Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I received an answer from an actual lawyer: Context matters. As a general matter, it is perfectly "legal" to use anyone's logo or brand indicia in a film, without permission, as long as it is done in a manner which does not falsely suggest the endorsement or sponsorship of the film or the producer's products by the trademark owner. For example, it is ...


3

In addition to what AJ says, and I am also not a lawyer, one reason for not displaying actual brand logos is if your use (by a character, etc) could be seen as placing the brand in disrepute, or in some way showing it in a negative light. Many companies are very touchy about reputation and won't hesitate to call out the legal beagles.


3

I think you have the reason that brands don't appear in films backwards. "Promotional Consideration" is the term for a company paying to have their product used in media as a form of advertising. Generally, entertainment companies avoid displaying any brands because they want to be paid for the product to appear and couldn't charge for it if they just did ...


3

Preface: I am not a lawyer. These comments aer based on my personal experience navigating copyright law. The general rule of thumb is that you can only use media that you have created. If you have not created the media, it's best practice to get or buy permission to use it, and get that permission in writing as a release form. That being said, something ...


3

The route that most people take, is to release it 'pseudonymously' rather than anonymously. So you just make up a pseudonym and use that in the copyright/licence statement. A better approach may be to use the little-known CC-SA 1.0 licence, which was unfortunately retired by Creative Commons due to it not being used a lot. This licence requires a reuser to ...


2

Anything published anywhere is automatically copyrighted, with all rights reserved to the author or publisher. The source of this video is known, so your obvious choice here is to contact the publisher and ask permission. This is a promotional video, so it's very possible that they will permit your use, with proper attribution or for a small fee. But you ...


2

Please note this is UK legislation After some research I found the following in a Government consultation paper: From MODERNISING COPYRIGHT: A modern, robust and flexible framework http://www.ipo.gov.uk/response-2011-copyright-final.pdf There is a clear mismatch between what is permitted by law and the type of private copying that most people think is ...


1

Often short clips for demonstration purposes qualify as fair use, however you can't generally use more than a few seconds. Even video clips that have been released on the Internet are not necessarily safe to use as the content may still require you to have a license. Your best bet is to contact a lawyer since fair use varies greatly from jurisdiction to ...


1

There are different laws regarding ripping DVDs depending on where you live. Two points to consider though: Cases have been made (in the US) that you are within your rights as a license holder to make an archival copy for backup. Having said that, breaking DRM is almost always instantly illegal. Little bit of a catch-22 there for sure. Having said all ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible