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6

With low light levels your brightest signal will be close to the noise floor, so you only really have three options: a camera with better low light performance (although this can only take you so far) More expensive sensors can give a lower noise floor, allowing you to resolve more detail a faster lens As Jason commented: If the widest aperture ...


5

The best bet is to avoid getting it on the recording. The use of a wind cover can help break up the wind and prevent it from interfering with a recording. Once it is there, particularly if it is really loud, there isn't a whole lot you can do about it that will result in satisfactory audio. You can reduce it some, but it is unlikely to be able to be ...


4

Certainly using RAW on ML will help. With 14 bit color, your noise reduction options are a lot more advanced. Traditional noise reduction that you are used to from photos can be used with video as well using either color grading software or editing software. (With RAW video, it would be in the color grading software before mixing down to processed clips.) ...


3

The EOS 650D does have a wind noise reducer built in. I can't say how truly effective it might be (and imagine that there is some loss somwehere because of the processing.) Otherwise there are now DSLR focused wind deflectors called Wind Jammers and Micro Muffs. In the broadcast industry a boom microphone usually has a 'zepplin' or wind cheater covering ...


2

I use audacity for this not perfect but gets the job done. You will need to extract the audio and reattach it with you editing software. http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Noise_Removal


2

The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


2

Yes, as DragonLord said, with the extended edition. And assuming it's in a format (AVI, MOV etc. that Photoshop supports. Once open, select Filter > Convert for Smart Filters. Then run any filter, including noise reduction, and it will apply it to all frames. Then Export > Render to Video.


2

I am the author of the code you are reading. It appears you were an alpha user of Audacity 2.1.0 in advance of its release, which was only days ago. You have a version of the noise reduction effect with many experimental optional controls exposed to the user that are not in the release version. You may be interested in what I wrote here about the ...


1

It sounds like you are using your laptop's microphone, and that your main problem is the lack of a quality mic. If you own an iPhone, especially iPhone 5 or later, I would recommend you use the voice recorder app, and email the audio files to yourself using the Share button. The iPhone's microphone is surprisingly good for audio. High end Android phones also ...


1

If this is no raw material, there is no additional pixel information to balance your colors and achieve a natural look. Only chance you have is to denoise your video and desaturate the colors. Try to find a good relationship between brightness and noise to get an acceptable result. Unfortunately there is no good, free, build-in or open source solution at ...


1

After a bit of searching, I found an article surveying some of the commercial software noise reduction options. For hiss/hum type noise removal (as opposed to crackles and pops), no approach other than noise-gates in multiple frequency bands was mentioned. The differences between implementations are in the default settings, the control knobs available, and ...


1

Like it is said in a comment, use more light and dial the ISO down. This is how filmmaking has been done for years and years. My guess is on the MK3 5D if you are getting tons of noise, you are underexposing and maybe trying to correct it in post. The MK3 is rpetty good and doesn't generate a lot of noise. If you absolutely have to shoot at a higher ISO ...


1

Try seperating the audio and video streams of the WMV and AVI files - I don't have an app in mind but there should be some free ones avaliable. Put the video part in, which will remain in the original format (WMV or AVI) and should work. For the audio, use Soundbooth to convert it into a variety of formats like WAV, MP3, WMV, etc. until the import works ...


1

Use Adobe Audition. Find a section where there is only wind noise (no speech) and use this to analyse the noise in the Noise Reduction effect. Then apply those settings to the rest of the audio. If you don't have 10 seconds or so of noise, you can edit some together. A high pass filter set to about 40Hz can help too, but it's never going to get rid of all ...


1

The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...



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