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1

Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


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What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


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I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...


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One option, similar to what you're describing: use a green spotlight. In post production, create a chromakey using that color green. You can then replace it with black, dark gray, or any color you want. It will work best on white walls and clothes, and not very well when it's over something that changes its color (like a purple shirt or a vase of orange ...


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As mentioned above, no. The bulb and circuitry is not set up for it. If you are looking for a cheap solution to home video lighting, go to a hardware store and buy a set of Double Halogen Work Lights With stand. It will run you like $40 and is just as good as any fancy video light for basic stuff.


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Generally speaking, it is not possible to use a camera flash as a light for video. A true flash is a high intensity discharge bulb which produces a very short (1/100 second or shorter), very bright burst of light. It is not designed to be used for constant light output and has insufficient power, durability or cooling to be able to operate as a continuous ...


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It may be a backlight, or it may be an overhead light for use in getting the noir look. Either way, use of a softbox is fine. It would actually have a narrowing impact on the category of the light rather than a widening influence. The light itself in that kit radiates light in all directions, the inside edges of the soft box bounce that light forward, it ...


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Is it normal to use a softbox for a back light? It can be sometimes. With two softbox lights, one can very nicely, evenly light a background show here. Note in the video that the subject is much farther than 2ft from the background. Wouldn't it leak light onto the wall behind the subject? Yes, it would, but not because it's a softbox. Softboxes only ...



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