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Definitely, it will degrade the video quality after many times of converting. I advise you to convert the file to the one with original settings. The best choice is to use a video editor which allows you to edit and convert files to desired ones.


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All codecs, unless they are truly lossless, suffer from concatenation errors. Every time you encode with a codec, decode, and re-encode with the same or a different codec you will degrade the quality of the video. It isn't as precise to figure out just how bad it will be as when you could count the generational loss of re-recording to tape as the source and ...


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It's weird. I see all resolutions - upto 1080p - on Youtube. And the thumbnail hover does show the full frame as seen in your VLC snapshot, but not in the playback window on Youtube. youtube-dl shows streams in a 1:2 ratio i.e. 540x1080, 360x720, which would be what you're seeing locally. You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to crop out the ...


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Yes. By definition, any time you save an audio or video file using a LOSSY compression scheme, you will lose something (by definition). Now, modern codecs have been getting better at minimizing perceptible losses. But it is always preferable to avoid ANY extra compression steps. Until the project is completely finished and ready for distribution, it is ...


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If the codec is not lossless, such as Quicktime Animation Codec; true lossless, then yes. But if you are using a good encoder, I would gather even after 100 generations of degredation would you be able to even visually see the difference if you continually re-encoded the file outputs using MP4 at a high bitrate- say 30mbps for 1080p. Lower bitrates, ...


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MP4 isn't an ideal format for intermediate saves. If you know you'll be re-opening the file, save it as losslessly as practicable, and use MP4 only for the final output. That said, depending on the encoder and settings you probably don't lose much if anything on subsequent saves. MP4 and similar codecs work by decimating the higher frequencies (details, ...


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Yes. Every time you "save" video in video-editor, you will re-render it with codec. Most codecs lose some video information for compression. So, every time you will lose some more information.


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I routinely upload videos of an hour or more to YouTube and Vimeo and have found that although FCPX is my editor of choice, it can't handle web uploads as easily as you would hope. For our long shows, it has been proven easier to export a master ProRes file for archiving purposes and then dropping that file into Adobe Media Encoder for further processing. ...



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