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4

I am owner of Rode VideoMic Pro and have to say I just throw it in my bag together with dslr and lens. Wind cover gets a bit deformed sometimes, but it gets into original shape in five minutes after taking it out of the bag. I have one of the cheaper Lowepro bags and I can fit in my Nikon D5200 with one lens on, second lens and said microphone just fine. Mic ...


3

It depends no how far away you are shooting from and how centered your subject will be. You definitely DO NOT want a lavalier mic for your situation. They do offer very nice noise reduction while not requiring a boom operator, but they still require setup and distinct micing of each speaker. This will not work at all in your use case. You absolutely want ...


3

Do you own a high-end smartphone? You can plug-in pretty much any microphone and have very decent audio quality. Some Android phones even support usb mics. So you probably need a cheap adapter for standard stereo or mono mics to work with the 3 channel type headphone+mic jacks in modern phones. Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0058DOWH6/ It ...


3

I haven't worked with the VideoMic Pro, but I have worked with the RODE VideoMic, and I usually just put that straight into my camera bag with everything else, unprotected, and never had any issues. If you're bent on buying a case for it though, I would look at a Pelican case (the Pelican 1060 might be big enough: ...


2

Your most critical need is going to be a professional low noise analog to digital converter and pre-amp with a decent quality microphone to go with it. There are a few options you can pursue for this depending on your interests. Since you are currently working with a computer directly, you could go for any of a number of professional audio capture devices ...


2

What you want is generally called an "HDMI audio extractor". There are several hardware products on the market that will extract the audio in the HDMI stream to an audio out connection and pass-through the video part. A search on ebay gives you several results: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=HDMI+audio+extractor Though if you need very high quality ...


2

Why do you think that it isn't as durable as your camera or lens? I don't have experience with that particular mic, but in general, professional quality mics are also built very solidly. The wind cover might get a bit squished, but the microphone itself should be even more durable than your camera or optics are (since it should be able to resist damage ...


2

The Canon VIXIA HF R500 is the least expensive consumer camcorder (from a major brand) that I have been able to find. I own one and love it. It has an external microphone jack that is compatible with my wireless lapel mic receiver. http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/camcorders/consumer_camcorders/consumer_camcorders/vixia_hf_r500


2

Most wireless lavalier microphones for video recording use are sold as single receiver + transmitter packages. I believe you can get receivers that take more than one input, but they are designed for AV production use (e.g. stage shows and so on) and are mains-powered and expensive. So if you want wireless you'll probably have to buy four transmitter + ...


2

Here's what I use: an Amazon Basics case for a 5-inch satnav. It's semi-rigid, and just the right size for the Videomic Pro, although it's a tight fit with a fluffy windjammer on, and even has an internal pocket where I store two extension cables and spare rubber bands for the shock-mount. Here's the link on AmazonUK: Amazon Basics SatNav Case.


1

First thing is to check whether your audio interface XLR input can supply 48 V phantom power. If the answer is yes, look for a microphone that can be powered by phantom power. If this is not the case, look for an adapter that can power your mic and output to your XLR input. For your use case, I think that a headset mic would be better than a lavalier one as ...


1

Audience questions : there's not much alternative than to have another mic (probably a hand-held one) ready to be used by the audience. If the room is really small, possibly a cardioid microphone on a stand pointed toward the audience could do the job. Round table : have one or two hand-held mics that the speakers take when they want to speak. That's a ...


1

It sounds like you are using your laptop's microphone, and that your main problem is the lack of a quality mic. If you own an iPhone, especially iPhone 5 or later, I would recommend you use the voice recorder app, and email the audio files to yourself using the Share button. The iPhone's microphone is surprisingly good for audio. High end Android phones also ...


1

I don't know Pitivi but in general it's not hard to do what you need, just sometimes a little time consuming. Use a digital audio recorder that can record 48K at 16 bits at a solid fixed rate. In this case since you already have sync audio from the camera, you can use it as a reference track to find and check sync with the separate track. It helps to use a ...


1

There are multiple answers. The easiest and cheaper solution is to get a shoe extender. The more professional way is to get an external recorder specifically designed for DSLR mounting. Look at the products of BeachTek and JuiceLink for examples.


1

You will need an electret power supply that accepts phantom power and then will hook it up via a standard XLR cable to the H5. If you have the bare wire version, you will also need a connector to put on the bare wire so that it can tie in to the electret power supply. You will also need to make sure that +48v phantom power is turned on on the H5. ...


1

For the H1, X/Y micing is a good option for an improved stereo room mic, but isn't going to be as focused as a shotgun mic. The input is nice, but doesn't really buy you much over the built in 3.5mm jack that many DSLR's already have. 3.5mm also isn't a professional audio connection, so it greatly limits the selection of microphones available. It does give ...


1

What you can always do is intercept the signal before it goes into the camera. Buy a small mixer, plug the mic into it and use the headphone out of the mixer to monitor the mic. Then take the master stereo out of the mixer and run it into your camera. You should get on the camera what you hear on the phones. You may want one of the HDMI audio extractors to ...


1

Professional film makers generally use audio recorded separately from the video on dedicated recorders using professional mics (using XLR cables and the like). 3.5 mm audio connectors in particular are almost exclusively a consumer level connector. So for a professional level, the answer is use something like a Zoom h4n, h5 or h6 and microphones of your ...


1

Inspired by @Professor Sparkles♦'s answer, I decided to go for Samsung Galaxy S4* and a noise-reducing microphone with 3.5mm jack for Samsung (and other phones). I will keep you posted if this combination works well. * I was offered Galaxy S4, S5 and LG G3 as the best video producing smartphones currently in the reseller's catalogue. My choice was based on ...


1

It sounds like you need a shotgun mic Also known as a zoom mic. These microphones are designed to help isolate the sound you want originating from the subject while rejecting unwanted ambient noise. The pickup angle is slightly adjustable. To have a narrower cone, you need a longer mic. (see video below) Also to reduce wind noise pickup, you usually cover ...


1

Let me start by saying that $1800 is a very, very small budget for this kind of a setup. Bordering on impossible to get the kind of results you probably are hoping to get, if not over the line in to impossible. Video is sadly a rather expensive field to get in to and a professional quality camera the likes of what most popular YouTube shows are produced ...



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