Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Generally speaking, it is not possible to use a camera flash as a light for video. A true flash is a high intensity discharge bulb which produces a very short (1/100 second or shorter), very bright burst of light. It is not designed to be used for constant light output and has insufficient power, durability or cooling to be able to operate as a continuous ...


5

The ability to set custom white balances largely makes color filters unnecessary. The only thing they really (potentially) offer is better dynamic range. With a white balance adjustment, it alters the processing of what the sensors pick up, but if there is a really bright orange area for example, it could overload those sensors and thus detail would be ...


5

The photo shows two grip heads, two arms and a c-stand. The kino would have its normal mounting plate (the one in the second photo). The two grip arms are interlaced together; this makes them trombone-able (adjustable in length), stronger, and gives the gag a longer reach. One grip head attaches the arms to the c-stand, another attaches the kino to the ...


4

Let's first review the basics of green screen: 1) screen about 5 or more feet behind subject so it is out of focus from subject. 2) flat screen, no wrinkles. 3) flat lighting, no shadows, no hot spots. 4) subject can not wear green or wear shiny things or see through things. Review Vegas Chroma Key: Once you engage the chroma key effect, use the eye ...


3

Generally speaking yes. This makes it easier for your camera to define the correct colors. Normally you gain experience best by committing errors or by analyzing the errors of others. So, if you see an image that is too cold, the color temperature / white balance should be higher. If it's too warm, the color temperature should be lower. If you have two ...


3

While I can't recommend any particular products and generally stack exchange communities are hesitant about product recommendations, what I can recommend is that at a minimum you should use two light sources offset to the left and right of the camera and if budget allows, put an additional light behind them facing up. Ideally, one of the lights behind the ...


3

The way most stage laser effects work is by using a holographic plate or diffraction grating which splits the single beam up into multiple beams. [image removed due to a DMCA request from copyright holder] These then pass to further holographic elements to provide shapes and lines, and these can then be manipulated further with lenses or mirrors.


3

Directing actors is a technical part of film making. It's not easy, and if your actors don't give good performances, chances are you won't have a good film. People can usually forgive bland cinematography and clunky editing – but if they don't believe the characters then you're going to have no chance in engaging the audience. I go to a film school myself ...


3

For this kind of lighting, I would recommend going down to your local Home Depot (or equivalent hardware super store) and looking for construction lights. They are generally cheep and some run on batteries. They are also generally small and portable. You could also try some MagLights on D batteries (the ones the 5-0 use) These lights are generally not that ...


3

The biggest factor in planning for aggressive grading is your wardrobe and set design. Eric Escobar gave an excellent speech about this in 2009 at the SF Supermeet, which the MacVideo guys made available online: "Plug-ins Won't Save You". I know this isn't the technical solution you were looking for, but the nature of contrast and saturation is that ...


3

The parasites you talked about is called noise. The setting you can change to get less is called the ISO. It corresponds to the old ASA value we had before the digital age. We can't see a thing, we can only see light. That's the way the universe is built up. Same with the camera. It sees the light reflected off surfaces. So white objects reflects all light ...


3

Start by throwing all the technical questions out the window. ALL of them. Don't ask about what cameras to use, which software works, or techniques. Change your mindset and think about your story. What is it that you're going to tell us about? Find a story that's based on solid collective-consciousness archetypes (read Joseph Campbell's "The Hero's ...


3

The following video was made entirely on a Nokia N8 mobile phone. It is the winner of the Nokia Shorts competition 2011 and was just posted this week in the short list for the Vimeo 2012 Awards under the 'Advertising' catagory. Time Magazine says it's the 9th Most Creative Internet Film 2011. http://vimeo.com/25451551 As you can see by the credits there is ...


3

As currently stated, the answer is, you can't. The only thing special about that video is that it is very well planned out and coordinated with lots of lighting making it almost certainly outside your budget to reproduce something similar. The video work itself is all actually fairly basic. Any camera with a decent dynamic range and sharpness could ...


3

Is it normal to use a softbox for a back light? It can be sometimes. With two softbox lights, one can very nicely, evenly light a background show here. Note in the video that the subject is much farther than 2ft from the background. Wouldn't it leak light onto the wall behind the subject? Yes, it would, but not because it's a softbox. Softboxes only ...


3

You're going to need to do a little experimentation to find out what works best for you, but here are a few things to consider: First, the minimum amount of light you need depends on the performance of your camera and lens. Stanley Kubrick shot parts of Barry Lyndon in candle light, but he used a f0.7 Zeiss prime which was built for NASA and customized to ...


3

If you can't use green-screen (the ideal), I'd recommend a couple of things. First, use a screen with a matte surface to reduce specular reflections and present more diffuse ones. These are somewhat rarer that glossy ones. Second, angle the screen slightly top-forward, to deflect some reflections down and away from the camera. A slight parallax won't be ...


2

If you're on a budget, look at getting some 250-500W work lights. They're less than $20 a pop, and coupled with some stands, some elbow grease in the workshop, you can build a barn-door lighting rig which will give you more control over the lights. Work lights, while cheap, are not as flexible and don't produce the same quality of light as dedicated video ...


2

Lighting is not trivial and deserves attention and training to master. I certainly have lots to learn even after more than 25 years with working with studio lighting. There is no one thing you can buy that will work in every situation beyond understanding and mastering white balance and exposure. Nothing to invest in on this step. However, if you want to ...


2

Find some people IRL who share your interest and enthusiasm for filmmaking. They don't have to be professionals, and you don't have to pay for a fancy film school, but opening a discussion with real people about technique is the best way to start learning. Watch movies with these people, press the pause button when something grabs your attention, and talk ...


2

Remember its all about the story. How to tell the story. And the tools you use to tell it. Editing, lighting, special effects and sound (are the tools used to tell your story.) Remember: story, story, story. Starting out: A good entry level camera to start filming with by Tom Antos. ...


2

Regarding the part about your built in mic and wind noise/pops: Cut a piece of high quality foam to the size of the mic opening on your camera, and use tiny strips of velcro to attach. I did this for an expensive Sony Camcorder, it works great, cuts the wind down and muffles pops. I actually bought a real foam mic windscreen (for less than $10) and cut it ...


2

The difference in brightness outdoors compared with indoors is much greater than you'd think due to the way your brain compresses the dynamic range. If you've ever been on a location shoot that's been properly lit for video you'd see the difference - it hurts your eyes! I'm afraid the point here is that you're not going to recreate outdoor lighting for ...


2

If you're working with video, the cine model is the one you want. It lets you meter for motion, not just ISO, f stops, and shutter speeds. I've had the 758 for years... great meter.


2

I don't know how you are lighting this, but generally speaking photographing flat work requires an even light source. Usually two diffused lights above the surface at 45 degree angles should accomplish this task. Your lighting suggests that you are not using a diffused source(s) as witnessed by the hot spot in the middle of your screen hence the halo effect. ...


2

If anyone was curious, I managed to pick up a 400W halogen work light (supposedly delivering equivalent to 500W) and the exposure within a few metres (3-4) was spot on. I also bought a 250W halogen that I would probably use more as a fill light as it's a stop or so darker. At f/2.8, ISO 100-320, 1/100th at 50 frames per second, the exposure on the histogram ...


2

This type of photography is called 'available light' which covers shooting subjects without adding strobes or other lights. It is favored by many photographers for many reasons. I personally favor this because the subject and scene appear more natural to me. Things that glow interest me as well and there are tons of things that fit this: the moon, neon art, ...


2

You may actually be better off without the natural light. The color is going to be different between the sunlight and the interior lights and will be much MUCH brighter. It will result in strong shadows and some weird white points. If you are shooting video, shutter speed isn't really much of an issue since you'll want to have it set at your frame rate ...


2

It depends entirely on what you are looking for. If you want an image that appears consistently lit, then you will want to have uniform light temperature. If however, you want to have some type of effect lighting, you will want to alter the lighting temperature. Say for example you have a candle in the scene (or want to allude to a fire off-screen), or ...


2

There seem to be a few basic misconceptions here. For cartoons you don't need anything fancy as long as cell-shading is supported, which is typically a camera filter. Lighting is actually done in your 3d animation software. The job of a render engine like Mental Ray or V-ray is simply to process the scene you build to generate the final image, but it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible