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DVD and Blu-Ray content makes massive use of lossy encoding. An easy way to see for yourself is to find a dark scene in a film, and then pause it. If the only issue was a limited number of black levels, you would expect to see a stepped gradient curve from the darkest region to the lightest region. Of course, if true 24-bit color was being used, the ...


3

Your guess is correct. That would be fully uncompressed, true to its settings. You're right, there's only so much data that disks can handle, so there's compression that does need to take place. We can't always notice it. That's why there's different formats (MOV, MP4, WMV). They all have their individual compression types. Compression, really, is just ...


3

1080p is sufficient in terms of resolution, though 2k or better yet 4k is prefered these days, though resolution isn't the only measure of quality. The quality of the color and dynamic range of the camera and the use of a global shutter (or lack there of) can make a big difference on how good the footage looks in a theater environment, depending on what the ...


2

For distribution to theaters, typically the files are several hundred gigabytes to a terrabyte per film (depending on the quality level that they choose to distribute). Even for cinema, some compression is generally used though the quality is still higher than bluray. Even if they choose lossless, compression can still probably cut it down by a significant ...


1

I think if you leave the settings on auto it should do the job just fine. Especially if the reviews say it performs well in low-light, I don't think you'll have a problem with exposure. Personally, I've never used that camera, so I guess I can't say for sure. 1080P vs. 1080i is just progressive scan and interlaced scan. I won't try to explain the ...



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