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The best bet is to avoid getting it on the recording. The use of a wind cover can help break up the wind and prevent it from interfering with a recording. Once it is there, particularly if it is really loud, there isn't a whole lot you can do about it that will result in satisfactory audio. You can reduce it some, but it is unlikely to be able to be ...


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The answer is always "More light". The higher the illumination of the sensor (within obvious limits), the less noise or grain. If you must deal only with ambient light -- you can't supplement or fill in -- then open the iris. However, in doing so you trade off depth of field, so it's a balancing act. Generally, avoid increasing preamp 'gain' to compensate ...


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The EOS 650D does have a wind noise reducer built in. I can't say how truly effective it might be (and imagine that there is some loss somwehere because of the processing.) Otherwise there are now DSLR focused wind deflectors called Wind Jammers and Micro Muffs. In the broadcast industry a boom microphone usually has a 'zepplin' or wind cheater covering ...


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Yes, as DragonLord said, with the extended edition. And assuming it's in a format (AVI, MOV etc. that Photoshop supports. Once open, select Filter > Convert for Smart Filters. Then run any filter, including noise reduction, and it will apply it to all frames. Then Export > Render to Video.


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Try seperating the audio and video streams of the WMV and AVI files - I don't have an app in mind but there should be some free ones avaliable. Put the video part in, which will remain in the original format (WMV or AVI) and should work. For the audio, use Soundbooth to convert it into a variety of formats like WAV, MP3, WMV, etc. until the import works ...


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I use audacity for this not perfect but gets the job done. You will need to extract the audio and reattach it with you editing software. http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/Noise_Removal


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The first thing is to make sure any gain is off. Gain on a video camera is like high ISO on a digital still camera. It increases the noise floor significantly and causes much more noise in even a good image. This should make the camera make other adjustments to try to preserve the exposure with a lower noise floor. If there is still too much noise, it ...



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