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8

FFmpeg is probably being used more than you believe. I think the BBC uses it for some workflows, there is evidence that Laika and Weta may use it, and there is a fork called FFmbc which is targeted for professional broadcast usage. YouTube probably uses FFmpeg to decode as shown by some unique decoding issues (but this was several years ago that I read ...


5

I work as an assistant editor on feature films, and use ffmpeg all the time, primarily for two purposes: Transcoding files to be uploaded for producers to view on digital dailies systems (Dax, PIX, etc). I've written up shell scripts that accept property-of and recipient strings as command line input, along with target bitrate, and then generate the ...


5

MPEG-2 doesn't seem to be an officially sanctioned codec for the Quicktime container. The official specification has a section related to MPEG-1 in MOV but not MPEG-2. The US Library of Congress also does not have an entry for the subtype MPEG-2 in MOV, like it does for MPEG-1 (just called QTV_MPEG). So, there's no official word on "allowable alternative ...


4

The main reason is support, usability and control. First, lets clarify that FFMPEG is an encoder, QuickTime Pro is a video utility that happens to include multiple encoders and Final Cut Pro is a non-linear editor and has nothing to do with encoders other than the fact it can output to an encoder (generally QuickTime I believe). For big budget commercial ...


4

You can use wonderful ffmpeg for your desired workflow. There is a guide here on this page but once you have the ffmpeg installed, you can simply cd into your folder with sequence, and type in your terminal: ffmpeg -f image2 -pattern_type glob -i '*.png' -vcodec qtrle -r 25 -s 1920x1080 test.mov To understand the options, you can check the documentation ...


4

You can use AtomicParsley to parse the metadata of a MP4-file. For example AtomicParsley /path/to.mp4 -T 1 will print the whole atom tree.


4

Cutting a video at a keyframe, without the slow and lossy process of decoding and re-encoding it, is only possible in the special case where you aren't applying any effects, overlays, rescaling, or anything. And where you're happy with bitrate and decoder requirements of the input. (e.g. h.264 High Profile, Level 4.0) Perhaps fancier editting software ...


3

That's way more than h.264 can handle. The maximum resolution for h.264 is 4096×2304 with Level 5.1 or 5.2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.264#Levels There are lossless codecs who can theoretically handle this video resolution but it would make no sense to do this. There is no hardware capable of playing videos in this resolution at any acceptable frame ...


3

I use it in my professional production chain all the time. Last week I was using it to batch through dozens of videos that needed subtitles burnt-in. It would have taken me weeks of tedious labour with Final Cut, it took me a couple of days burning the srts in with ffmpeg, and I was able to automatically rename the files and compress them for the various ...


3

I can recommend Adapter. It is a Wrapper for the ffmpeg package and does its job pretty well. Because of its easy UI. You could also use ffmpeg directly via macports, but I think that Adapter is far easier to control.


3

Using Quicktime Player 7 you can export any movie file as an Image Sequence Open your .mov file using Quicktime 7 File > Export In the Export dropdown select Movie to Image Sequence Open the options and set the export format (eg JPEG or PNG) If you want just the current frame leave the frames per second blank. Otherwise, enter hte videos frame rate and ...


3

Yes, for the Quicktime output module, choose to output RGB + Alpha using PNG or Animation codec. In Media Encoder, choose Depth as 32 Bit after selecting the same codecs as above.


3

File > Add to Render Queue > Output mode > Format 'Quicktime' / Channels 'RGB + Alpha' See if that works for you!


2

I guess you've uploaded a reference movie file, because this kind of movie is much smaller, and can not play without it's master. What you need is a self-contained movie. My suggestion: To avoid this, try to export your movie via the "Export…"-Item, but not with "Export for Web…". So you'll get a self-contained movie.


2

I think the short answer (one you may have already found) is no! I'm in a similar situation: I write music to picture and used to receive clips as .movs. I could then add final audio myself for showreel/web purposes. Now those clips arrive as mp4 and are useless and unchangeable. I can merge files in QT pro for viewing, but no saves are allowed. Editing ...


2

it is a problem with gamma settings youre using and QT has its own gamma settings, dont bother. it will display only in QT that way... also check for alphas, but im not so sure that mp4 can support alpha channels... only qt mov with animation codec has alpha.... as i know...


2

The good news is I didn't just overlook something. Transcoding .WMV to .MOV is a real problem. The bad news is that it cost me $29 to solve it. I purchased the "Player Pro" license for Flip4Mac by Telestream after reading this support article by Apple.


2

You will have to re-encode or use a tool to change your h264 level, f.e. this one http://coolsoft.altervista.org/en/h264leveleditor but its windows only, there might also be a Mac tool that does the same. Your video is encoded with High Profile Level 4.1. iOS only support Level 3.1 and probably the same with QuickTime on Yosemite.


2

.MOV is a container format, not a video format. As such it can contain media in any number of 'tracks' of audio, video, subtitles etc. In particular, video tracks may use any supported codec, not just Apple-specific ones. It's very common to see H264 encoded video in a MOV file, and H264 is widely supported on Apple, Windows and Linux platforms. So if you ...


2

Production codecs which supporting an alpha channel Apple ProRes 4444 / Apple ProRes 4444 XQ From the Manual: Apple ProRes 4444 and Apple ProRes 4444 XQ are ideal for the exchange of motion graphics media because they are virtually lossless. They are also the only Apple ProRes codecs that support alpha channels. DNxHD From Wikipedia: lossy ...


1

Only Prores 4444 supports alpha channels, see the manual: The Apple ProRes 4444 codec offers the utmost possible quality for 4:4:4 sources and for workflows involving alpha channels. It seems to work for me, using the Animation codec with "Millions of Colors+". I'm on a Mac using Adobe CC. Here are the steps I took: Export your AE comp using ...


1

You can also use qtfaststart -l fileName which outputs something more human readable like : $ qtfaststart -l myFile.mp4 ftyp (32 bytes) free (8 bytes) mdat (283805466 bytes) moov (3541465 bytes) The Python qtfaststart can be installed using this command: sudo pip install qtfaststart The qtfaststart sources are here


1

The Media Atom object does not have a Flags field, but the Media Header Atoms does: Flags - Three bytes of space for future movie header flags. In which case it's basically say, these values are reserved for future use, and presently are just byte alignment packing. In most RFC's these area's are called Reserved as compared to flags. This would ...


1

They are a type of metadata specific to the QuickTime container. They can contain all kinds of extra information for the video player to read out and use. QuickTime movie atoms have an atom type of 'moov'. These atoms act as a container for the information that describes a movie’s data. This information, or metadata, is stored in a number of ...


1

I don't know the Lightworks software, but it is possible to install just part of the QT software distro without the player, I've done this a couple months ago because I wanted the QT AAC encoder without the rest. IIRC, you download the EXE file, then you open it with 7zip, look at the contents, and extract just the library, a separate MSI, and install that. ...


1

Sadly there isn't really an alternative, many dll's coming with QuickTime are needed by programs like LightWorks or Premiere and After Effects. You can probably delete a portion of the QuickTime installation but in the end why bother? Just don't let it take over any of the file associations and disable the auto-updater so it doesn't nag you whenever there is ...


1

Afaik apart from Blu-ray's and DVD's only MKV supports forced subtitles. If you want the subtitles to be "burned" into the video. Meaning they are part of the pixel frames you can use a tool like ffmpeg. A nice tutorial specific to mp4/m4v can be found here: ...


1

QTCoffee let's you edit track information in QuickTime files, but it's OS X only and donationware: $ modmovie -list clip.mov Track list for clip.mov: * Video Track * Timecode Track * Sound Track $ modmovie -disable "Sound Track" -save-in-place clip.mov If you are on OS X, and if you have QuickTime Pro (included in the pro apps), I would rather ...


1

You need Quicktime 7 pro to get the full export options. Quicktime as it currently stands is a gutted shell of its former self. Can I suggest you use mpeg streamclip. Free, very widely used (by many professionals too) and a great tool for transcoding. That is unless you're handy with the command line, in which case you want ffmpeg.


1

To add on to AJ's answer, Vimeo has a dedicated page on their preferred compression settings; Youtube has the same. Check these out for some more specific information on which bitrate/codec to choose!



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