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5

While your self-selected answer will work, it requires modifying the file again when you do want the subtitles. Why not just create an empty but syntactically valid SRT file and mux that as the first subtitle stream (leaving the original as a secondary stream)? Even if the player is set to display subs, nothing will show up. No need to mess with ID strings. ...


4

As you are hardcoding subtitles, the video (with the subtitles added) will be re-encoded. You can use the CRF rate control method to modulate the quality of the output. So, start with ffmpeg -i grdedFinal.mov -vf subtitles=portSbs.srt -crf 18 -c:a copy gradedFinalwithSubs.mov If the quality's not acceptable, lower that value till it is - in exchange ...


3

What player are you using? Unless you have the "forced" flag set, it's a player option whether subtitles are displayed automatically or not and in which language if you have several subtitle tracks. First, set the "default-flag" to false: mkvpropedit video.mkv --edit track:s1 --set flag-default=0 Then lookup your player preferences. In VLC (2.0.8), I ...


2

Here is the structure of a .sup subtitle file and a link to the splitter I created. Information is either from linked reference or my own research. The .sup subtitle splitter I created. http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?p=1737122 SupRip github page with sup related code. You can read more specifics about each section here that I don't discuss. ...


1

If you convert the .srt files to .ass, then you can have a lot more control over how the subtitles appear. To convert use ffmpeg: ffmpeg -i input.srt output.ass This will give you an .ass subtitle file. You'll see in the header of that file that there will be details about font, size, placement colour and so on. Here's an example from Wikipedia: ...


1

There are two aspects to your query - 1)setting one of the subtitle streams as the default and 2)automatically displaying it during playback.I'm not aware of a method to force a player to display subtitles if that facility has been turned off in its settings. For the first facility, try mkvpropedit from MKVToolNix to set the default flag for a subtitle ...


1

You can try adding the original_size filter option, such as: -vf "ass=test_subs.ass:original_size=768x576" Specify the size of the original video, the video for which the ASS file was composed. For the syntax of this option, check the Video size section in the ffmpeg-utils manual. Due to a misdesign in ASS aspect ratio arithmetic, this is ...


1

I found some ASS files, like this sample, which contain a Video Aspect Ratio tag but it seems to not make a difference in ffmpeg hardcoding. The workaround I can think of right now is to create a complex filter where you create a transparent RGBA canvas of 1024x576; burn the subtitles onto them, scale the result to 768x576 or 720x576, depending on your ...


1

I gave up and contacted the author of mkvpropedit to ask if it was possible to do what I wanted to do. The first answer I got was 'No'. But I persevered and asked if there was any setting that will trick the player into not recognizing a subtitle track? The response was to set the Codec ID to something the player doesn't support. Eureka! mkvpropedit --edit ...


1

There is no professional tool that does this, as far as I know. It is never done, presumably because it would not be good enough and would need to be corrected by a human anyway. There are of course many subtitling applications into which you can import your transcript and then do the spotting by hand. And they have varying features to make it ...


1

Use the subtitles filter to create hardsubs ("burnt-in" subtitles): ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf subtitles=subs.srt -target pal-dvd output.mpg -target pal-dvd will make the output have a frame rate of 25 and a frame size of 720x576. If you want NTSC output instead for a frame rate of 30000/1001 and frame size of 720x480, then use -target ntsc-dvd. For a frame ...


1

The only way to do it with literally zero mathematical quality loss is to make a gigantic output file with a lossless codec. (e.g. utvideo, FFV1, or x264 in lossless mode (--qp 0). A better solutions that would achieve the same thing is: mux the subtitle file into the mkv, with mkvmerge. You set a flag so it either plays by default or doesn't. Then you'd ...


1

If you can use mkv instead of mp4 as your container format, there is widespread player and muxer support for various subtitle formats in matroska. (widespread throughout free / open source software. I can't comment on other players.) Then you can use SRT, ASS, and many other text subtitle formats. You can even use bitmap sub formats like VOBSUB (dvd) or ...


1

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-4_Part_17 "Timed Text" Format comes in many flavors example tools would be ffmpeg, subler, mp4box


1

Is there any reason to have two separate files? From my point of view, merging both parts of the video and editing the subtitle would be the easier way. You could split the file afterwards as you like and the subtitle would still be in sync if you mux it with the video. I would recommend mmg/mkvmerge to make a single mkv (the function is called append and ...



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