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4

You need two things - a PAL VCR and a digital video converter than can speak PAL. The last one I bought (in 2005) was software configurable for (or could autodetect) PAL and NTSC, and several that show up on Amazon appear to be both PAL and NTSC compatible. It looks like VCRs that are PAL compatible are available on both Amazon and EBay. When acquiring a ...


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Most modern codecs will support whatever frame rate you throw at them. The choice is more of an artistic decision than a technical one. For the best quality, you should match the frame rate of your source or some even multiple there of. If you can choose on your source, then choose according to the feel you want. 24(23.976) is more "cinematic" and is ...


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If your source footage is interlaced, deinterlace it. If your progressive frame rate is a constant 23.976, 24, 25, 29.97, or 30 fps, then keep the frame rate as it is, unless you require a very low bitrate and want to halve the frame rate. These are all widely supported frame rates, although other arbitrary frame rates below 30 fps will often work as well. ...


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There are some storage calculators: AJA DataCalc, Video Space Calculator. Nothing complex, but keep also in mind that actual required storage size will be more than raw disk size due formatting, RAID levels etc.


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A 'base' value is ~33 GB per hour for 8-bit RGB at 24fps. Multiply by 1.25 for 30fps, and/or by 1.5 for 12 bits/pixel, or 1.25 for 10 bits/px. 3840x2160 = 8294400 pixels per plane x 3 for RGB = 24883200 px per frame x 24 fps = 597196800 px per sec x 60 sec = 3.5831808 x 10^10 px per hour x 8 bits per pixel, / 8 bits per byte = ...


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Yeah! Welcome to the good ol' world of analog television. When they originally introduced color television and put a high frequency chroma signal on top of the black- and white luma signal, they had to introduce a freqeuncy shift to prevent the signal from bleeding over into the audio .... oh, you don't want to know. Srsly! Even in times of digital video ...


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Native resolution is always better than non-native. If it only has a resolution of 720p, then it would have to be down-converting to that resolution which means it has to blend pixels which can produce artifacts from the pixel blending. (Notably, softer edges is the most likely.) Update: I'm sorry, re-reading, I noticed that it isn't native for either ...


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The logo on the manual I could find indicates that it was standard 8mm, not Hi8 or Digital8. If you are in a PAL region, then most likely it is the PAL version of 8mm. You should be able to use any PAL based 8mm playback deck or camcorder to play the tape back. You then be able to use a standard video capture device to digitize the video that you ...


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On a side note, I believe the power is required for the analog to digital converter in wireless transmissions, and not the signal itself, since there is +5V DC power running through one of the pins. So you might actually have better luck searching for USB powered signal converters, because once the signal is digital, you're home free. Something like this: ...


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I don't think it has been an issue for some time. I've been using Premiere since version 5 and don't seem to recall ever having a problem with exports though I don't recall my work area ever extending over a gap (though I certainly had many projects where there were gaps between work areas.) I did verify that in CS6, it is no problem.


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Any VCR to PC capture device should do the job.IF you can find a VCR which can play PAL. Usually these type of players are sold in the Indian or Arabic neighbourhoods. I think it is not worth the effort to buy one and deal with the capturing. Simply find a place close to where you live, where they can do it for you. The average cost is $5 to $10 per tape. ...



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