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If you don't mind using a computer. There is a great solution (for me at least) which is called Blender, if you don't know about it, it is a free sortware that lets you do 3D and mix 3D with video, but it also lets you do video editing and a lot more staff. Google for Blender. With that you don't need to be very precise to record your ghosts, just record ...


5

There are so many interesting ways to do this. One of the easiest ways (in-camera, no post production work) is to use a piece of glass. Film Riot did a tutorial on it, they explain it best, see below: ...


2

A few good options to consider: If you disobey the 180 degree shutter rule, and shoot at a lower shutter speed, you'll get more motion blur in your shot. Whether or not this is what you're going for is up for debate (it'll produce a dream sequence - ghostly like effect), but it's worth trying out. Note that EVERYTHING in your shot with have increased ...


4

If you ditch your plan to use moving shots you can do a simple background subtraction which will look a lot cleaner than greenscreen given this is a low cost production. This works by having a shot of your scene without any actor in it e.g. only the background and then film your scene with the actors without moving the camera, afterwards you can use a ...


1

For fixed camera shots, if you plan the shot so that they don't pass over any other actors, you can simply shoot them on one plate and shoot the rest of the actors on another plate. You then mask the one plate over the other so that they appear semi-transparent and possibly use a blurred difference mask for adding an edge glow. Greenscreening overall is ...



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