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Depends on what your definition of good green screen is. In terms of free software to do green screen well...Only one that I can even think of that does keying is Da Vinci Lite which is free from blackmagic's website. It is pretty complex and pro based, but with a little searching around you might find what you want. I am not sure if you can technically ...


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Fake it. Use your preferred compositing application to turn down the exposure value over a specified region. For example, if you're talking about a round spotlight affecting a flat region, create an appropriately shaped ellipse, feather it to taste, and turn down the exposure. If instead you're talking about volumetric lighting (like shining a light ...


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What you're talking about is essentially a negative light. (There's a scene in the Simpson's where Moe doesn't want his fancy customers seeing Homer and the guys, so he unscrews a lightbulb and it casts negative light over them, leaving them in total blackness.) Unfortunately, they don't exist in real life. So your options are: Light things in such a way ...


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I've got another idea, but it's a little kooky. You light the WHOLE SCENE with spotlights - the fewer the better. On the key spotlight, you add a gel that has an opaque black circle on it. Then as you move that around, that section of darkness will pass over parts of the set/props/actors. For a more focused spot, you could use a bright digital projector ...


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One option, similar to what you're describing: use a green spotlight. In post production, create a chromakey using that color green. You can then replace it with black, dark gray, or any color you want. It will work best on white walls and clothes, and not very well when it's over something that changes its color (like a purple shirt or a vase of orange ...



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