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4

If you work on a regular basis with the "owner" of the voice I can recommend Nuance's Dragon it offers very accurate speech to text with very few errors but it needs some "calibration" to a specific voice. So if you can get your actor/narrator to read the calibration text you will have an easy time making transcripts and subtitles (though subs will require ...


3

While your self-selected answer will work, it requires modifying the file again when you do want the subtitles. Why not just create an empty but syntactically valid SRT file and mux that as the first subtitle stream (leaving the original as a secondary stream)? Even if the player is set to display subs, nothing will show up. No need to mess with ID strings. ...


3

YouTube has several captioning options. At one time they had free computer generated captions which you could then download the results in a text file. YouTube currently provides this list of caption software and services.


2

We use a service called 3playmedia to do our subtitling. It's not free, but it's pretty cheap, considering the amount of work it saves - it's certainly cheaper than paying post production staff to do it. I'm not affiliated with them, just a happy customer.


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You should be able to define you own 3 character long language code for imported media using the option :lang=LAN when specifying your media file for import. LAN being your own language code. So you could use something like SCN and TCN.


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What player are you using? Unless you have the "forced" flag set, it's a player option whether subtitles are displayed automatically or not and in which language if you have several subtitle tracks. First, set the "default-flag" to false: mkvpropedit video.mkv --edit track:s1 --set flag-default=0 Then lookup your player preferences. In VLC (2.0.8), I ...


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I gave up and contacted the author of mkvpropedit to ask if it was possible to do what I wanted to do. The first answer I got was 'No'. But I persevered and asked if there was any setting that will trick the player into not recognizing a subtitle track? The response was to set the Codec ID to something the player doesn't support. Eureka! mkvpropedit --edit ...


1

There is no professional tool that does this, as far as I know. It is never done, presumably because it would not be good enough and would need to be corrected by a human anyway. There are of course many subtitling applications into which you can import your transcript and then do the spotting by hand. And they have varying features to make it ...


1

Use the subtitles filter to create hardsubs ("burnt-in" subtitles): ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -vf subtitles=subs.srt -target pal-dvd output.mpg -target pal-dvd will make the output have a frame rate of 25 and a frame size of 720x576. If you want NTSC output instead for a frame rate of 30000/1001 and frame size of 720x480, then use -target ntsc-dvd. For a frame ...


1

The only way to do it with literally zero mathematical quality loss is to make a gigantic output file with a lossless codec. (e.g. utvideo, FFV1, or x264 in lossless mode (--qp 0). A better solutions that would achieve the same thing is: mux the subtitle file into the mkv, with mkvmerge. You set a flag so it either plays by default or doesn't. Then you'd ...


1

If you can use mkv instead of mp4 as your container format, there is widespread player and muxer support for various subtitle formats in matroska. (widespread throughout free / open source software. I can't comment on other players.) Then you can use SRT, ASS, and many other text subtitle formats. You can even use bitmap sub formats like VOBSUB (dvd) or ...


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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-4_Part_17 "Timed Text" Format comes in many flavors example tools would be ffmpeg, subler, mp4box


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Is there any reason to have two separate files? From my point of view, merging both parts of the video and editing the subtitle would be the easier way. You could split the file afterwards as you like and the subtitle would still be in sync if you mux it with the video. I would recommend mmg/mkvmerge to make a single mkv (the function is called append and ...


1

Don't transcode your video, there shouldn't be any need to do that. You might be able to concat the two ogm videos into a single ogm, or mkv, without transcoding, just remuxing. (e.g. with ffmpeg's concat filter, and -codec copy) http://www.nikse.dk/SubtitleEdit has a split feature. You'll have to edit the 2nd file after splitting, since the split dialog ...


1

I Couldn't find a way to import into Aegisub, but If the subtitles are in a standard spreadsheet such as Excel, I saved as other format and chose Tab delimited text. Copy all the data in this text file and paste into Subtitle Edit. Then adjust limits on times (Will not overlap the next start time). Then save in whatever format you'd like to use in Aegisub. ...


1

Update with answer It can be done. Run your source files through Handbrake, after importing the subtitle files you want. Then export as Mp4. I've read (a) you should put the SRT file/s in the same folder as the Mp4 on your server, and (b) the SRT should have the same name as the mp4. But (a) is probably wrong (in a text-editor, you can see the subtitles ...


1

In that case Adobe After Effects can do this easily, which probably also produced the effect in the video. It's actually the only software where I know you can do this without too much manual labor. Other products usually only offer a timer effect which would be tedious to use for these kind of things. Though if you want to do this based on just a single ...


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Afaik apart from Blu-ray's and DVD's only MKV supports forced subtitles. If you want the subtitles to be "burned" into the video. Meaning they are part of the pixel frames you can use a tool like ffmpeg. A nice tutorial specific to mp4/m4v can be found here: ...


1

A player doesn't have to acknowledge the position of subtitles. So a user could re-position them if he wanted to. Thats actually the standard way of doing it. What you have there is a custom tag. The .srt format doesn't include any position data for the subtitles. Some players can recognize this sort of custom data and use it but you can't expect that a ...


1

This is not possible with Premiere without plugins and I don't know of any that would do this. I recommend doing this outside of premiere like explained in this question: Render srt subtitles to video?



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