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5

I can't give an After-Effects specific answer, but maybe this will help.. 1 - If you want to color a specific part of the image, deal with "region based filtering." In DaVinci-speak, that's Power Windows. Masks, Shapes, Roto. However you phrase it. That's how you tell the computer what part of the image you want to effect. Tie the mask to a tracker so ...


5

While chroma-keying is a good technique for dealing with solids, it doesn't work so well when dealing with transparent or semi-transparent objects. Because the difference can be very subtle, you want to copy the difference instead or blend off luminance. In Premiere, you can use the Set Matte effect to set a track as a luminance matte. In the case of the ...


4

There's a philosophical difference between delivery codecs (e.g. mpeg4, avchd), editing codecs (e.g. DNxHD, ProRes, Cineform), and capture codecs (e.g. r3d, DVCPROHD). While almost any codec can be used for each of these three stages, your workflow needs will help you decide which are best suited for each stage. The question you seem to be asking, is ...


4

You can use the multi-camera feature in Premier to achieve this. From Adobe's page: To easily synchronize footage from all cameras, make sure each camera records a sync point using a clapper slate or other technique. Keep each camera recording to maintain synchronization. After you capture the footage in Premiere Pro, use the following workflow to ...


4

Premiere Pro CS5 should be able to import H.264 video, IIRC, however it may be having trouble with the audio and/or container format. With ffmpeg try re-muxing the video stream without the audio: ffmpeg -i input -an -codec:v copy output.mp4 -an -codec:v copy output.avi If both output.mp4 and output.avi work then we know that the issue lies with the audio ...


4

Adjusting the default video transition duration Go to Preferences -> General and change the Video Transition Default Duration to a frame amount of your choice. Optimising current workflow I can think of some optimalisations regarding your current workflow. It's not a drastic change, but might help you do the task faster. I would suggest splitting the ...


4

First off, you would normally use After Effects for special effects such as Chroma Keying. That being said, Premiere Pro is capable of chroma keying quite decently. Here's an example using free smoke effects by JohnnyFXEffects. Set up your scene as you usually would, and then go to the 'Effects' tab. (1) From the 'Keying' folder, select the 'Chroma Key' ...


3

I dont know of any software for Premiere that can do this (there are plugins for After Effects but cant find any for Premiere - thats not to say they arent out there). I think your best option would be to export your sequence as an XML. You will loose any CS5.5 features there are not in CS3, but this would occur regardless of which method you use to get ...


3

Drives are definitely the answer. My miniDV setup worked fine with 5400rpm, but HD playback looked like internet video from 2004. Upgraded to 7200rpm internal SATA drives, and ~most~ of the time, I've got good results. While I've never done any work with SSDs, I suspect those would be the ideal circumstance. For external drives, I've used 5400rpm USB2.0 ...


3

If you have a 8 core CPU I'd bet it is a fast one too, so that shouldn't be a problem. 16 GB is more than enough for HD, and DDR3 should ensure the speed. The GPU shouldn't have much to say as long as it's not crap. If you have 6 slow harddrives, it would be a bottleneck. You should have at least 7200 rpm disks!


3

Is the watermark a video or a still image? If it's a still you can usually just increase its duration. Otherwise, copying and pasting is the best way to go about it. Copy and paste it 10 times, then select the 10 clips, copy and paste that 10 times, then select the 100 clips, copy and paste that etc. until you get the desired duration.


3

Have you rendered the work area? Unrendered clips can lead to lag in the playback. If you have rendered your clips the bar above your clips in the timeline should light up green instead of red or yellow (see picture below). If the bar isn't green, go to Sequence->Render Entire Work Area. Done!


3

I think the traditional knowledge is that if you want to be an editor, then you should know how to drive all 3 of the major programs (Avid, Final Cut Studio, and Premiere), and maybe some of the less mainstream broadcast editing and finishing systems (e.g. Smoke). You should probably know a handful of specialized audio programs too. Lucky for you, the ...


3

If you're not impressed with X then I'd suggest going back to version 7. Learning your way around a new program will be a pain in the arse. I'm not sure how professionally you work but if you can be bothered, Avid is a great program once you get to know it. Otherwise, man, I'd probably just get used to FCPX.


3

After Effects CS5.5 has the Warp Stabilizer (also check the video on the main Adobe After Effects site).


3

Select the clip you wish to work on in the browser, then in the top menu bar for FCP, select Mark > DV Start/Stop Detect. This will break the clip up by the start/stop metadata generated when you were shooting. The options in the user preferences are for timecode breaks that occur during capture. ps: I don't know when this DV Start/Stop Detect feature was ...


3

If it's NTSC/standard def/4x3, 640x480 will be good. If it's HD/widescreen/16x9, 1920x1080 or 1280x720 (1080p and 720p, respectively). Premiere will likely have presets for all of these aspect ratios. I would ask the projector owner for the pixel dimensions or pixel resolution. Likely, it'll match one of the above pixel dimensions. If the owner's not very ...


3

Turns out that one should use the Motion effect and not the Transform effect for zooming in Premiere, even though they have exactly the same Position and Scale controls! Here is the result with the Motion effect p.s. The Anti-Flicker filter I discovered under the Motion effect was left to the default of 0, so that was not needed. p.p.s. I also found this ...


3

It looks like a problem with the playback engine. I would try updating your video card drivers and/or making sure the playback engine (in the project/ project settings/general menu) is set to Mercury Playback Engine Software Only. If that doesn't work, I'd try uninstalling and re-installing Premiere. I don't know what can cause it on Mac OS, but on ...


3

Premiere is simply a tool. While learning how to use it will give you some experience and you can experiment to find out techniques, it will not teach you how to be a video editor. Same with the other video editors. If you want to become a professional video editor, there are college courses in this, some lasting 3 years or more, which will give you ...


3

This is a well-known bug when exporting to H.264. Unfortunately, I'm not clever enough to understand why this happens, but it's a side effect of using the codec. I'll keep looking for an explanation I understand, however I wanted to get this answer out there. As a workaround for now, I suggest making a quick little eyeball adjustment to the comp's colour ...


2

There is a pop-up menu in the General tab in User Preferences that has all the options in dealing with timecode breaks. There is an option where you choose Make New Clip from the “On timecode break”. This option will make a new clip in the bin when a timecode break is reached. SRC: ...


2

Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects are very different programs. Premiere Pro (like all other NLE programs) has been designed to edit images together (moving or still). You can add clips to a timeline and play them back in real time with minimal rendering. The features that Premiere Pro has over After Effects makes editing sequences very easy and quick ...


2

This isn't part of Premiere, but Scenalyzer is an external tool for this that I've had some good luck with. It can scan a large video file and split it into smaller ones based on frame change detection. Then you can work with the smaller files much more easily. There's a freeware version, and a more featured paid edition.


2

I don't use CS4 but in CS5.5 you can do it this way: Open the Composition dialog, open the Settings tab, and choose Custom as preset (this should be the first entry). Now you can change all parameters. To save you preset, click the button Change preset at the lefthand bottom.


2

FCP can export an XML file that contains the basics of your sequence. Premiere can then import this and create a native project file based on the contents of that XML. I'm pretty sure Premiere can also export a similar file for import/conversion into FCP (I haven't tried though). It's worth noting that the formats are likely to change considerably years ...


2

To be fully honest, it's impossible to tell. Even now, there's a bit of an industry battle between FCP (which is dead following FCX), Premiere and AVID. Your best bet would be to edit in Premiere and keep an ear out, upgrading every 3-4 years with Premiere and possible emigrating the project over to whatever NLE is the industry standard at that time. ...


2

Either Avidemux or FFMpeg+Avisynth(+Avanti) will do the job. The former should be faster to get going.


2

A common problem for a slow edit is incorrectly setting the codec of the sequences. Unless under very specific circumstances (of which I'm not sure of), you should set your sequence codec (when you create the new sequence and Premiere asks you what preset it should use) to be identical to your footage.


2

You should be safe setting playback rate at 0.400. 59.94 is actually 60/1.001 and 23.976 is actually 24/1.001, so the 0.4 multiplier is technically exact. Switch off resample to be sure. Of course, how Vegas actually handles this internally is anybody's guess. One way to test this would be to generate a frame sequence just containing an incremental numeral ...



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