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3

I would use three pieces of hardware for this task. A recording laptop. A device that allows you to input the HDMI to the recording laptop, aka, a frame grabber. An HDMI spliter. A recording laptop Any old laptop will do, really. It doesn't need super specs, like dedicated graphics, but you certainly want at least a mid-range machine. Like an Intel i5 ...


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The latest and greatest HDMI specification is 1.4a (and version 2 is expected to be released this year). The fastest/highest bandwidth category of HDMI cable is "HDMI with Ethernet." The rating of a cable's shielding (Class 2, Class 3) has more to do with fire resistance and US wiring code and is not really relevant to the matter of signal loss. ...


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For amateur events, SDI may be overkill compared to using simple Component. The key for long runs is to separate the various components so that they don't degrade. There is a similar question here about long distance runs. As for HDMI to SDI, there should be no quality loss compared to HDMI as both are digital formats supporting full uncompressed HD ...


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Native resolution is always better than non-native. If it only has a resolution of 720p, then it would have to be down-converting to that resolution which means it has to blend pixels which can produce artifacts from the pixel blending. (Notably, softer edges is the most likely.) Update: I'm sorry, re-reading, I noticed that it isn't native for either ...


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You can probably do it directly through the EOS software. It is possible to get a live video stream from the camera over the USB connection. Note that USB2 is not going to be able to carry a full quality HDMI stream though. This is why the Intensity is USB3. It requires USB3 because the bandwidth requirements for the quality level it is working at ...


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What solved the problem: Check your capture software settings. All settings (your monitor/capture device settings, your hardware settings and the settings in your capture software) should be correct and equal. What can help track down similar issues: Very likely a framerate issue. Only the 4K version of the Blackmagic Capture cards supports 60FPS and your ...


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Blackmagic Design's Decklink cards are a starting place for desktop computers: https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/decklink For laptops there's both Intensity: https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/intensity And UltraStudio: https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/ultrastudiousb3 Other companies also make such products (and even Blackmagic ...


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Mac Mini does not have HDMI input. GF6 has no video output through USB.


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Bandwidth issues aside, HDMI is "protected" by HDCP, which prevents you from doing anything like this. Depending on how noisy your neighborhood is RF-wise, this could work for you: http://www.amazon.com/Nyrius-Transmitter-Streaming-Satellite-NPCS549/dp/B009E6R89C


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Some DSLRs output HDMI video that does not meet full HDMI specifications. It is not unusual to find combinations of source and destination gear that is incompatible. The HDMI can be viewed on permissive screens (consumer TV receivers, etc.) but not on more professional gear that strictly adheres to the HDMI standard protocols.


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Which Lilliput monitor do you have and what exactly is the output format of the 5d Mkiii? Not all Lilliput screens can display progressive resolutions. Sometimes cameras provide "fake" interlaced on the monitor out (PsF) even if recording progressive to avoid that problem. It is a common problem with the BM Pocket Cinema Camera and (some) Lilliput screens ...


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This should work: Hauppauge HD Personal Video Recorder 2 Gaming Edition Description The HD Personal Video Recorder 2 Gaming Edition from Hauppauge! allows you to record gameplay from your preferred gaming console in Full HD 1080p video. With HDMI input and output ports as well a component video input port, this personal video recorder supports ...


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a) You can't output 10 different video signals on your single HDMI output. Besides limitation of the graphic card of your computer, that would also require generating/reading 10 different video streams from your computer. One possible option, depending on your project aim and structure, is to produce 1 hi definition video stream from your computer and use an ...


1

The problem is that the HDMI output on your T3i is not clean. You would still have all the UI from the camera interface placed on it. Higher end cameras (like the 5D mark iii) and some other makes have a clean output option, but I don't believe the T3i does. You can use the third party MagicLantern firmware to force the interface clean, but at that point ...


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The TV still has to translate the color information and format, so there is, in effect, still some decoding on the TV. The difference is that it is uncompressed. The output from the device matches whatever the source captured, in whatever image format the source uses, but there is no loss of detail from applying compression. Compressed requires vastly ...


1

Speaking to the Canon technical team, it seems that at the time of this writing, there is no way on this particular model of camera to change the resolution of the HDMI output.


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According to the specs on the Canon site your camera can record in 50i/p and 25p 1920x1080. Are you absolutely sure you can only get 60fps on the HDMI? Because that sounds rather weird that you get more FPS on the HDMI than the camera can actually record. If you set the recording option to 25FPS normally on canon cameras the FPS should also apply to the ...


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Instead of the Teradek unit, I would try the new Epiphan Pearl, which can stream and record to/from multiple sources.


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The GoPro would be a perfect candidate for what you want. It's a so called "action camera" and is a very robust (water tight with case) wide-angle camera that can shoot in very high frame rates with HD resolution (even more at lower frame rates). Suitable recording options for high speed sport events would 1080p @ 60FPS or 720p @ 120FPS. The camera also has ...


1

There are a plethora of capture cards on the market in that general price range from numerous manufacturers. There are two main things to worry about with these devices. First, for analog inputs, such as component video, you need to consider the quality of the analog to digital converters as well as what capabilities they have for scaling and format. ...


1

I've found an answer to my specific problem that's a little ugly, but might be of some use. The basic premise is to ensure that the first device in the chain does not support (or is capable of disabling support for) HDCP. Macs and iOS devices are opportunistic when it comes to HDCP; they'll always attempt to negotiate it, but will fall back to unencrypted ...


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If cost isn't an object, I believe the higher end rack mount HyperDeck accepts an external timecode (ref in), but it's also quite a bit more expensive ($1000).


1

A 1.4 cable should work fine with a 1.3 signal, however an HDMI 1.4 signal will not work with an HDMI 1.3 cable or an HDMI 1.3 output unless the source is capable of using a prior standard.


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At the present the highest category of HDMI cable shielding is Category 2


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Pretty simple actually--running the signal through most HDMI splitters seems to work just fine. I can't be sure if this is a feature of all splitters, but Iv'e got two different models/brands of HDMI splitter and I can record HDMI just fine with 'em.


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You would need a device that supports HDCP if your output source is utilizing it. That's the entire point of the system. The video signal is encrypted and will only exchange the data with a device which can cryptographically authenticate itself as an authorized HDCP receiver. Getting that certificate requires proving that they are going to follow the rules ...


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It isn't really clear what you are asking here. The 23.9 frame rate is most likely 23.976 which is the more accurate standard frame rate for 24fps. This shouldn't result in a stutter. It is possible that your computer is simply not powerful enough to play the video smoothly. Are you trying to capture from both the Intensity and the MX02 at the same ...


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Are you sure that the Lenovo and 2011 MacBook support HDMI out via their displayPort? Native DisplayPort signals are not compatible with HDMI. What a DisplayPort to HDMI adapter actually does is simply put a DisplayPort that supports HDMI signaling in to the appropriate mode to send an HDMI signal, but it is not a required part of the DisplayPort standard. ...


1

Depending on how the switch is designed, it might not be sending the DDC signal back to the computers when the switch isn't set to point to them, and this could be confusing the cable-detection logic on the output ports. When you switch the switcher to the Mac, try using the Mac's "detect displays" button (on the Displays control panel) to see if it comes ...


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There are no real differences between HDMI 1.3 and 1.3b so I would blame either the switch (most likely), the cables (do you have the correct ones for each device), or even the configuration settings on each machine. If you plug each one into the projector individually do they work? If so, it is your switch that is at fault. If not, try replacing the ...



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