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6

First off, if you have audio with your video (that you want to replace with your high-quality audio recording), then step #1 is to nudge the Zoom audio track to line up the impulse of the clap with the corresponding impulse of the scratch audio from the video file. To do that, you need to change the Timecode Display Format to Audio Samples. Once you do ...


4

This sounds like a perfect candidate for using multi-camera editing. You can automagically synch all the clips using their audio, and turn them into a multicam source, which lets you edit from the multiple synched cameras quickly and easily. How to do it in premiere: Select your clips in the Project panel. Then, right-click the selected clips and choose ...


3

The orange bar is the frame indicator. In the screenshot, the playhead is displaying the last frame of your in/out range. If the playhead stopped one frame further, as you suggest, it would be showing the next frame AFTER your in/out range (and could be confusing, although obviously this method is too!).


2

Here's one way to do it. I'll assume you have basic motion tracking knowledge already for the sake of brevity. AfterEffects Turn on 3D space for your footage layer. Track the player in your footage. I'm going to guess that you'll have to do a lot of this by hand, but there's not really a faster way to track a player like this. Apply the track to a Null, ...


2

Generally, MP4 is better for compatibility, whereas AVCHD provides the better quality. MP4 (which by the way can mean a million different things, in this case it probably refers to MPEG-4 Part 14) files will be compatible with most devices and media players as is, and will be smaller in size compared to AVCHD. This is the option I'd recommend if you wanted ...


2

Premiere and FCP-X both have auto-sync features to get multiple audio and video clips synced together. Chances are very good that you can get your first video clip to align with the audio clip automatically. You might then be able to incrementally sync each additional clip with the audio clip, one at a time. I'm pretty sure neither program would do ...


2

Create a timeline from the master audio track, then drop the video clips one by one onto a matching video track using the native sound from those clips as a guide to line them up with the good audio. Then mute or delete the audio from the clips.


2

After Effects is probably your best bet, as it integrates seamlessly with Premiere and Illustrator. Create your diagrams in Illustrator, import them into After Effects, and convert them to shape layers. You can then animate them, and add the AE compositions to the Premiere project.


2

Adobe Premiere is Non-linear editing application. Any changes made in it don't have any influence on footage on your hard drive. Not audio, not video. It is feature, which prevent damaging footage files. It is based on trimming, not cutting. However, if you really want it, you can trim your audio, export it from Premiere, and then import back. But I can't ...


1

Syncing video tracks by correlating the audio was the original application called "PluralEyes". The functionality was incorporated in to higher-end video NLE apps as mentioned here previously. But the original app is still available and being improved. Ref: http://www.redgiant.com/products/pluraleyes/


1

I have Lumix G6 with same options (MP4 and AVCHD). Some things about AVCHD: It brake video into multiple files, but since you gonna edit them in Premiere, you can handle this. Sometimes Adobe Premiere have problems with audio at AVCHD. If Premiere don't see audio in AVCHD files, that mean you have problems with your license. You shall reactivate it. And ...


1

I take it you are looking for Motion Tracking. Unfortunately, Premiere Pro doesn't have that capability. You'd have to set keyframes for the animation manually, which can be a pain if it needs to be accurate. If you need to do automated Motion Tracking, you could switch to After Effects which comes with that capability (see link above).


1

H.264 (and the soon-to-be popularized H.265) is highly compressed which means your computer needs to work harder to work with it. ProRes, even though the files are larger, will allow for a smoother editing experience.



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