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5

It is often called a lower third because it is a bar often appearing in the lower third of the image. Also sometimes a name plate or title plate.


4

That gadget actually combines TWO different functions: SLATE which is the lower portion that identifies Scene / Take / Roll, etc. in written form so that the camera(s) can document exactly what this clip is. Without that information editing would be an absolute nightmare for big productions. CLAPPER which is the part at the top. Essentially two sticks that ...


4

It is clapperboard: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clapperboard used in filmmaking and video production to assist in the synchronizing of picture and sound, and to designate and mark particular scenes and takes recorded during a production


4

For the three main rotations of the camera you have pan (rotation around the vertical axis), tilt (rotation around the axis passing left to right through the camera), roll (rotation through the axis passing through the center of the lens). Then there are the three main movements along those same axis. Pedestal is a movement along the vertical axis. ...


4

You don't need another term. Live Action is the accepted term for differentiation between, well, live action film and other kinds of movies, such as animation/3D films. It's also used consistently for this purpose, e.g. the Oscars use it in their category names: Short Film (Animated) Short Film (Live Action) Conversely, I have never seen this term ...


3

Terminology In theory, a camcorder is a video camera that also records video. A long time ago, this was an important distinction, since movie cameras (which are analog and record to film) and other now somewhat obsolete cameras didn't have inbuilt recording capabilites. (DISCLAIMER: opinionated paragraph ahead!) This distinction doesn't really matter ...


3

I can't cite any authority, but the term I've used and heard most often is handles. It's not just used for live shots, but refers to any trimmable material that allows for transition points to be adjusted, etc. In your example I'd say "this clip requires 10-frame handles".


2

This might even be more on-topic at English.SE, but as far as I'm concerned that's definitely called an epilogue. From Wikipedia: In many documentaries and biopics, the epilogue is text-based, explaining what happened to the subjects after the events covered in the film.


2

It sounds like you are describing shots. A scene is composed of one or more shots covering a consistent location and time. Each separate clip within the scene is simply referred to as a shot. The shot changes any time that the camera position is moved. Technically, if you are on a close up shot and cut to a wide angle and then cut back to a close up, ...


2

WMV is really just another name for ASF. That format, like many multimedia formats, contains its data in pieces of various types. Some formats call these packets, some call them segments. ASF, like RIFF before it, calls them chunks. There are several types of chunks, the main one being the data chunk, which holds the encoded streams. There may be several ...


2

This will get migrated but the short answer is that ALL-I stores every frame in it's entirety, whereas other methods store a certain number of keyframes in entirety, with the other frames stored as the difference to the keyframe.


1

The only other candidate that comes to mind is photographic, as used in the same sense as in Principal Photography. And photography does literally mean the capture of light. Only hitch is that photography in lay use is firmly associated with the capture of still images.


1

No, there is no BETTER term. But if you really require a DIFFERENT word (for undisclosed reasons), you could perhaps re-define the term "Cinéma vérité". If we had some clue about the motivation for needing a different term, we may have a better idea how to respond.


1

I have heard the term padding but don't know if it's a standardized term From The Art of The Edit: To allow time for a good transition, instruct your talent to fix a gaze on the camera for two seconds before and several seconds after a narration. A quick, sideways glance for approval, a swallow or a lick of the lips before or after speaking may be ...


1

It's take or shot ("Einstellung" in German) and cut ("Schnitt")


1

You may be referring to a "teaser" or "pre-cap". These are clips of upcoming shows designed to pique your interest and remind you of an upcoming episode. An ordinary teaser usually runs separately from the program, where (what we always called) pre-caps are teasers that run at or near the closing credits for an episode -- as in "Next time on XXX..." If ...


1

I am not aware of any particular term for showing the schedule. It's just a schedule of upcoming programs and may include playing teasers or previews, which are the video clips to promote upcoming shows. It could also be referred to as filler since it is content that is run while the credits are going (which they have to display) but want to fill it with ...



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