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5

What you are missing is that not every frame is stored as a picture. A large number of frames are stored simply by keeping track of what changed from the previous picture. If you think about most video, not a whole lot is actually changing since the majority of the scene stays the same or moves in a similar pattern. By describing only the changes, the ...


3

Your best bet is to save them on two disks, that is two back up copies. A RAID sounds nice, but have you ever had to replace a RAID system with a faulty controller? It can be a nightmare. Forget RAID as a back up unless you are talking about an instant snapshot retrieval system that is online 24/7. If you are talking about a long term back up as in a real ...


3

mini DV is already digital format. The bitrate is 25Mbps. So, 1 hour occupies approximately 11 Gigabytes


3

Film is specifically a medium in which each frame is photographically exposed to capture the image. It comes in a variety of formats, but the key property is that it must photographically capture the image through photosensitive film. Magnetic media, regardless of being analog or digital, such as that used in MiniDV, Digital8, Hi-8 and even VHS tapes is ...


2

Any camera with an HDMI or SDI output can can stream via wifi using a Teradek Cube (http://teradek.com/pages/cube). This setup will allow you to monitor and record via iOS or computer. It also supports remote recording over the internet (decoder needed). In addition to WiFi, Terdek also supports 3G/4G/LTE cellular networks via a USB modem.


2

Original video material It depends on the protocol and color formats as well as the mentioned compression, but if you're starting in video I assume you're using HDV. A rough estimate based on the HDV format (the one you transfer over the FireWire cable) will give you around 19.2 Mbps (ironically less than the DV format), or 138 Mb per minute. If in the ...


2

I don't have experience with that particular Samsung camcorder, but I did do some long term recording on an older Samsung camcorder. My camcorder had a time lapse mode that allowed it to capture a frame every minute or so. It would record while plugged in to A/C power. Although the camera used the FAT32 filesystem with 2GB file limits, it was able to span ...


2

Don't trust any hard drive to be reliable! Always backup your footage, you can not trust any HDD, doesn't matter how reputable the manufacturer is. There are always monday batches. HDDs WILL fail at some point, so ALWAYS make backups. Bear in mind that you might find a RAID solution nice to use but that's not a real backup, backup drives are disconnected and ...


1

Personally, I use a 12 TB RAID array composed of 5 3TB drives. If any one of them fails, I don't lose any data, but if 2 or more fail at the same time, I am up a creak. Other plans can consist of RAID 6, which allows for 2 drives to fail, but at the cost of two drives worth of storage capacity rather than one (so 5 3TB drives would only give you 9TB of ...


1

It is approximately 11GB per hour, though I do tend to round up a bit when I make my calculations. Digital Rebellion has a handy Video Space Calculator on their website (also available as an iOS app). You can select the format, frame rate, and video length.


1

To answer the headline question, specifically about the medium: No. Tape is not film. It may substitute for or be notionally equivalent to film in a more general sense. But the body of your question makes it unclear exactly what you're asking. Could you edit it to make it more coherent?


1

There is the Eyefi product line which basically wraps a small wifi chip together with a small arm SoC into an SD package with some limited internal storage. http://www.eyefi.com/products/prox2 They do work but the range is rather limited and you have to use their software in order to use them. Also only SD cards in their product line which aren't used in ...


1

I'm not sure this is on topic here, but... Unless you're doing a lot of simultaneous access to the partitions or folders, there should be no discernible performance difference. It's all head movement and caching.


1

For DV footage, anything below 4.7 minutes per gigabyte is going to start being sub-standard for editing. That's the standard data rate for lossy compressed DV footage. Each generation of compression and the lower quality you make the compression, the less suitable for video editing it becomes. If you use a highly lossy format to store the video, after ...



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