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You can probably do it directly through the EOS software. It is possible to get a live video stream from the camera over the USB connection. Note that USB2 is not going to be able to carry a full quality HDMI stream though. This is why the Intensity is USB3. It requires USB3 because the bandwidth requirements for the quality level it is working at ...


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Native resolution is always better than non-native. If it only has a resolution of 720p, then it would have to be down-converting to that resolution which means it has to blend pixels which can produce artifacts from the pixel blending. (Notably, softer edges is the most likely.) Update: I'm sorry, re-reading, I noticed that it isn't native for either ...


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I've found an answer to my specific problem that's a little ugly, but might be of some use. The basic premise is to ensure that the first device in the chain does not support (or is capable of disabling support for) HDCP. Macs and iOS devices are opportunistic when it comes to HDCP; they'll always attempt to negotiate it, but will fall back to unencrypted ...


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You would need a device that supports HDCP if your output source is utilizing it. That's the entire point of the system. The video signal is encrypted and will only exchange the data with a device which can cryptographically authenticate itself as an authorized HDCP receiver. Getting that certificate requires proving that they are going to follow the rules ...


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Are you sure that the Lenovo and 2011 MacBook support HDMI out via their displayPort? Native DisplayPort signals are not compatible with HDMI. What a DisplayPort to HDMI adapter actually does is simply put a DisplayPort that supports HDMI signaling in to the appropriate mode to send an HDMI signal, but it is not a required part of the DisplayPort standard. ...



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