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I believe this should only require setting up a landscape sequence for the vertical clip and rotating it in to place. I believe you can then use the sequence rather than the original clip as the multi-cam source in your final sequence. I haven't specifically tried it this way before, but I often use nested sequences for this general type of problem.


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I have to thank @ProfessorSparkles for getting me to this solution, which doesn't require saving and reimporting, or making a duplicate of the source footage. Here are the steps: 1) I started with the 2 clips I'm using in the same bin. 2) Drag the landscape-oriented clip to the timeline. That creates a sequence with landscape orientation in the bin. ...


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You will have to rotate and transcode these videos before making your multi cam sequence. You can either do that by making a 1920x1080 standard sequence, inserting the video there and rotating it by -90° and export it, then re-import the newly encoded video. If for some reason Premiere doesn't play along or you happen to do this automated because you have ...


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Never mind, I figured it out. Look at the timeline in the picture in my original question. Next to the multi-camera track, the "V1" is not selected. I selected that, and the multi-camera view came back. (I thought the "V1" just indicated which track a clip would be pasted to! Guess not.)


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An incredibly easy way to cut this "by hand" would be to nest your alternating clips and turn that nested sequence into a multicam sequence by right-clicking the nested sequence and hitting "Multicam > Enable". Then, by going into the Multicam Editor (Open this in your "Windows" or "View" menu), you can press play and hit "1" and "2" on your keyboard to cut ...


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Unfortunately, there isn't a way to do this in Premiere in my experience. As far as I know, the only panels you can have multiple of are the Project and Sequence panels.


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1) In addition to the meta-data panel that Gin-San mentions, you can also right click on a clip in the project explorer and hit properties to get details about the file, which I believe includes the frame rate. 2) The new sequence settings are the settings that match your input video. So if the video is a 60fps video, it will end up making the output of ...


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To answer your Questions in order: You can see the framerate of a clip or sequence by navigating to the metadata panel. It's usually one of the tabs in the upper left on the standard layout. If you don't see it, select Window -> Metadata. Generally, you should set sequences to match you source material. So if your camera records 720p @ 60 fps, stick to ...


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Building on the cut/paste workflow. You could create the clip in AfterEffects and make it very long. Then just dynamic link to your project. This way at least -every time you need to use it- you don't have to copy/paste over again. Just drop the one clip and size to need. Also can be useful if you need a varying opacity through the clip, since you don't ...


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This is a fast way to copy the clips in succession. Copy the video clip CMD/CTRL + C Target ONLY the track that the loop will be on Then swiftly insert it multiple times by just holding down CMD/CTRL and pressing V multiple times in a row


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Without know more about the specific codec used on the file we can't say too much. One thing you can try is transcoding it with Adobe Media Encoder to another format that you know will work in CS6


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OK, after using different encodings, recording in different modes, trying different field recorders, trying different NLEs, I refreshed my PC (Windows 8 Refresh), reinstalled my drivers, updated, reinstalled AE and PP and it works. So it was a confliction with some sort of 3rd party program, driver, or errant system file, etc.


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It is possible that Premiere is detecting a spanned file and automatically connecting them. If a file goes beyond 4GB, it may have to be split in to two files due to limitations of the file system used on some memory cards. It is possible that when you load the file in to Premiere, it recognizes the file was split and puts them back together for both parts ...


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To import into Premiere Pro CC 2014 simply click on the Media Browser tab and select (or multi-select) the files you wish to import. Right-click and click import. Note if you double click on a file, default behavior is to open it for preview. Here's an adobe help on importing as well: ...


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I don't think there is a way to accomplish this, since you can apply effects on nested sequences as well as to single clips, which means the nested sequence might look different in the main sequence than it does in the nested one. My humble guess is that that is also the reason why Premiere does not use the existing preview files. A workaround would be to ...



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