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10

Vegas is a mature, full-featured NLE. I use it regularly for professional work from spots, to corporate video to feature films. I've also used it for semi-professional things like editing a video of my stepdaughter's choir concert for a Christmas DVD. Here's where I run into problems. My producing partner is all about FCP. There's no clean way to export an ...


8

With your budget, I would suggest investing in a few basic lights and decent audio recording equipment. While a second camera is nice to have, creating production value with the non-picture parts of your films will make them a lot better. If you need to get second or third angle, just move the camera for a closeup and re-run the scene. Sure, it may take ...


8

HD simply refers to a given number of pixels in the signal, not some measure of quality. Even 1080p TV is lower resolution than the photos on most camera phones. Even the 4k video used in the latest Hollywood blockbuster movies is lower quality than the still photos of most camera phones. Video takes up far FAR more data than stills. If you think about ...


5

The ability to set custom white balances largely makes color filters unnecessary. The only thing they really (potentially) offer is better dynamic range. With a white balance adjustment, it alters the processing of what the sensors pick up, but if there is a really bright orange area for example, it could overload those sensors and thus detail would be ...


5

Rovi does try to add an element of security but the simple truth is that once it is being played, there is actually nothing you can do to prevent it being copied. Unless you control everything (including the screen) then an attacker can just wait until the encryption has been removed and copy the output. So this could be in memory, on screen, by intercepting ...


5

What you are missing is that not every frame is stored as a picture. A large number of frames are stored simply by keeping track of what changed from the previous picture. If you think about most video, not a whole lot is actually changing since the majority of the scene stays the same or moves in a similar pattern. By describing only the changes, the ...


5

The sensor in your camera has about 18 megapixels, and all those MP are used to record pictures and movies. What's different is how the sensor data was processed on the picture and the movie. Scaling For the picture you scaled down the original 18MP picture using Photoshop, GIMP or similar. This was probably a high quality scaling operation, so the ...


5

The effect that you've seen is a side effect of the compression algorithm that was used to encode the video. The most common compression algorithms (MPEG-4 and MPEG-2 among them) compress different frames with different methods, and that is why two very close and relatively similar frames may look so different. The frame that looks pretty good is likely a ...


5

No, there is no practical limit that we know of yet to what would be best, there is however a practical limit to what we can capture and display. In tests with airforce pilots, subjects were able to identify a plane from being shown a frame for only 1/220th of a second.1 They eye is able to pull information out of extremely short periods of time, but ...


4

The way you've phrased this question makes it meaningless. Of course you can use Vegas for professional and semi-professional work. Of course you can compare the output of Vegas with other professional production tools. The problem is that "professional and semi-professional work" is such a broad field that you will always be able to find some situation ...


4

Personally I always choose MP4 container and the H.264 codec as this is also the codec YouTube uses in the final video stream. What key-frame rates and compression you need really depends on the footage and it's unfortunately close to impossible to give as a generic answer for this reason. If you have a lot of movements you will need key-frames more often ...


4

No most video formats (nearly all) do not allow custom ICC color profiles to be embedded. most video on the consumer end is intended for the REC.709 color space. sRGB is similar and uses the same primaries. transcoding (including compressing) will almost always result is a slight shift in color accuracy, saturation, gamma curve, or black and white level ...


4

48 to 25 should be better because you have more frame information to interpolate, though the contents of the clips could also matter. If all the 48 fps clips are high speed motion while the 25 is relatively static shots, then it will probably interpolate better. The key is that frames are going to have to be guessed at and the less time that passed from ...


4

DVD and Blu-Ray content makes massive use of lossy encoding. An easy way to see for yourself is to find a dark scene in a film, and then pause it. If the only issue was a limited number of black levels, you would expect to see a stepped gradient curve from the darkest region to the lightest region. Of course, if true 24-bit color was being used, the ...


4

Trade in the iPad and buy a desktop or laptop that you can edit on. You will not produce professional results entirely on an iPad. I am not aware of any good video editing options for iPad, certainly none of the big names have a product available. There simply isn't enough horsepower on a tablet to perform the hard, complex operations involved in video ...


4

With low light levels your brightest signal will be close to the noise floor, so you only really have three options: a camera with better low light performance (although this can only take you so far) More expensive sensors can give a lower noise floor, allowing you to resolve more detail a faster lens As Jason commented: If the widest aperture ...


3

Generally speaking yes. This makes it easier for your camera to define the correct colors. Normally you gain experience best by committing errors or by analyzing the errors of others. So, if you see an image that is too cold, the color temperature / white balance should be higher. If it's too warm, the color temperature should be lower. If you have two ...


3

1080p on a native 1080p TV will always be (much) higher quality than 720p on the same screen. The only thing I can think of that they might have been thinking is that 1080i on some TVs is lower than 1080p if they have a particularly bad de-interlacer (drop one of the two frames). This would result in a 540p video stream. 1080p is always higher quality ...


3

Whoever told you that was wrong. "1080p" has 1920 horizontal pixels and 1080 vertical pixels. "720p" has 1280 horizontal pixels and 720 vertical ones. See this wikipedia page. You would want to use 1080p whenever you want the highest quality your television is capable of reproducing. The only reason you'd use 720p is if file size is a concern, or if ...


3

This is certainly more work, but if you want a truly authentic and "organic" VHS look: Go find a used VHS recorder (or two) at a thrift store (you might have one sitting around your house!) Get some blank VHS tapes at a Walgreens (they still sell it) lay off your video onto VHS tape (for extra authenticity, copy it again to a second recorder and repeat as ...


3

Every decent video editor has built-in filters (like Color Correction, Film Effects, TV simulator, Color Curves, etc.) that can be used to achieve the desired 'look'. There are plug-ins and tools that contain many ready-to-use presets, such as: Magic Bullet Looks Film Looks SVP Adobe SpeedGrade DaVinci Resolve etc.


3

Not enough info. Try getting a copy of the GSpot Codec Information program (google it) and report back here what it says about the file. Size is almost certainly not the problem.


3

You're on the right track with -crf and x264 (the H.264 encoder), and it should provide the "quality threshold" that you're looking for. CRF is recommended if you want a certain output quality and output file size is of less importance. Conversely, performing a two-pass encode with -b:v is recommend if you are targeting a specific output file size and ...


3

Your guess is correct. That would be fully uncompressed, true to its settings. You're right, there's only so much data that disks can handle, so there's compression that does need to take place. We can't always notice it. That's why there's different formats (MOV, MP4, WMV). They all have their individual compression types. Compression, really, is just ...


3

Keep in mind that it is 14 bit color and there are 8 bits to a byte. So the uncompressed data rate would be height * width * 14 bits per pixel / 8 bits per byte * fps. That said, I'm not sure if they store it completely uncompressed. RAW images are generally compressed significantly, they are just compressed losslessly. I'm not sure if the MagicLantern ...


3

It sounds like the problem is probably what is known as dropped frames. There is unfortunately not any particularly good fix. With dropped frames, information is actually completely missing for the frames where there was no update, thus there is nothing to play during those frames. Depending on the length of time that is dropped, it may be possible to ...


3

It is likely not possible to change in camera. For power and efficiency reasons, cameras generally use dedicated encoder hardware to encode the video in real time (this is why your camera can encode h.264 video live, but when you try to encode it on your PC, it takes longer, even though your computer is far FAR more powerful.) The caveat of this is that ...


3

Depending on your definition of high quality, this is impossible. For comparison sake, DV video (at standard definition) takes a gigabyte per 4.7 minutes, which is at a good, high quality level of compression. You are trying to do 60fps 1080p video and get it under 2GB for 4 minutes. That's over 12 times the information and you are trying to fit it in ...


3

I assume the actual data rate is 3.3 Mb/s, not MB/s (bits, not bytes). This is very low for 1080p60, and artifacts are likely at such a low rate. You might consider capturing at at least double that rate. Alternatively (or also), halving the frame rate to 29.97 would double the effective bit rate. You would be trading some motion artifacting for less ...



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