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4

For video editing the Hollywood standard is AVID, however smaller production houses and indie filmmakers tend to use Adobe Premiere. The nice thing about Premiere, in your case, is that it dynamic links with After Effects where you can do motion graphics, composting and basic visual effects such as green screen removal among other things. To explain these ...


4

ffmpeg, a free multi-platform command-line tool, can do this. Use the volumedetect and EBUR filters on each of the files ffmpeg -i input.mov -af volumedetect,ebur128 -f null - 2> input.log This will produce a log file with the initial lines looking like this: [Parsed_ebur128_1 @ 0000000002d42400] t: 12.7 M: -32.7 S: -32.7 I: -30.7 LUFS ...


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If you want to save time and learning efforts, and you can live with limited control over the end result, you may want to have a look at: muvee Reveal Magix Fastcut GoPro Studio Sony Action Cam Movie Creator The later two are for free.


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I haven't used VLC as my primary player since 2007. I switched over initially to KMPlayer and then Potplayer. Potplayer allows fairly flexible splitter and codec assignment for decoding. It also sports a whole host of video and audio processing filters. In fact, I believe that one can use Avisynth filters to process the video during playback, too.


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You can use ffmpeg, a free command-line tool, to generate some synthetic videos in the required size and pixel format: Mandelbrot fractal ffmpeg -f lavfi -i "mandelbrot=s=3840x2160:r=24" -c:v libx264 -pix_fmt yuv444p -t 5 mb444.mov This will generate a 5 second UHD video @ 24 fps. You can experiment with the various parameters detailed here, such as ...


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If you use Windows, that Windows Movie Maker — your choice. It have everyting you need for basic editing. I myself work in Premiere, AE and Edius, but when I need something really simple, and do not have my computer with me, then using Movie Maker.


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There is Microsoft Movie Maker that comes free with Windows. It is part of the Windows Essentials package that is available for the recent versions of Windows. I have found it is quite simple to use and able to perform the simple set of tasks you list. There are a few online help guides and YouTube videos about using it. The nice thing is that as it is ...


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Here's a labor intensive solution. http://punkoryan.com/2011/02/08/shooting-360-degree-video-with-four-gopro-hd-hero-cameras Post if you have found another solution. I have some 3 camera video panoramas from the 1980's I want to stitch. thnks chris


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Maybe someone will chime in with an app suggestion that directly fulfills your need, but here's a temporary workaround - a bit convoluted, but should work. Create two folders A and B. Set folder A as the destination folder in the encoder. Apply a suffix to all the output files being generated, something innocuous like ENC e.g. Clip2015-09-25-23232-ENC.mov ...


2

There are a few video quality metrics available for you to use, primarily SSIM and also PSNR. You can use ffmpeg to convert the video and then compare the output. Step 1 Convert the video ffmpeg -i actioncamfile -c:v libx264 -crf 23 -c:a copy -map 0 compressed.mp4 The CRF value modulates the quality. Lower values produce better quality but larger file ...


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I believe that can be achieved with ffprobe. You can see example of getting json format from it here


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Editing and Visual Effects (Special Effects aren't done in a computer) are two very different disciplines. Its possible to edit in a VFX package, but your best bet is two different pieces of software. As for "what software is used for hollywood VFX", the answer is that Nuke, After Effects and Fusion all have hollywood credits to their name. You can get a ...


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Everywhere I have worked uses proprietary software, but many professionals use Swift: http://www.grassvalley.com/products/swift_create


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VFX on a phone is much different than actually doing it on a computer. You might want to take stepping stones to VFX and start by editing videos with a NLE. One of my favorites is Premiere Pro (though, it's been buggy lately). Once you learn how to edit videos, you can then move onto VFX with Adobe After Effects, or Hitfilm for more simpler stuff.


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Adobe's CC suite will use the GPU, but the benefit you see from it depends on the power of your GPU compared to your CPU. This feature set is called the "Mercury Playback Engine" and contains, among other optimizations, CUDA support for certain realtime effects (scaling, crop, etc) as well as encoding/decoding. However, most integrated or mobile GPU's ...


1

There are several ways of achieving this. Use a hardware solution. They are available from Datavideo or on most video switchers. Obviously, these cost money and the results are dependant on how well you've lit your setup. For a software solution you will, like you've mentioned, need to connect your camera's video output to your computer. (It seems you ...


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Take a look at Blender or Lightworks (both free). You can import footage and add text or shapes (simple one with Lightworks) to it.


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If you use the Windows operating system, you have the option to the movie maker. But if you use the Apple OSX operating system, you can use Final Cut. It's also important to say that the Adobe package, which includes After Effects and Premiere, also runs on both operating systems commented - Windows and OSX.


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It is possible in almost any video=editing software. If you are using Windows and you do not have much experience in video editing, than you can make it Windows Movie Maker. It is free and simple for beginners.


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I see that you have some Java experience from your profile. You could use Processing, a Java framework used to teach artists and designers programming and geared toward creating animation, video, graphics, and the like. There are many examples on the site that demonstrate basic animation, displaying images, etc. processing.org


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You could try stop-motion. Basically your taking a pic of the bus everytime you move it on the map, then putting it together as a sequence in your editing program. Bout the only free way I can think of


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All of these seem to be simple circle mattes, you just need an editing system that allows you to generate a circle mask that has an animatable position. You will need 3 pieces of media: 1- the original footage 2- the new actor to go in the circle (or a neutral shot) 3- the moving circle mask You will need to animate the circle to follow the original ...


1

Try QtCAM - An Open Source Webcam application for devices supported by UVC driver or any V4L2 compatible device. You can see the preview directly on your laptop. Their updated version has support for all USB cameras and you could download the source code from GitHub.


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MoviePy looks less intimidating than other scripting languages. It may be easier to script your time tag cutting tool with it. http://zulko.github.io/moviepy/


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If you are really adventurous why not give Blender a go? It is a 3D animation and compositing/tracking application. It is completely free and open (FLOSS) as well as being totally system agnostic. Run on Windows 32bit or 64 bit, MacOS 32 or 64 bit and Linux 32 or 64bit. The video editor is rather novel and a bit rudimentary but is supported by a large ...


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This is a really late response but I just stumbled onto the question. The software you're looking for is Adobe After Effects. Inside After Effects, you'll end up using the effect called "Time Remapping". Open After Effects Import all your frames as an image sequence Create a composition(whatever resolution/framerate you'd like) Drag your image sequence ...


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Personally, I don't think those videos look very good. I certainly wouldn't take their message seriously given their poor quality. But that point aside, many people use either Apple Motion or Adobe After Effects to create motion graphics. Motion offers "behaviors" that make moving objects around a little easier if you aren't familiar with keyframing.


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Blackmagic Design Fusion 8 is up for the challange. It is a very high-end compositing application. Available on Mac and Windows, and as of now completely free. You might need to find some tutorials to show you how to use it.


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I did find a product called Calypso by Haivision http://www.haivision.com/products/record-stream/calypso I've spoken with their tech support and they claim it can do the time sync functionality I desire. I recognize this product will be out of the price range for some looking for the same sort of thing. The multiscreener app screaming drills mentions ...


1

FFMpeg's vid.stab filter works well. You have to run it as a 2-pass process: detect, and then stabilize. If you're going to do more with the video later, after stabilizing, output to a lossless format and then point your other tools at that.



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