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4

Both MKV and MP4 are container file formats. Container formats define how actual audio, video, subtitle and other data are structured. MKV is an open standard format, while MP4 comes from the ISO and is based on the QuickTime file format.


3

While your self-selected answer will work, it requires modifying the file again when you do want the subtitles. Why not just create an empty but syntactically valid SRT file and mux that as the first subtitle stream (leaving the original as a secondary stream)? Even if the player is set to display subs, nothing will show up. No need to mess with ID strings. ...


2

If you wrote a small script (say in python) you could use the Command line client of the software convert all the videos sequentially. Python has good system calls functionality and make this quite easy.


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Add the subtitles to your large mkv file first. Then mkvmerge will split the file with the subtitles automatically. To add the subtitles, the easiest is to use mkvmerge-GUI. It will also show you the command-line it uses. Or you can try something like this directly: video="your_large_video.mkv" st_en="english.srt" st_fr="french.srt" ...


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I don't know Windows, but I have just gone through this in Mac OS X (Linux Applicable). mkvtoolnix is your friend here, and is available for Windows. I used the GUI to check (a sample of) my files to make sure the audio tracks that I wanted to keep and delete were in the same order in the files. Then I manipulated the options in the GUI to match what I ...


1

What player are you using? Unless you have the "forced" flag set, it's a player option whether subtitles are displayed automatically or not and in which language if you have several subtitle tracks. First, set the "default-flag" to false: mkvpropedit video.mkv --edit track:s1 --set flag-default=0 Then lookup your player preferences. In VLC (2.0.8), I ...


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I gave up and contacted the author of mkvpropedit to ask if it was possible to do what I wanted to do. The first answer I got was 'No'. But I persevered and asked if there was any setting that will trick the player into not recognizing a subtitle track? The response was to set the Codec ID to something the player doesn't support. Eureka! mkvpropedit --edit ...


1

The only way to do it with literally zero mathematical quality loss is to make a gigantic output file with a lossless codec. (e.g. utvideo, FFV1, or x264 in lossless mode (--qp 0). A better solutions that would achieve the same thing is: mux the subtitle file into the mkv, with mkvmerge. You set a flag so it either plays by default or doesn't. Then you'd ...


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This question is a bit nonsensical as Matroska is only a container format, however I think it does bring up a deeper question on how video files work in general. Matroska doesn't actually define the way anything inside it is encoded or encrypted, it just stores the information that says what was used on the content so it can be decoded. While Matroska does ...


1

That depends on your video file format and possibly if you have a surround encoder. Some file formats provide multiple audio channels that can be configured for different speakers, others rely on a Dolby encoding or similar to provide the speaker information in one audio stream. Either use a file format that supports multiple independent audio tracks per ...


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That's really a loaded question. In general, the rest of your content is going to look better if you leave the computer at native resolution and let the computer scale the video. If for example you have a video that is a slightly different size, then you would end up scaling to get the resolution setting and again to get the native resolution of the ...



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