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11

How important is sharpness? 1080p video is barely 2 megapixels, so it would stand to reason that an ultra-sharp lens is not really necessary to get sharp-looking video. Is this an accurate assumption? It depends on the way the DSLR is capturing it's video from the sensor. The first method is the most obvious one, take the image and scale it, but there's ...


7

Yes, almost all rackmount devices are designed to bear their loads on the front plate. Only in very rare circumstances have I seen a piece of rack gear that has not remained rigid while mounted in a rack, and that was only after years of being in one. There are also some rack pieces that have a second set of mounts in the back, but I haven't seen that in a ...


6

Do you expect the large image to be seamless, both in dimension and in tone? Each is a separate challenge. Color-matching 8 projectors can be daunting, depending on the technology. As a general rule, you would overlap the images from the projectors and feather their edges. This costs you something in size, with the benefit of disguising mismatches to some ...


5

As said by AJ Henderson and Jim Mack, you should just use one computer with multiheaded video. On an X11-based window system, you can use xrandr to organise the screen segments. Most operating systems have also GUI tools for doing this. The biggest problem will probably be the fine alignment. Most good projectors have settings for perspective correction ...


5

No, there is no practical limit that we know of yet to what would be best, there is however a practical limit to what we can capture and display. In tests with airforce pilots, subjects were able to identify a plane from being shown a frame for only 1/220th of a second.1 They eye is able to pull information out of extremely short periods of time, but ...


4

The easiest way to do this is multiheaded video cards. Many video cards support 3 displays and it is possible to get cards that support even more than that, particularly via DisplayPort (which allows for chaining multiple displays on a single connection). When using multiple displays in Windows, it will allow you to specify how they are arranged and ...


4

One additional option on Linux setup will be DMX: http://dmx.sourceforge.net/ If enough heads per machine can not be supported and the presentation data is relatively "slow", DMX will provide a single, ultra high resolution X11 display to an application and will automatically split the image between multiple "slave" X servers forming a unified display wall. ...


3

Your best bet is to save them on two disks, that is two back up copies. A RAID sounds nice, but have you ever had to replace a RAID system with a faulty controller? It can be a nightmare. Forget RAID as a back up unless you are talking about an instant snapshot retrieval system that is online 24/7. If you are talking about a long term back up as in a real ...


3

I researched this when building my own computer for HD video editing about a year ago - I don't remember all of my sources, but there's a hardware guide on the Adobe Primiere Hardware Forum (very helpful place) that was a big help. That guide is several years old, so the specific hardware recommended is out of date, but the principles are still there. ...


3

Drives are definitely the answer. My miniDV setup worked fine with 5400rpm, but HD playback looked like internet video from 2004. Upgraded to 7200rpm internal SATA drives, and ~most~ of the time, I've got good results. While I've never done any work with SSDs, I suspect those would be the ideal circumstance. For external drives, I've used 5400rpm USB2.0 ...


3

If you have a 8 core CPU I'd bet it is a fast one too, so that shouldn't be a problem. 16 GB is more than enough for HD, and DDR3 should ensure the speed. The GPU shouldn't have much to say as long as it's not crap. If you have 6 slow harddrives, it would be a bottleneck. You should have at least 7200 rpm disks!


3

Rackmount gear is almost universally designed to bear all its weight from the front panel, yes. As Zeronyne points out, even fairly heavy gear is fine, as long as it is mounted properly. I will simply add that I have on rare occasions seen rack gear that had optional mounting hardware for both the back in addition to the front. This is quite uncommon, ...


3

I do video with my Canon 5d Mkii. I am a beginner at video, but I have done photography for years. 1) How important is sharpness? My lenses are all about the same sharpness, and I've never A/B'ed two different lenses at the same focal length. In my experience, lens sharpness is at the bottom of the list of problems with a shot. Getting enough light, ...


3

The RedRocket card provides encoder and decoder support via specialized hardware that can do particular calculations well. Having multiple cards doubles the amount of calculations that can be done. Since at least some of the calculations can be done in parallel, having multiple cards increases the amount of processing power available. It probably wouldn't ...


3

No, VGA ports on a laptop are output only.


3

As currently stated, the answer is, you can't. The only thing special about that video is that it is very well planned out and coordinated with lots of lighting making it almost certainly outside your budget to reproduce something similar. The video work itself is all actually fairly basic. Any camera with a decent dynamic range and sharpness could ...


3

The reason why modern TVs have been pushing higher framerates is not because people can see much beyond 30-60Hz, but because if the source framerate and the display framerate doesn't match exactly, then the display has to either drop frames, or add frames. This mismatch is visible, particularly during panning scenes, for instance. It used to be that ...


2

Adobe has tech specs on all of the software they sell on their website (www.adobe.com). I found the tech specs for [premier elements] 9 that you can look at. (http://www.adobe.com/products/premiereel/systemreqs/)


2

I think your trouble is partly related to using the overloaded, usually inappropriate word "pro" instead of "broadcast". Marketing departments love using the first word, but when you think about it, that word doesn't describe the type of work, nor the level of quality. The rest of your trouble may just be unfamiliarity with this kind of hardware, which is ...


2

First question to ask is: Does your video editing software actually use your GPU at all in the editing process? If it isn't written to use CUDA then you will not benefit from getting a better video card, other than being able to view it in higher quality on the screen. For software that can, all of those factors are important: Memory size is likely to ...


2

A common problem for a slow edit is incorrectly setting the codec of the sequences. Unless under very specific circumstances (of which I'm not sure of), you should set your sequence codec (when you create the new sequence and Premiere asks you what preset it should use) to be identical to your footage.


2

I don't think tape is extreme, or a sharpie. But then I would probably just replace the LED's or pop a wee voltage drop in there to dim them down if they were that bad - this probably is extreme if you don't do home electronics much :-) Tape is probably most sensible - as if you get a gig where you really need the lights you can always rip it off again.


2

I don't know of any cables which do it, but you have a simpler solution: A few recent HDMI computer monitors will be able to do this in hardware - an example I quite like is the The Samsung Syncmaster C24A650X


2

I've done 4-camera DSLR shoots with Nikon gear (D7000 & D3S). For our shots, we simply did a clapstick after all the cameras rolled AND just before cutting, so we had two sync points. Our longest shot was about 18 minutes long, and there was no noticable drift in sync in out post system. Although genlock is the PREFERRED way to go, I've found that a lot ...


2

Blackmagic and Livestream are your friends :) You probably want to get 3 cameras - one for the priest, one for roaming action shots and one for the audience. You'll need a whole bunch of microphones and an audio mixer. But you probably already know all this. Buy a Blackmagic TV Studio and buy a Livestream Broadcaster - plug the TV Studio's HDMI output into ...


2

When tracking there are two (main things) that you need to be concerned with in tracking. While there are many variables that need to be taken into account, when shooting there are two things that you should keep in mind. First off, contrast, 99% of all tracking software uses contrast in the luminance channel (brightness) to determine a point and where it ...


2

That or the UpDownCross converter should meet your needs as long as the frame rates are the same. I'd personally stick with BlackMagic's hardware as you already have their ATEM and they make some of the most cost-effective hardware around. They aren't the top quality brand for sure, but you won't beat the value for the price pretty much anywhere else. If ...



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