Most video editors support marks, and importantly "in" and "out" marks. Generally, if you set your in and out marks for each of the 12-18 minute segments you want and render the sequence, what renders out is not the whole hour, but only the frames within the in and out marks. If you do that 5 or 4 times, you'll get the segments you want. There is ...


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The question's not entirely clear, but, yes, each new generation of the rendered file will lose some quality if you use the previous generation as the source, but not if you use the initial H264. To elaborate, let's call your raw capture as Generation 1 or Gen1. Then your H.264 transcode is Gen2. Now, after editing with Gen2, your export is Gen3. Now, if ...


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I just changed the title to focus on high-speed videography, which is a much, much narrower topic than videography (and cinematography) in general. The basics are these: due to persistence of vision, the eye can be fooled into interpreting a series of still images as if they are continuous motion at around 16 frames per second. There are a variety of ...


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Ok this question should probably be put on hold as it is way too broad for a single answer. If I understand you correctly, you're asking about both the technical and artistic aspects of both photography and videography, topics which people study for years in universities. So if you really want to learn all that stuff, sign up for a course at an university. ...


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You can use FFmpeg, a free command line tool to do this: ffmpeg -i input.mkv -vf pad=1920:1080:0:140,subtitles=filename.srt -crf 20 -c:a copy out.mkv The subtitles filter accepts ASS styling parameters, such as font size and margins.



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