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4

If the only difference is bitrate, then any container which accepts variable bitrate streams, will fulfill your requirement e.g. MP4, MKV..etc Step 1 is to encode your segments, ideally using the same encoder, to different bitrates with all other parameters being the same e.g. via ffmpeg, ffmpeg -ss 0 -t 5 -i input.mp4 -b:v 1000k seg1.mp4 ffmpeg -ss 5 -t ...


4

MP4 isn't an ideal format for intermediate saves. If you know you'll be re-opening the file, save it as losslessly as practicable, and use MP4 only for the final output. That said, depending on the encoder and settings you probably don't lose much if anything on subsequent saves. MP4 and similar codecs work by decimating the higher frequencies (details, ...


3

You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to do this. The basic command is ffmpeg -i input.mov -vf "setpts=(PTS-STARTPTS)/30" -crf 18 output.mov The 30 indicates the factor by which the video will be sped up.


2

I see four basic differences (in what I believe is the correct priority order): Lighting. The lighting on Kevin Spacey is classic three-point lighting with warm fronts, a 2:1 key/fill ratio, and cold back/rim/hair light. Proper 3-point lighting is the biggest difference between the pro look of episodic television and the amateur look of most YouTube ...


2

It's possible. Use ffmpeg -loop 1 -i image.png -f lavfi -t 5 -i anullsrc -i video.mp4 -i music.wav \ -filter_complex "[0]trim=duration=5,fps=N[pre];[3]showwaves=WxH:r=N[b]; \ [b][0]overlay=shortest=1[post]; \ [pre][1:a][2:v][2:a][post][3]concat=n=3:v=1:a=1[v][a]" \ -map [v] -map [a] out.mp4 The image and video have to be ...


2

Using ffmpeg, ffmpeg -i video.avi -vf field=top top%d.png and ffmpeg -i video.avi -vf field=bottom bottom%d.png


1

I'm not familiar with the setup you described, but does that adapter have some sort of iris control built into it? I have the adapter pictured below and it doesn't allow the BMPCC to adjust the aperture of the lens, which means I need to use the iris control to adjust the amount of light getting let into the camera. The vignetting is caused by how the ...


1

Use -vf loop=parameters filter, see fine documentation. Note that this currently will put all video frames in memory.


1

Use ffmpeg -re -stream_loop -1 -i file.flv -c copy -f flv rtmp://x.y.z This option is buggy when the input it is applied to is filtered with another input, like in an overlay. For a single input - output chain, it works fine.


1

Yes. By definition, any time you save an audio or video file using a LOSSY compression scheme, you will lose something (by definition). Now, modern codecs have been getting better at minimizing perceptible losses. But it is always preferable to avoid ANY extra compression steps. Until the project is completely finished and ready for distribution, it is ...


1

If the codec is not lossless, such as Quicktime Animation Codec; true lossless, then yes. But if you are using a good encoder, I would gather even after 100 generations of degredation would you be able to even visually see the difference if you continually re-encoded the file outputs using MP4 at a high bitrate- say 30mbps for 1080p. Lower bitrates, ...


1

Yes. Every time you "save" video in video-editor, you will re-render it with codec. Most codecs lose some video information for compression. So, every time you will lose some more information.


1

That is not a good solution. With this solution you are now locked at the size and position of your window, not the source media. If you want to zoom in or out you have now lost that ability. Better solution is to use the timing controls and set the end condition to "Hold"



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