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h.264 supports various color info in the bitstream. From x264 --fullhelp: --range <string> Specify color range ["auto"] - auto, tv, pc --colorprim <string> Specify color primaries ["undef"] - undef, bt709, bt470m, bt470bg, smpte170m, ...


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As an example, this Khan Academy video is uploaded as 720p to YouTube. Youtube's upload recommendations for 720p are: Standard quality: Video Bit RateRate Stereo Audio Bit Rate 5000 kbps Mono Audio Bit Rate: 128 kbps Stereo Audio bit rate: 384 kbps High quality: 720p 30,000 kbps 128 kbps 384 kbps 512 kbps resolution: 720 p: 1280x720


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Format doesn't really matter, I usually use something fairly common like .mov or .mp4. The more important thing is the codec. Usually when exporting for online upload, H.264 is the most common codec because of its balance of size and quality. For resolution, either 1080p or 720p. Most people can't tell the difference between the two, but 1080p is the ...


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Generally, you want to mix color for ideal conditions, not the common situation. It is up to people to do the best they can to adjust their systems to support a vivid and clear image. If you mix to try to make it look the best on some "average", not only will it look bad on any good displays, but it will also look bad on any well adjusted average displays. ...


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No, such a thing does not exist. You can get some very rough guidelines in terms of things like suggested recording profiles for Youtube, Vimeo, or bitrates used by Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Instant Watch, but at the end of the day, the bitrate needed for a given resolution is entirely content dependent as well as dependent on how much time you can spend ...



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