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6

FFmpeg is probably being used more than you believe. I think the BBC uses it for some workflows, there is evidence that Laika and Weta may use it, and there is a fork called FFmbc which is targeted for professional broadcast usage. YouTube probably uses FFmpeg to decode as shown by some unique decoding issues (but this was several years ago that I read ...


4

You can use wonderful ffmpeg for your desired workflow. There is a guide here on this page but once you have the ffmpeg installed, you can simply cd into your folder with sequence, and type in your terminal: ffmpeg -f image2 -pattern_type glob -i '*.png' -vcodec qtrle -r 25 -s 1920x1080 test.mov To understand the options, you can check the documentation ...


3

The main reason is support, usability and control. First, lets clarify that FFMPEG is an encoder, QuickTime Pro is a video utility that happens to include multiple encoders and Final Cut Pro is a non-linear editor and has nothing to do with encoders other than the fact it can output to an encoder (generally QuickTime I believe). For big budget commercial ...


3

Using Quicktime Player 7 you can export any movie file as an Image Sequence Open your .mov file using Quicktime 7 File > Export In the Export dropdown select Movie to Image Sequence Open the options and set the export format (eg JPEG or PNG) If you want just the current frame leave the frames per second blank. Otherwise, enter hte videos frame rate and ...


2

I guess you've uploaded a reference movie file, because this kind of movie is much smaller, and can not play without it's master. What you need is a self-contained movie. My suggestion: To avoid this, try to export your movie via the "Export…"-Item, but not with "Export for Web…". So you'll get a self-contained movie.


2

I think the short answer (one you may have already found) is no! I'm in a similar situation: I write music to picture and used to receive clips as .movs. I could then add final audio myself for showreel/web purposes. Now those clips arrive as mp4 and are useless and unchangeable. I can merge files in QT pro for viewing, but no saves are allowed. Editing ...


2

I use it in my professional production chain all the time. Last week I was using it to batch through dozens of videos that needed subtitles burnt-in. It would have taken me weeks of tedious labour with Final Cut, it took me a couple of days burning the srts in with ffmpeg, and I was able to automatically rename the files and compress them for the various ...


2

The good news is I didn't just overlook something. Transcoding .WMV to .MOV is a real problem. The bad news is that it cost me $29 to solve it. I purchased the "Player Pro" license for Flip4Mac by Telestream after reading this support article by Apple.


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QTCoffee let's you edit track information in QuickTime files, but it's OS X only and donationware: $ modmovie -list clip.mov Track list for clip.mov: * Video Track * Timecode Track * Sound Track $ modmovie -disable "Sound Track" -save-in-place clip.mov If you are on OS X, and if you have QuickTime Pro (included in the pro apps), I would rather ...


1

You need Quicktime 7 pro to get the full export options. Quicktime as it currently stands is a gutted shell of its former self. Can I suggest you use mpeg streamclip. Free, very widely used (by many professionals too) and a great tool for transcoding. That is unless you're handy with the command line, in which case you want ffmpeg.


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I don't think you will find a single clear tutorial as you are talking about a very very broad field and talking about multiple aspects of it. Many, many, many tutorials exist for help with encoding for YouTube or encoding for Bluray. In fact, most Bluray authoring software has pretty good walkthroughs in their help. Youtube itself outlines the basics for ...


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It can depend on the compression used, but generally yes, there will be a loss of quality, particularly if there is any alteration to the video. For a fairly low compression format like DV it probably isn't going to be much, but the best bet, if the format supports it, is to append the stream data and alter the file such that it has the necessary format or ...


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Your best bet is probably MPEG2 or MPEG4. Both are going to have quality loss compared to your high quality DV format though, but proportionally, they should be pretty good. You should be able to use Adobe Media Encoder to make the transition to whichever format you want to use. Simply setup a profile and drag all the files in to Encoder and let it rip. ...


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You could check out these links to see if they provide what you need: http://www.theneitherworld.com/mcpoodle/SCC_TOOLS/DOCS/SCC_TOOLS.HTML Caption Maker Pro: http://www.cpcweb.com/ And of course Scenarist and Encore, although both are DVD oriented you should be able to produce at least MPEG-2 with closed captions embedded: ...



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