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5

At a certain time you can see the rocket at two places at the same time. What you are seeing has nothing to do with compression artifacts, but is frame-blending due to the slow motion effect applied (in the video) Let's say the video is recorded at 30 frames per second. You only have 30 'pictures' per second to capture the information. If you want to ...


5

This requires a repetitive motion and good lighting. You expose the position of the droplet on successive oscillation, but capture it at a slightly different spot on each. Thinking about it from the perspective of a ball bouncing. On the first photo, I take a quick photo of the ball on the ground. The ball bounces up and then back down. I then take a ...


3

You only need to overcrank the scenes you want to slow down in post. Editing and effects software make it easy to decimate from 60 (or higher) to 24 fps. You'll get better flexibility if you shoot your slomo scenes at a the highest exact multiple of the base rate that still gives acceptable exposure etc. So 96, 120 or 240 fps would be preferable if they work ...


3

There are a few things to consider. The MP4 spec was not designed for the playback of high frame rate files, because the files are highly compressed, and limited to using a single core for decompression. Even if you had 12 cores, the file would not decompress any faster. The easiest way to solve your issue is to either encode the MP4 into another codec, or ...


2

Depending on how much you are looking to slow down. Interpret as 50fps, and then once in your timeline, say it is a 25fps timeline. Then you can stretch the footage using time remapping, then you can turn on frame blending to the solid line...this will be good in most instances up to about 25% speed of original... Less than that the same, 25fps timeline, ...


2

You should be safe setting playback rate at 0.400. 59.94 is actually 60/1.001 and 23.976 is actually 24/1.001, so the 0.4 multiplier is technically exact. Switch off resample to be sure. Of course, how Vegas actually handles this internally is anybody's guess. One way to test this would be to generate a frame sequence just containing an incremental numeral ...


2

As 50ndr33 says, you need to shoot/capture at as high an FPS as possible. The more FPS the better the slow motion effect afterwards. Kronos is also a great plugin, but as he also states - it has some problems when footage isn't linear. If that's the case, you should have look at Twixtor. It's a bit more advanced (and more expensive) but it's better at ...


2

While it is true that 720p video only has about half the data of a 1080p feed, the other thing you have to realize is that when you push the system beyond it's limit, it may spend a lot of time trying to process frames that it doesn't finish in time. Depending on how the player is configured, it may give up and try to catch up rather than finish rendering ...


2

This type of problem is usually a side effect of the type of compression used. In order to minimise the bandwidth requirements, frames are simplified, reusing content from previous frames etc. And this can cause interesting video effects when key (whole) frames are corrupted or missed.


2

The reason we try to shoot at our target frame rate is because if we need to adjust the frame rate, the computer has to invent new frames to go in between our existing frames. This can result in artifacts in the image and generally reduces the quality. You are correct that 24fps is the standard for theater and also correct that you need to shoot a faster ...


2

I think you're out of luck. Official specs say 30fps max, and I can't find any documentation of a possible hack. http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Digital-SLR-Cameras/25478/D5100.html The most widely distributed slow-mo camera is probably the iPhone 5s-- I bet you could borrow one to play around with.


2

You can do it by adding transitions between the speed changed clips as described in the documentation section titled Add Transitions Between Speed Segments. They say: When two adjacent speed segments are set to play at different speeds, you can control how smoothly the video switches between the playback speeds. When there’s no transition between the ...


2

By shooting at higher frame rate, you can achieve great looking and frame accurate slow motion. Interpolation is not going to happen. But if you want to slow down your footage beyond the frames you have, you can use the right tools in your video editor, or Twixtor plugin, but of course it will not give you as good results as a dedicated high speed camera. ...


1

Just like with any effect property you can animate it by clicking on the little stop watch on the left of the effect property name (see below). You can apply the effect to just a single clip, you don't have to use it on the entire sequence, just drag and drop the effect from the effect list onto the desired clip and then animate the speed of the video via ...


1

The best way is to add more light, I see you mentioned not having the equipment to do so. There are a couple of home hacks to get around that. 1) Remove lamp shades and use the highest wattage bulb you can. I also prefer the clear glass bulbs sometimes with a diffuser over them. I find that tends to be brighter than the hazed bulbs but I have official ...


1

Two ways 1) Larger aperture (the lower the number the larger the aperture) letting in more light, but also narrowing your depth of field). 2) I would suggest a higher ISO, don't understand why that does not work for you. The current crop of camera's now are absolutely amazing at capturing low light environments that you cannot see with the naked eye. One ...


1

It could also be caused by interlaced source material, where half the image is recorded at a time. Fast-moving objects would be recorded in two different locations. When the interlaced signal is converted to progressive, the two fields are merged to create one frame with two rockets. However, given that there don't appear to be other interlacing artifacts, ...


1

The reason it plays back in slow-motion is because you recorded it in slow-motion mode. From Kodak's web page (my emphasis): 720p at 60 fps—for fast action and super slow motion playback Your computer have no problem playing back the video if CPU usage is just 30% and have a full frame rate of 60 fps. What you need to change this is to re-time your ...


1

Well the best method quality wise is using The Foundrys "Kronos" ( http://www.thefoundry.co.uk/products/kronos/ ). Its a similar tool like twixtor but delivers the better results (in my opinion). If you dont want to use that/spend money then use twixtor OR the built-in time remapping functions, you get the best results by letting either one of them do its ...


1

This footage was probably around 24 fps.. If you want to slow it down to 50 % of the speed you would need to shoot at 48 fps to be able to get 24 fps when played back in 50 % speed. If you don't you can see that it is a series of pictures animated. And if you shoot at 24 fps and slow it down 12 times you get only 2 pictures per second. BUT, there is ...



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