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There are a few video quality metrics available for you to use, primarily SSIM and also PSNR. You can use ffmpeg to convert the video and then compare the output. Step 1 Convert the video ffmpeg -i actioncamfile -c:v libx264 -crf 23 -c:a copy -map 0 compressed.mp4 The CRF value modulates the quality. Lower values produce better quality but larger file ...


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after posting this I randomly stumbled upon a setting in Preferences. Preferences -> Memory Optimize rendering for performance Changed to "Memory" Looks fine now.


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You can't avoid the re-encode. They do this to be sure that every video they serve is in a standardized format, resolution and bitrate. It would be inefficient and risky to vet all diverse set of incoming files to check if they meet all their parameters, some of which are not easily available to set or tweak at the user's end.


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Bottom line with the canon rebel series cameras is that the video is pulled from a low resolution capture of the chip which is normally used for high resolution photos. The photos from these cameras will resolve many thousands of lines but the video compression chip in the camera cannot deal with these in real time so they just grab the image that goes to ...


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The Simple answer is going to be "No" That may sound harsh but you cannot as there are so many factors that were involved with this video unless you want to buy similar kit to the guys who made the video. The main thing being the camera and lenses they used Tech spec: Red Epic (M642) w/ Ti Canon Mount Canon 24-70mm F2.8 Canon 16-35mm f/2.8 Canon 100mm f/2.8 ...


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Go for the HD 1280x720 and get it compressed using Handbrake or ffmpeg or similar to H.264 video in MP4.


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When you export with h.264 in Premiere it has two bars as you show. A target bitrate, and a maximum bitrate. The target bitrate is after all, only a target, and if your video doesn't have enough movement or fast action then you won't get the full Mbps that you've set. Even lowering it enough to only export 12Mbps because your video doesn't have a lot of ...


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There's no standard resolution for such displays. They're generally made up of a collection of individual (usually square) panels or "tiles", of say 16 x 16 LED pixels. You can construct a display having hundreds of tiles horizontally but only a few tiles vertically, like the Fremont Street experience in Las Vegas, which has an aspect ratio of about 14:1 ...


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If you're using After Effects, when you create your comp, the only settings you need to define are the number of pixels horizontally and vertically, the frame rate, and the pixel aspect ratio. If you know the specifications of your LED screen, (I'm assuming it's a jumbo outdoor screen), you should be able to calculate the aspect ratio from the physical size ...



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