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7

Eye drops or saline are certainly simple. Alternatives include blowing dry air at the face just before action, or rubbing the eyes. Can your actor not use the old tried and tested method of remembering the death of a childhood pet?


5

Two simple solutions: 1.) Plastic bag of blood with a fine wire/string stuck to it. Thread the wire through the wound hole in the shirt/leg/buttocks of the clothes, and yank. 2.) Lightly compressed air with a blood hose. Indy Mogul's first Backyard FX episode has a great video on building this kind of rig: ...


5

This is called stroboscopic effect. It refers to when the sample rate is synchronized or very slightly out of sync resulting in a much slower representation of the motion that results from taking a picture that is at the same point or slightly advanced point in a subsequent cycle of a higher frequency cyclic motion. You can actually do the same exact thing ...


4

Looks like text moving to a "Motion Tracking" effect. Basically it finds and follows 1 or more points in a picture then moves the text accordingly. If you use 2 or more points you can track the 3d angle also. Examples: 2D position only ...


4

You need a camera with a relatively large sensor and a fast lens. What you are seeing is actually a property of optics called Depth of Field. Only a certain distance from the camera can be in focus at any given point for a given aperture and focal length. The degree of how out of focus it appears is also relative to the size of the image being projected ...


3

Here's one idea for the effect, which you can even do in Premiere: Get a live-action camera shot where the camera is slowly trucking forward. In post-production, create a title that has at least one letter with a hole in it (A, B, D, O, P, Q, etc.). Lay the title over the top of the trucking-in shot. Animate the scale and position of the title over several ...


2

This is possible, though it wouldn't look real at all.. If you use Adobe After Effects you can just put both sources in one composition. Then you would turn on the 3D-mode on each of the layers. There is a button on each layer. If you click it there should be a small picture of a cube where you clicked. Then you press P on each of the layers to bring up the ...


2

Tough question, and I imagine that those effects may be combinations of many other effects (probably in a 3D package given the context of the video itself). Barnaby Roper has a pretty interesting skill set, and we could try forever guessing what he did without getting it exactly right. That said, you should be able to accomplish a similar effect with ...


1

Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


1

What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


1

I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...


1

You can recreate this effect with the CC Radial Blur effect set to "Fading Zoom" together with the Ripple effect or the Turbulent Displacement effect. Apply these effects to an Adjustment layer above your video layer and add a round mask in the middle with some feather to have the blur and distortion only on the sides of the screen. Use separate Adjustment ...


1

I'm unsure if there is a specific "official" word for this effect. I guess I would call it frequency synchronisation. This effect appears whenever the framerate (e.g. frequency your camera takes a picture) of you camera matches the frequency of another recurring action. It doesn't have to be the exact same frequency but a multiple of it. So if the rotor of ...


1

It's two very basic tools in After Effects. The first is simply either a perspective correction or a 3d transform depending on which way you want to do it coupled with an x/y movement across the frame. There are also a few different ways you can approach the blur such as using a layer as the basis of the amount of blur and using a mask or using a filter ...


1

Generally its totally possible to achieve this with Particle World, just play around with gravity adn particle emission rate and animate them accordingly. If you need a more advanced particle system use a plugin called Particular by Red Giant Software. Though its not free and costs money.


1

You want images of varying degrees of zoom that you can align and then scale between. You start from far out and as you zoom in, you fade in the image that is slightly closer (and aligned to the other image). Once the closer image takes up the full screen, you remove the first image from the background and place the next level of zoom in the correct spot ...


1

There's a good tutorial of how to do this at videocopilot, called earth zoom. The tutorial uses after effects, but the technique will be the same for whatever software you use. I'm making this answer a community wiki in case anyone wants to elaborate.


1

There's a good discussion of it – "it" being "datamoshing" here. Not just how it's done, but also why you probably should not do it.


1

If your editing software can produce motion from the still image you can just take the last frame of from the previous portion of the video and set the stationary and moving points (and if you are doing some 3D-like effect akin to rotating in the Z-axis also the depth values). Another approach is if you have a video that records the 'effect' and then you ...


1

I think you should use the "Bad TV" plugin to achieve this effect. It has a setting to glitch images, and make them look as though the encoding has broken: http://aescripts.com/bad-tv/ An example: ...


1

it's not super realistic but this tutorial uses the puppet tool in AE to simluate a ragdoll effect as the dude is crumpled over the hood. http://www.videocopilot.net/tutorials/advanced_car_hit/


1

With FCE I think your best option would be a plugin or something. I know you can make them with Apple Motion and After Effects though, or a really simple one with good ol' iMovie HD. Good luck in your search for the force.


1

If he/she is a professional actor you don't have to try and make him cry. It's part the actor's job. And again professional or not you cannot fake a cry without making the actor sad ( meaning just tears or fake ones ) . Otherwise the overall scene will seem fake. What you should do is make the actor understand why he/she has to cry in that scene and most ...


1

A 'menthol blower' is what I've seen recently used on set. The makeup artist will blow through it into the actor's eye to irritate it. A search on Google might give you some leads.


1

Create the emotion and use eye drops only as a final touch, if needed. If you try, you will find you can pretty much create any emotion at will. The actors should be sad when playing these parts, only difference is that when you are purposefully causing yourself to be sad, it's actually pretty fun.



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